If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Detroit Free Press)   50 years ago today, the Chicago Cubs traded a light hitting outfielder named Lou Brock to the St. Louis Cardinals   (freep.com) divider line 19
    More: Spiffy  
•       •       •

481 clicks; posted to Sports » on 15 Jun 2014 at 6:12 PM (26 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



19 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-06-15 04:12:06 PM  
And he started hitting the balls instead?
 
2014-06-15 06:31:12 PM  
One of the best examples against inducting guys just for reaching milestones. Brock was good, but 100 fewer hits and he never gets a second look for the hall.
 
2014-06-15 06:38:24 PM  

neon_god: One of the best examples against inducting guys just for reaching milestones. Brock was good, but 100 fewer hits and he never gets a second look for the hall.


Pretty important milestone, and being a first vote induction says many agree.
 
2014-06-15 06:50:17 PM  
50 years ago today the cubs were more than 50 years removed from their last World Series win.
 
2014-06-15 06:53:04 PM  

neon_god: One of the best examples against inducting guys just for reaching milestones. Brock was good, but 100 fewer hits and he never gets a second look for the hall.


Don't forget his 938 steals, of which 888 were during his time with the Cards.

/Still the franchise record
// .391 avg for 21 WS games
/// only player to steal 7 bases in a World Series matchup. Twice
 
2014-06-15 07:01:42 PM  
Of course they did.
 
jbc [TotalFark]
2014-06-15 07:03:00 PM  

neon_god: One of the best examples against inducting guys just for reaching milestones. Brock was good, but 100 fewer hits and he never gets a second look for the hall.


Go back to watching curling. Brock could still run circles around you.
 
2014-06-15 07:27:25 PM  

scotty425: neon_god: One of the best examples against inducting guys just for reaching milestones. Brock was good, but 100 fewer hits and he never gets a second look for the hall.

Don't forget his 938 steals, of which 888 were during his time with the Cards.

/Still the franchise record
// .391 avg for 21 WS games
/// only player to steal 7 bases in a World Series matchup. Twice


He also got caught 307 times. Very good player, no doubt, but a cut below the greats. Good average, average plate discipline, no power, mediocre defence. Great speed, plus squeaking over 3000 and being on a good team lead to him being over-rated.
 
2014-06-15 07:32:10 PM  
I never understood the fascination with brock either, it would be like cult follwings for Marquis Grissom or Kenny Lofton.

/Tim Raines was better
//I'm guessing its a generational thing
 
2014-06-15 07:35:21 PM  

farbekrieg: I never understood the fascination with brock either, it would be like cult follwings for Marquis Grissom or Kenny Lofton.

/Tim Raines was better
//I'm guessing its a generational thing


He's basically jose reyes playing corner
/100% with you on Raines
 
2014-06-15 07:44:52 PM  
And the Red Sox say "Fark You" to the Cubs.
 
2014-06-15 07:45:45 PM  

neon_god: farbekrieg: I never understood the fascination with brock either, it would be like cult follwings for Marquis Grissom or Kenny Lofton.

/Tim Raines was better
//I'm guessing its a generational thing

He's basically jose reyes playing corner
/100% with you on Raines


corner OF*
 
2014-06-15 08:50:41 PM  

farbekrieg: I never understood the fascination with brock either, it would be like cult follwings for Marquis Grissom or Kenny Lofton.

/Tim Raines was better
//I'm guessing its a generational thing


The argument for Brock is/was basically "Because steals!"

He did, but he got caught a lot.  For a guy with blazing speed who bat leadoff for 80% of his career, he didn't walk much.  He was a little above-average with the bat for a corner outfielder of his day-- heavy (but not Ichiro-great) on contact, light on power.  The fans and his peers didn't think he was a superstar-- he only made the All-Star team 6 times, and finished top 5 for MVP once.

The weird thing about Brock-- here's a guy with blazing speed who plays the easiest outfield position, and yet both objective and subjective measures show him as a poor defender.

He was a very good player overall, but he doesn't stack up well to other Hall of Fame left fielders.
 
2014-06-15 09:01:43 PM  

neon_god: He also got caught 307 times.


That means he succeeded in stealing a base slightly more than 75% of the time. You're not going to find many people in the 500+ stolen base club who succeeded more often.

farbekrieg: I never understood the fascination with brock either, it would be like cult follwings for Marquis Grissom or Kenny Lofton.


He broke a record that had been around since 1901. The first modern player to steal over 800 bases, first player since the 20's to get over 700 stolen bases.
 
2014-06-15 09:24:10 PM  

WhyteRaven74: That means he succeeded in stealing a base slightly more than 75% of the time. You're not going to find many people in the 500+ stolen base club who succeeded more often.


Tim Raines: 85%
Willie Wilson: 83%
Davey Lopes: 83%
Joe Morgan: 81%
Vince Coleman: 81%
Rickey: One Rickey (81% in metric units)
Kenny Lofton: 80%
Ozzie Smith: 80%
Paul Molitor: 79%
Luis Aparicio: 79%
Barry Bonds: 78%
(Etc.)

Given how many players with 500+ steals have an unknown number of caught stealing (because they didn't track it back in the day), I think the answer is "Nearly all of them".

Brock went often, but he gave away a lot of outs.
 
2014-06-15 09:25:41 PM  

WhyteRaven74: He broke a record that had been around since 1901. The first modern player to steal over 800 bases, first player since the 20's to get over 700 stolen bases.


Vince Coleman has 753 steals at 81% success.  Hall of Fame material?
 
2014-06-15 10:01:33 PM  
I have never seen a player in real life light up a stadium like Lou Brock. Whether he was at the bat or on base, you knew he would make something happen. Yes, I'm old but still enjoy baseball.
 
2014-06-16 12:22:09 AM  
Big Phillies fan here. I was too young to remember the infamous Phillies collapse at the end of the 1964 season when they lost 10 games in a row and lost the Pennant to the Cardinals on the last day of the season after having a 6 and a half game lead with 2 weeks to play.  But I've read how devastating it was to the Philadelphia fans whose team was the oldest one in baseball, but had never won a World Series.  It looks like the Cards would not have won the Pennant if the Cubs did not trade Lou Brock to the Cards.  And it's more than likely that the Cubs would have won the Pennant in 1969 if they had Brock; a year that they suffered a collapse and the Mets went on to win the Pennant and the World Series.
 
2014-06-16 02:52:30 AM  

chimp_ninja: WhyteRaven74: That means he succeeded in stealing a base slightly more than 75% of the time. You're not going to find many people in the 500+ stolen base club who succeeded more often.

Tim Raines: 85%
Willie Wilson: 83%
Davey Lopes: 83%
Joe Morgan: 81%
Vince Coleman: 81%
Rickey: One Rickey (81% in metric units)
Kenny Lofton: 80%
Ozzie Smith: 80%
Paul Molitor: 79%
Luis Aparicio: 79%
Barry Bonds: 78%
(Etc.)

Given how many players with 500+ steals have an unknown number of caught stealing (because they didn't track it back in the day), I think the answer is "Nearly all of them".

Brock went often, but he gave away a lot of outs.


Rickey Henderson approves of your usage of Rickey Henderson as a unit of measurement when it comes to gauging the greatness of Rickey Henderson.

www3.pictures.zimbio.com
 
Displayed 19 of 19 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report