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(Salon)   It's June 16, so that means it's Bloomsday, the time we remember when James Joyce's novel Ulysses was once considered obscene, dangerous, and a threat to readers due to its ability to put anyone to sleep every other page   (salon.com) divider line 36
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394 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 16 Jun 2014 at 5:04 PM (6 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-06-16 04:00:32 PM
To be honest, he IS Irish.  No Irish person has ever written anything that wasn't seditious and frankly evil.
 
2014-06-16 04:22:37 PM

Tell Me How My Blog Tastes: To be honest, he IS Irish.  No Irish person has ever written anything that wasn't seditious and frankly evil.


Or brief. The driver's education pamphlet in the United States is approximately 21 pages. In Ireland, the prologue alone is 277 pages, and that's just setting the scene of the person, the car and the highway.
 
2014-06-16 05:12:54 PM
cdn1.thefamouspeople.com
 
2014-06-16 05:24:59 PM
24.media.tumblr.com
 
2014-06-16 05:29:36 PM
music for the thread

/yes, I know there's a different version using the actual Joyce quote but I still prefer the original
 
2014-06-16 05:32:00 PM
Fark you, subby. Read U when I was young teenager and loved it. Still love reading bits every so often. Stick to Zane Grey and you'll be ok.
 
2014-06-16 05:36:28 PM
No one in the history of literature has ever read Finnegan's Wake.  Anyone who has claimed to is a liar.
 
2014-06-16 05:41:05 PM
Every other page? You made it that far?
 
2014-06-16 05:41:37 PM

Schmerd1948: Fark you, subby. Read U when I was young teenager and loved it. Still love reading bits every so often. Stick to Zane Grey and you'll be ok.


twilight.ponychan.net
 
2014-06-16 05:49:46 PM
i1076.photobucket.com
 
2014-06-16 05:52:27 PM

Schmerd1948: Fark you, subby. Read U when I was young teenager and loved it. Still love reading bits every so often. Stick to Zane Grey and you'll be ok.


If you're going to make an insult using a Western author why go Grey, who wrote arguable some of the best Western novels, instead of L'Amour?  That's one of the most weirdly pretentious insults I've read.
 
2014-06-16 05:58:04 PM

Lumbar Puncture: Schmerd1948: Fark you, subby. Read U when I was young teenager and loved it. Still love reading bits every so often. Stick to Zane Grey and you'll be ok.

If you're going to make an insult using a Western author why go Grey, who wrote arguable some of the best Western novels, instead of L'Amour?  That's one of the most weirdly pretentious insults I've read.


He's too hipster to have heard of L'Amour. . .
 
2014-06-16 05:58:59 PM

Nix Nightbird: [i1076.photobucket.com image 450x848]


LOL

Magnetbox
 
2014-06-16 06:06:06 PM
Agreed Subby. I tried to read it, I really did, but I've read instruction manuals more interesting than that dreck.
 
2014-06-16 06:08:33 PM

Lumbar Puncture: Schmerd1948: Fark you, subby. Read U when I was young teenager and loved it. Still love reading bits every so often. Stick to Zane Grey and you'll be ok.

If you're going to make an insult using a Western author why go Grey, who wrote arguable some of the best Western novels, instead of L'Amour?  That's one of the most weirdly pretentious insults I've read.


I have a bunch of 1st edition Zane Grey (thanks, grandad!) and he couldn't get published today.  Not because he was a bad writer, but because he was a good writer colored with the racial overtones of his day.  Way too many "redskinned savage" types of references.
 
2014-06-16 06:08:47 PM

Lumbar Puncture: Schmerd1948: Fark you, subby. Read U when I was young teenager and loved it. Still love reading bits every so often. Stick to Zane Grey and you'll be ok.

If you're going to make an insult using a Western author why go Grey, who wrote arguable some of the best Western novels, instead of L'Amour?  That's one of the most weirdly pretentious insults I've read.


Pffft, I know insults you've never even heard of yet....
 
2014-06-16 06:17:59 PM

Rent Party: No one in the history of literature has ever read Finnegan's Wake.  Anyone who has claimed to is a liar.


Ive read a large chunk. Even worked to annotate the first 20 some pages. Then I gave up. The hipster bug went away and i got better.
 
2014-06-16 06:24:43 PM
Joyce predicted that people would be unraveling and decoding Ullysses for centuries to come.
 
2014-06-16 06:26:21 PM

Rent Party: Lumbar Puncture: Schmerd1948: Fark you, subby. Read U when I was young teenager and loved it. Still love reading bits every so often. Stick to Zane Grey and you'll be ok.

If you're going to make an insult using a Western author why go Grey, who wrote arguable some of the best Western novels, instead of L'Amour?  That's one of the most weirdly pretentious insults I've read.

