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(Art of Manliness)   A real man keeps it on manual. The How-To guide for driving a stick shift   (artofmanliness.com) divider line 160
    More: Interesting, manual transmissions, grinds  
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3924 clicks; posted to Geek » on 14 Jun 2014 at 2:02 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-06-14 09:37:06 AM  
I'm a woman who put 250,002 miles on the clutch of my '92 SW2. I finally had to send her off to the parking lot in the sky when the frame rusted through. I'm assuming I'm part of the "Brotherhood"?
 
2014-06-14 10:50:49 AM  
Imagine being a would-be car thief who gets arrested because you can't drive a manual transmission. You'd probably have zero credibility in prison.
 
2014-06-14 12:25:43 PM  
Currently in France, where small diesel cars are what you want. Lots of luck trying to drive your F150 down a street made for an ox cart. European drivers far exceed Americans in driving skills, and on top of that are courteous. men, women, grannies all drive stick shift cars, and scooters are everywhere. The average American wouldn't drive here - no skill or patience.
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2014-06-14 01:05:44 PM  

gaslight: Imagine being a would-be car thief who gets arrested because you can't drive a manual transmission. You'd probably have zero credibility in prison.


You would learn a lot about handling a stick shift if you know what I mean, and I think you do.
 
2014-06-14 02:09:07 PM  
I just came here to shiat on the stupid website. If you need a thinly veiled right wing astroturf website to teach you how to drive a stick, you have already failed harder than faily mcfailson.
 
2014-06-14 02:16:46 PM  
Some really cool cars only come with a manual transmission.If you ever decide to buy a vintage sports car and fix it up, knowing how to drive stick will greatly expand your selection of vehicles. And if you ever win a contest where the prize is an Aston Martin V12 Vantage or a Ford Shelby GT500, you better know how to drive stick. Those cars only come with manual transmissions, and there are countless other high-end and luxury sports cars that are standard transmission only too. Why? Because guys who are willing to drop some serious coin on such vehicles tend to want the full driving experience, which is to say...

Counterpoint:  every Ferrari, Lamborghini, and more come with paddle shifters, and they are cooler than a Vantage and GT500.  Search your feelings, you know it to be true.

Manual transmission cars are generally less expensive than automatics.Because very few people today know how to drive a stick shift, the demand for them is low. This can be annoying if you're looking for a specific model of car with a manual transmission and it isn't offered. But the upside is that manual transmission vehicles are often priced lower than their automatic counterparts, and the lackluster demand for them can be a bargaining chip when you're buying used. They tend to sit on the lot longer, so tell the salesman you'd be more than happy to take that lonely manual off their hands if they'll drop the price some more.

Counter-point:  You'll also have problems reselling your car later and probably have someone bargain you down for it!

Driving stick is simply more fun!If you've only driven with an automatic transmission your entire life, you don't know the fun you've been missing. Driving an automatic feels passive and artificial - like you're merely pointing or steering the car instead of controlling it. With a manual, you actually feel like you're part of the car, and you're attuned to its vibrations and noises. Plus, manual transmissions are proactive instead of reactive - you get into the gear you need instead of waiting for the automatic tranny to hunt for the right one.

Counter-point:  Driving stick is a miserable experience in a city with heavy traffic.  You put more strain on the clutch as well, leading to transmission problems down the line.  An automatic transmission can be pretty much bulletproof and never need more than the fluid changed.
 
2014-06-14 02:19:24 PM  
I grew up driving stick in Baton Rouge (flat).  Continued driving stick until I moved to Birmingham (hilly).  Two burnt clutches later, I don't drive a stick no more!


/ don't know if actually causal . . .
// wife doesn't drive stick, so that means we don't buy stick
\\\ manually slashies
 
2014-06-14 02:24:36 PM  
I love driving stick on windy backroads. The interplay of steering, shifting, accelerating, and clutching feels like I'm dancing with the car, and the road is our ballroom. It's exhilarating.

Driving stick in traffic, less fun.
 
2014-06-14 02:26:58 PM  
You can sometimes push start a manual transmission car with a dead battery.

I can't tell you how many times this ability has saved my ass.  Although I tend to use my legs to push the car rather than using a dead battery.  It just works better.
 
2014-06-14 02:27:11 PM  

Glitchwerks: Counter-point: Driving stick is a miserable experience in a city with heavy traffic.


THIS. Plus, throw in talking on a cellphone. Driving can really get in the way of a good conversation.
 
2014-06-14 02:27:35 PM  
Is this the thread where I get to brag that every car I've owned for the last 35 years has been a stick shift?

