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(Wired)   How to win at bridge using only a few key concepts from quantum mechanics   (wired.com ) divider line
    More: Interesting, quantum mechanics, St. Paul Pioneer Press, self-energy, first instance, photons, information theory, physics  
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1383 clicks; posted to Geek » on 16 Jun 2014 at 3:38 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



22 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-06-16 02:59:06 PM  
Sharif don't like it.
 
2014-06-16 03:40:30 PM  

calbert: Sharif don't like it.


What phony dog poop?
 
2014-06-16 03:43:38 PM  
Author has never heard on no trump. Amateur.
 
2014-06-16 03:44:10 PM  
I guessed superposition before clicking the article.

Now to read.


Okay... So we're they're talking about superposition.  Of course those of us with a more mathematical background understand that this is actually basic set theory, and superposition is just one way that theory crops up in the real world.  But good for you, wired writer Adam Mann.  You've got some basic game theory understanding.
 
2014-06-16 03:55:23 PM  
One rule: Tunnel, don't bridge.
 
2014-06-16 04:22:37 PM  

simplicimus: Author has never heard on no trump. Amateur.


You mean this?

The bids have to be given in a very specific, constrained vocabulary of 38 words or phrases.

I think what he's saying is:
1. "1 club"
2. "1 diamond"
3. "1 heart"
4. "1 spade"
5. "1 no trump"
6. "2 clubs"
7. "2 hearts"
. . .
33. "7 hearts"
34. "7 spades"
35. "7 no trump"
36. "double"
37. "redouble"
38. "pass"
 
2014-06-16 04:25:39 PM  
what a strange game. the only winning move is not to play.
 
2014-06-16 04:55:51 PM  
I have never, in my entire 31-year life, met anyone who knows how to play bridge.
 
2014-06-16 05:04:41 PM  
I loved that game.  Started playing when I was 8; stopped after I moved out of parent's house when I never met anyone else who knew how to play.
 
2014-06-16 05:15:28 PM  
Bridge consists of cheating according to an unspoken set of rules that no group of more than three people can agree upon
 
2014-06-16 05:30:45 PM  
Would need someone like Charles Wallace Murry to figure that out
 
2014-06-16 06:16:44 PM  

ikanreed: Okay... So we're they're talking about superposition. Of course those of us with a more mathematical background understand that this is actually basic set theory, and superposition is just one way that theory crops up in the real world. But good for you, wired writer Adam Mann. You've got some basic game theory understanding.


I don't quite follow what you are saying (maybe you can explain it better) but it seems like you missed the point of what they're proposing.

They aren't doing anything like quantum computing if that's what you were thinking.  Actually all they're doing is using an effect of quantum mechanics as a cheap way to get around the rules.  According to the article, bridge teammates could gain an advantage if they were able to communicate additional information besides the bid.  However, it's against the rules.  But by using quantum entanglement to pass information, they technically aren't breaking the rules because the information doesn't actually exist at the time the bid was made, since quantum states don't collapse until they are measured.

(Truth is, if anyone tried to actually use such a device, I suspect a new rule against using time travel to communicate would be in-place very quickly.)
 
2014-06-16 08:08:15 PM  
I got past "auction" instead of "bidding", and then I got to "declare the number of hands they expect to win" before I had to take a break to complain in here. Now I'll go read the rest of the article.
 
2014-06-16 08:42:21 PM  
Two such simple and easy to master subjects combined. Piece of cake.
 
2014-06-16 08:46:02 PM  
Ok, in spite of the tantalizing headline, the real purpose of Pawlowski's (et al)  research is clear: to give an accessible illustration of a seemingly terribly complex physical phenomenon.

Of course it's not actually a practicable technique for gaining an advantage in bidding, as it's obviously outside the rules,  but, from a technical implementation perspective, you would be able to convey *more* information incorporating quantum techniques than just classical techniques.

There is also a handy diagram in the Physics Review article showing how they constructed this experiment with a lot of ejaculating penis heads pointing every which way. Apparently the owners of the dicks are quite aroused by public television. Why all the dongs are outside of, and pointing away from the female-type parts is unclear. I mean, the eggs are right in there. Perhaps they are avoiding the arrow in there.
 
2014-06-16 09:58:40 PM  
Too complicated. Try this instead:

www.zrot.com
 
2014-06-16 10:45:25 PM  
Looks like he wants to try for a little slam in a minor.
 
2014-06-16 10:54:06 PM  

DoctorCal: Of course it's not actually a practicable technique for gaining an advantage in bidding, as it's obviously outside the rules, but, from a technical implementation perspective, you would be able to convey *more* information incorporating quantum techniques than just classical techniques.


How so?  It seems to me that two people can use a keyfob, or something like it that produces identical random sequences, in exactly the same way as the quantum entanglement device described in the article.  I think the whole point is that the quantum device actually would be legal according to the letter of the rules (because the entangled particles don't actually share information, per se), although of course it wouldn't fit the spirit.

Also, I'd have to opine that entanglement is actually pretty easy to grasp once you understand superpositioning, and this use case is a pretty straightforward use of it.
 
2014-06-16 11:06:40 PM  
I'd rather play Mornington Crescent.
 
2014-06-17 12:00:37 AM  

aerojockey: DoctorCal: Of course it's not actually a practicable technique for gaining an advantage in bidding, as it's obviously outside the rules, but, from a technical implementation perspective, you would be able to convey *more* information incorporating quantum techniques than just classical techniques.

How so?  It seems to me that two people can use a keyfob, or something like it that produces identical random sequences, in exactly the same way as the quantum entanglement device described in the article.  I think the whole point is that the quantum device actually would be legal according to the letter of the rules (because the entangled particles don't actually share information, per se), although of course it wouldn't fit the spirit.

Also, I'd have to opine that entanglement is actually pretty easy to grasp once you understand superpositioning, and this use case is a pretty straightforward use of it.


Point and laugh, people. Point. And. Laugh.
 
2014-06-17 12:13:59 AM  

jmsvrsn: Bridge consists of cheating according to an unspoken set of rules that no group of more than three people can agree upon


This.  Anyone teaching you bridge will likely teach you that table talk is cheating, whilst they proceed to whoop your ass using table talk.
 
2014-06-17 12:14:19 AM  

DoctorCal: aerojockey: Also, I'd have to opine that entanglement is actually pretty easy to grasp once you understand superpositioning, and this use case is a pretty straightforward use of it.

Point and laugh, people. Point. And. Laugh.


Normally I'd get trolly at this point and start bemusing you (like I did with the manual transmission fetish crowd this weekend), but I am genuinely curious what it is you think everyone should point and laugh at.  Only thing I can think of is that I verbed a noun.
 
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