I have a bunch of 1st edition Zane Grey (thanks, grandad!) and he couldn't get published today.  Not because he was a bad writer, but because he was a good writer colored with the racial overtones of his day.  Way too many "redskinned savage" types of references.


Huck Finn says "You think you got problems?"
 
2014-06-16 07:24:43 PM
I read it. It took me awhile to realize every chapter was written in a different style.  That made it interesting to me.  The book is a story about nothing.  I like to think he wrote it that way as a lark, just to show how many styles he could use.  I've seen way too many people try to derive deep pretentious meaning from it and really it's the just Seinfeld show.
 
2014-06-16 07:31:41 PM

Rent Party: No one in the history of literature has ever read Finnegan's Wake.  Anyone who has claimed to is a liar.


It was assigned in one of my classes. The version by Cliff S. Notes was much, much better. I think I got through about forty pages.
 
2014-06-16 07:45:29 PM
The head coach at my summer camp would read this to us.  He said he wanted no sissies.

/it was very entertaining
 
2014-06-16 07:58:06 PM

oohpah: I read it. It took me awhile to realize every chapter was written in a different style.  That made it interesting to me.  The book is a story about nothing.  I like to think he wrote it that way as a lark, just to show how many styles he could use.  I've seen way too many people try to derive deep pretentious meaning from it and really it's the just Seinfeld show.


Ah, no. Joyce wrote Ulysses to include just about every writing style known to man (in fact, the 14th episode basically goes through a parody of the history of English writing), in addition to throwing most of it out the window, but he uses the novel, which is probably one of the most all-encompassing ever, to cover just about every piece of human experience. He wrote it knowing full well people would be analyzing it for years to come.

As for Finnegans Wake, Joyce's wrote it to basically come up with a writing style that resembled dreaming. And he succeeded. But for the same reason that no one actually wants to hear about anyone's dreams, it's too incoherent and unreadable.
 
2014-06-16 08:12:20 PM
huh. it's not that hard, folks

/liked ulysses. loved dubliners. no, didn't try finnegan's wake

I want to make molly bloom pant like a dog in heat
 
2014-06-16 08:16:01 PM

oohpah: I read it. It took me awhile to realize every chapter was written in a different style.  That made it interesting to me.  The book is a story about nothing.  I like to think he wrote it that way as a lark, just to show how many styles he could use.  I've seen way too many people try to derive deep pretentious meaning from it and really it's the just Seinfeld show.


Leopold Bloom was not master of his own domain.
 
2014-06-16 09:40:53 PM
Joyce should've stuck with short stories exclusively.... "The Dead" is an excellent one.
 
2014-06-16 10:15:14 PM
I read Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man when I was in Uni, and loved it.  So I read Dubliners and loved it.  So I steeled myself and read Ulysses ... and really liked it.  It wasn't a page turner, and I don't pretend to understand half of what I read, but it was fun to read and to try to decipher.

I read the bits I didn't understand out loud, and enjoyed the poetry of the writing.  Here's a random paragraph -- read it out loud and just enjoy the wordplay:

A last lonely candle wandered up the sky from Mirus bazaar in search of funds for Mercer's hospital and broke, drooping, and shed a cluster of violet but one white stars. They floated, fell: they faded. The shepherd's hour: the hour of folding: hour of tryst. From house to house, giving his everwelcome double knock, went the nine o'clock postman, the glowworm's lamp at his belt gleaming here and there through the laurel hedges. And among the five young trees a hoisted lintstock lit the lamp at Leahy's terrace. By screens of lighted windows, by equal gardens a shrill voice went crying, wailing: Evening Telegraph, stop press edition! Result of the Gold Cup race! and from the door of Dignam's house a boy ran out and called. Twittering the bat flew here, flew there. Far out over the sands the coming surf crept, grey. Howth settled for slumber, tired of long days, of yumyum rhododendrons (he was old) and felt gladly the night breeze lift, ruffle his fell of ferns. He lay but opened a red eye unsleeping, deep and slowly breathing, slumberous but awake. And far on Kish bank the anchored lightship twinkled, winked at Mr Bloom.
 
2014-06-16 10:31:48 PM
Fark You I'm Drunk:
As for Finnegans Wake, Joyce's wrote it to basically come up with a writing style that resembled dreaming. And he succeeded. But for the same reason that no one actually wants to hear about anyone's dreams, it's too incoherent and unreadable.

He wrote Wake because he and Beckett were higher than the clouds in a Paris hotel room contemplating the farkin' good hashish that all that Ulysses money could buy.  The conversation went like this.

Beckett:  Dude, you could write down a scrabble board and people would buy it.

Joyce:  No way.  I couldn't get away with that twice.

Beckett:  <puking his guts out in the commode>bababadalgharaghtakamminarronnkonnbronntonnerronntuonnthunntr ovarrhounawnskawntoohoohoordenenthurnuk!