/   Drives a Yaris
//  Suck it, Nancy boys
/// Slashies come in threes
 
2014-06-14 02:28:39 PM  
Counter-point:  Driving stick is a miserable experience in a city with heavy traffic.  You put more strain on the clutch as well, leading to transmission problems down the line.  An automatic transmission can be pretty much bulletproof and never need more than the fluid changed.

You're doing it wrong. You're probably shifting more than you need to.
 
2014-06-14 02:29:38 PM  
Counterpoint:

Stickshifts and safetybelts, bucket seats have all got to go. When we're driving in the car, it makes my baby seem so far.
 
2014-06-14 02:33:02 PM  

bingethinker: Counter-point:  Driving stick is a miserable experience in a city with heavy traffic.  You put more strain on the clutch as well, leading to transmission problems down the line.  An automatic transmission can be pretty much bulletproof and never need more than the fluid changed.

You're doing it wrong. You're probably shifting more than you need to.


In heavy traffic, all you're doing in engaging and disengaging the clutch. Hopefully, you don't have a heavy clutch.
 
2014-06-14 02:34:07 PM  

bingethinker: You're doing it wrong. You're probably shifting more than you need to.


Counter-point:  I never granny shift.  I'm always double clutchin' like you should.
 
2014-06-14 02:34:42 PM  
New automatics get equal or better gas mileage and equal to better acceleration (AFTER taking into account the additional weight they add).  The difference in price is negligible and offset by the hit you take on resale.  There's no point in getting a stick anymore in the States.
 
2014-06-14 02:42:52 PM  

DerAppie: Counterpoint:

Stickshifts and safetybelts, bucket seats have all got to go. When we're driving in the car, it makes my baby seem so far.


And when you're going the distance, when you're going for speed, she'll be all alone in her time of need.
 
2014-06-14 02:43:42 PM  
I drove a stick in L.A. traffic for 20 years.

I had an automatic for a couple years and found it just as annoying. With a manual, you're on and off the clutch a lot.
With an auto, you're on and off the brake just as much.

I don't get the love for paddle shifters. Sure, they can shift 700 milliseconds faster than I can, but I'm not racing and a 'real' manual is a lot more engaging.
 
2014-06-14 02:44:47 PM  

DerAppie: Counterpoint:

Stickshifts and safetybelts, bucket seats have all got to go. When we're driving in the car, it makes my baby seem so far.


Well, a lot of nice caaaaarrrrss...are japaneeeeeeseeeee!
 
2014-06-14 02:44:58 PM  
I've driven stick most of my life, and drive one right now........ and I cannot farking wait to get rid of it and get an automatic. I drive through DC traffic and stick SUUUUUUUUUUUUCKS through rush hour traffic of any significance. My next car will be an automatic, and hopefully I'll finally be buying a new car by the end of the year. It won't be a moment too soon.

Glad I know how to drive stick, and now I never want to again.
 
2014-06-14 02:46:43 PM  
I went from an automatic to a stick back in December and there's been pros and cons to it but sometimes the gas pedal talks to me through my foot when in third gear at certain speeds and RPMs and I really like what it says to me.
 
2014-06-14 02:49:41 PM  
Tried to learn stick several times. Just can't get it. No idea why. Riding a motorcycle is a piece of piss, though. I think I just have stupid feet.

Motorcycles are more fun anyway.  scontent-b-sea.xx.fbcdn.net
 
2014-06-14 02:51:51 PM  

gaslight: Imagine being a would-be car thief who gets arrested because you can't drive a manual transmission. You'd probably have zero credibility in prison.


He'll have plenty of experience with a stick shift while in the lockup, I'm sure.

/haha penis joke
 
2014-06-14 02:52:06 PM  

mongbiohazard: I've driven stick most of my life, and drive one right now........ and I cannot farking wait to get rid of it and get an automatic. I drive through DC traffic and stick SUUUUUUUUUUUUCKS through rush hour traffic of any significance. My next car will be an automatic, and hopefully I'll finally be buying a new car by the end of the year. It won't be a moment too soon.

Glad I know how to drive stick, and now I never want to again.


We just got rid of my wife's manual, and it is fantastic to not have one in the DC area.
 
2014-06-14 02:52:37 PM  
There have definitely been some sketchy parking spaces here in Seattle that I wouldn't have even tried to get into (or out of) with a stick shift. Streets steep enough that it seems like if you stopped hard enough you would flip the car forward. I wouldn't mind putting in the effort to learn when my car finally dies (by then we might be out of oil anyway) but it's really nice to have versatility when you only own one vehicle, and not having to be concerned about whether you can handle the road or parking conditions.