Joyce: <writes it down> I think I got that!

Literary cone heads:  It's genius!  Genius I say!

Beckett and Joyce:  Holy shiat, they bought it.

/Fin
 
2014-06-17 12:21:18 AM

Rent Party: Lumbar Puncture: Schmerd1948: Fark you, subby. Read U when I was young teenager and loved it. Still love reading bits every so often. Stick to Zane Grey and you'll be ok.

If you're going to make an insult using a Western author why go Grey, who wrote arguable some of the best Western novels, instead of L'Amour?  That's one of the most weirdly pretentious insults I've read.

I have a bunch of 1st edition Zane Grey (thanks, grandad!) and he couldn't get published today.  Not because he was a bad writer, but because he was a good writer colored with the racial overtones of his day.  Way too many "redskinned savage" types of references.


That could go for a bunch of authors.  Especially Western authors, not so much for the redskinned savage stuff but all the Mormons as common antagonists would probably twist a few panties.
 
2014-06-17 12:47:53 AM
Ulysses is one of those works I feel i should read at some point but haven't yet because the only talk I hear about it is how difficult it is to get through.

So, any particular edition I should look for/avoid?
 
2014-06-17 07:07:23 AM

AlgaeRancher: [cdn1.thefamouspeople.com image 300x250]


Wilde was born in Ireland, but his parents were mostly Anglo-Welsh.  Remember that the Irish Catholics and the English Protestants didn't inter-marry.
 
2014-06-17 10:00:15 AM

Rent Party: No one in the history of literature has ever read Finnegan's Wake.  Anyone who has claimed to is a liar.


Read it out loud, preferably with a few drinks in you. It's like an impressionist painting- there's little meaning in a brush stroke, you have to step back. Ignore all those references, they're not important(to start with), the meaning doesn't appear in a sentence or even a paragraph, but across pages. It tries to teach you a new way of reading.

What a meanderthalltale to unfurl and with what an end in view of squattor and anntisquattor and postproneauntisquattor! To say too us to be every tim, nick and larry of us, sons of the sod, sons, littlesons, yea and lealittlesons, when usses not to be, every sue, siss and sally of us, dugters of Nan! Accusative ahnsire! Damadam to infinities
 
2014-06-17 10:04:48 AM

Dwight_Yeast: AlgaeRancher: [cdn1.thefamouspeople.com image 300x250]

Wilde was born in Ireland, but his parents were mostly Anglo-Welsh.  Remember that the Irish Catholics and the English Protestants didn't inter-marry.


He considered himself Irish.  His parents considered themselves Irish. The Irish consider him Irish.

Like everything in Ireland, it gets complicated.

There's a long history in which the aristocratic families in Ireland were Protestant transplants from England, but had been there so long that they had nationalistic, even anti-Brit feelings -- especially if they came out on the wrong side of one of the many, many revolts or Brit tax schemes.

Many of Irish nationalist leaders and intellectuals before WWI came out of this tradition and were not Catholic.
 
2014-06-17 10:21:42 AM

SonsoftheSod: Rent Party: No one in the history of literature has ever read Finnegan's Wake.  Anyone who has claimed to is a liar.

Read it out loud, preferably with a few drinks in you. It's like an impressionist painting- there's little meaning in a brush stroke, you have to step back. Ignore all those references, they're not important(to start with), the meaning doesn't appear in a sentence or even a paragraph, but across pages. It tries to teach you a new way of reading.


My wife is Irish and speaks Gaelic.   The farthest I got through it was reading it out loud with her, and she basically said the same thing.

I'll never forget wading through page one...

"Rot apeck of pa's malt had Jhem or Shen brewed by arclight and roryend to the regginbrow was to be seen ringsome on the aquaface."

I got the pa's malt bit.  But then I asked her...

"But  who the hell are Jhem or Shen?"

She looked at me like I was daft....

"Jameson."

Bulb went on. We never finished it, either.
 
2014-06-17 03:31:04 PM

James Rieper: There's a long history in which the aristocratic families in Ireland were Protestant transplants from England, but had been there so long that they had nationalistic, even anti-Brit feelings -- especially if they came out on the wrong side of one of the many, many revolts or Brit tax schemes.


The Anglo-Irish.  Yeah they were a big headache for Parliament in the 19th century.
 
2014-06-17 09:01:23 PM
It took me 3 years of sporadic "reading" to "finish" Finnegans Wake. I basically read it aloud to myself at the rate of (roughly) two pages a night.
After I finished, I picked up the Skeleton Key to Finnegans Wake and confirmed that I "understood" maybe 1/10 of 1% of the text...
However, it does sound beautiful in many, many places, especially if you read it with a really cartoonish Irish accent, (as I did here and there; no offense to your wife, Rent Party.)
as for Ulysses, the last two episodes are pure delight.
 
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