I also get really aggravated being stuck in traffic, and not having to take care of shifting is really nice. I doubt it's very pleasant to be stuck in our relatively frequent and epic traffic jams on the freeways here with a manual.
 
2014-06-14 02:54:05 PM  

Tobin_Lam: bingethinker: Counter-point:  Driving stick is a miserable experience in a city with heavy traffic.  You put more strain on the clutch as well, leading to transmission problems down the line.  An automatic transmission can be pretty much bulletproof and never need more than the fluid changed.

You're doing it wrong. You're probably shifting more than you need to.

In heavy traffic, all you're doing in engaging and disengaging the clutch. Hopefully, you don't have a heavy clutch.


I should also have said, you're using the clutch more than you should. If you leave a little space in front of you, and chug along at a steady speed, you can avoid a lot of stopping and starting.

Hey, I only do it every day on my way to work. What do I know?
 
2014-06-14 02:57:22 PM  

bingethinker: Hey, I only do it every day on my way to work. What do I know?


Counter-point:  You never had your car!
 
2014-06-14 02:58:01 PM  
My first car was a 1980 Chevette with a stick and I've only owned 1 car since that was an automatic. I will say that driving it in heavy slow moving traffic can suck at times, but for the most part I enjoy it.

I can't stress enough TFA's point of finding a hill with little to no traffic to practice with early on as well. Once you can start from a stop on a hill, you'll be able to do the rest, and make sure that you learn how to stay at a standstill on a hill using only the clutch and gas. Once you're out there driving normally is not the time to realize that if you haven't practiced, you'll find yourself rolling backwards towards the cars behind you if you're ever at a stop sign or light on a hill.
 
2014-06-14 03:01:46 PM  

Froman: There have definitely been some sketchy parking spaces here in Seattle that I wouldn't have even tried to get into (or out of) with a stick shift. Streets steep enough that it seems like if you stopped hard enough you would flip the car forward. I wouldn't mind putting in the effort to learn when my car finally dies (by then we might be out of oil anyway) but it's really nice to have versatility when you only own one vehicle, and not having to be concerned about whether you can handle the road or parking conditions.

I also get really aggravated being stuck in traffic, and not having to take care of shifting is really nice. I doubt it's very pleasant to be stuck in our relatively frequent and epic traffic jams on the freeways here with a manual.


PROTIP: When starting and stopping on hills, the parking brake (lightly applied at the right time), helps with that pesky coasting backwards thing.
 
2014-06-14 03:06:44 PM  
Glitchwerks
If you don't know how to drive stick, just say so.
 
2014-06-14 03:08:28 PM  

Sniffers Row: Froman: There have definitely been some sketchy parking spaces here in Seattle that I wouldn't have even tried to get into (or out of) with a stick shift. Streets steep enough that it seems like if you stopped hard enough you would flip the car forward. I wouldn't mind putting in the effort to learn when my car finally dies (by then we might be out of oil anyway) but it's really nice to have versatility when you only own one vehicle, and not having to be concerned about whether you can handle the road or parking conditions.

I also get really aggravated being stuck in traffic, and not having to take care of shifting is really nice. I doubt it's very pleasant to be stuck in our relatively frequent and epic traffic jams on the freeways here with a manual.

PROTIP: When starting and stopping on hills, the parking brake (lightly applied at the right time), helps with that pesky coasting backwards thing.


Wrong wrong wrong wrong wrong!

The parking brake is exactly the wrong thing to do for preventing yourself from rolling backwards. Doing so either ties up your shifting hand, or your clutch foot depending on the type of parking brake you have. As I mentioned before, learning to be at a stop on a hill using the clutch and gas is how you stop facing upwards on a hill. If you find yourself using the brake excessively going down a hill then downshift, it will force your car to go down slower allowing you to use the brake less.
 
2014-06-14 03:09:54 PM  

Dingleberry Dickwad: My first car was a 1980 Chevette

My dad had several of those in series. It was an indestructible little runabout with a sewing machine under the hood but they ran and ran and ran. The only problem with that car was that you needed to stand when using the brakes.
 
2014-06-14 03:10:01 PM  
If you didn't learn to drive manual by having your father take you out when your 12-15 years old and yell at you till you get it, you're not a man.
 
2014-06-14 03:12:02 PM  

gaslight: Dingleberry Dickwad: My first car was a 1980 Chevette
My dad had several of those in series. It was an indestructible little runabout with a sewing machine under the hood but they ran and ran and ran. The only problem with that car was that you needed to stand when using the brakes.


And the tendency for the floor panels under your feet to rust through. My mom had one as well when I was little and we called it the Flintstone mobile because of the holes in the floor. Occasionally if she was driving in wet conditions and drove over puddles water would spray the passenger.
 
2014-06-14 03:12:35 PM  

gaslight: Glitchwerks
If you don't know how to drive stick, just say so.


Counter-point:  I live my life a quarter mile at a time. Nothing else matters: not the mortgage, not the store, not my team and all their bullshiat. For those ten seconds or less, I'm free.

/I learned how to drive on a manual transmission car, but once I got an automatic I never looked back.
 
2014-06-14 03:17:12 PM  

Dingleberry Dickwad: Sniffers Row: Froman: There have definitely been some sketchy parking spaces here in Seattle that I wouldn't have even tried to get into (or out of) with a stick shift. Streets steep enough that it seems like if you stopped hard enough you would flip the car forward. I wouldn't mind putting in the effort to learn when my car finally dies (by then we might be out of oil anyway) but it's really nice to have versatility when you only own one vehicle, and not having to be concerned about whether you can handle the road or parking conditions.

I also get really aggravated being stuck in traffic, and not having to take care of shifting is really nice. I doubt it's very pleasant to be stuck in our relatively frequent and epic traffic jams on the freeways here with a manual.

PROTIP: When starting and stopping on hills, the parking brake (lightly applied at the right time), helps with that pesky coasting backwards thing.

Wrong wrong wrong wrong wrong!

The parking brake is exactly the wrong thing to do for preventing yourself from rolling backwards. Doing so either ties up your shifting hand, or your clutch foot depending on the type of parking brake you have. As I mentioned before, learning to be at a stop on a hill using the clutch and gas is how you stop facing upwards on a hill. If you find yourself using the brake excessively going down a hill then downshift, it will force your car to go down slower allowing you to use the brake less.


What the fark do you need your shifting hand for? Shifting into second?
 
2014-06-14 03:21:06 PM  

Dingleberry Dickwad: Sniffers Row: Froman: There have definitely been some sketchy parking spaces here in Seattle that I wouldn't have even tried to get into (or out of) with a stick shift. Streets steep enough that it seems like if you stopped hard enough you would flip the car forward. I wouldn't mind putting in the effort to learn when my car finally dies (by then we might be out of oil anyway) but it's really nice to have versatility when you only own one vehicle, and not having to be concerned about whether you can handle the road or parking conditions.

I also get really aggravated being stuck in traffic, and not having to take care of shifting is really nice. I doubt it's very pleasant to be stuck in our relatively frequent and epic traffic jams on the freeways here with a manual.

PROTIP: When starting and stopping on hills, the parking brake (lightly applied at the right time), helps with that pesky coasting backwards thing.

Wrong wrong wrong wrong wrong!

The parking brake is exactly the wrong thing to do for preventing yourself from rolling backwards. Doing so either ties up your shifting hand, or your clutch foot depending on the type of parking brake you have. As I mentioned before, learning to be at a stop on a hill using the clutch and gas is how you stop facing upwards on a hill. If you find yourself using the brake excessively going down a hill then downshift, it will force your car to go down slower allowing you to use the brake less.


So you sit there and ride the clutch at the red light, great idea!
If you're sitting at a red light, your car better be in first gear, ready to go. There is no taking away a shifting hand, as the parking brake is only use for that slight gap from where you release your foot off the brake, and move it to the gas. Trust me it works.
 
2014-06-14 03:27:12 PM  

Sniffers Row: Dingleberry Dickwad: Sniffers Row: Froman: There have definitely been some sketchy parking spaces here in Seattle that I wouldn't have even tried to get into (or out of) with a stick shift. Streets steep enough that it seems like if you stopped hard enough you would flip the car forward. I wouldn't mind putting in the effort to learn when my car finally dies (by then we might be out of oil anyway) but it's really nice to have versatility when you only own one vehicle, and not having to be concerned about whether you can handle the road or parking conditions.

I also get really aggravated being stuck in traffic, and not having to take care of shifting is really nice. I doubt it's very pleasant to be stuck in our relatively frequent and epic traffic jams on the freeways here with a manual.

PROTIP: When starting and stopping on hills, the parking brake (lightly applied at the right time), helps with that pesky coasting backwards thing.

Wrong wrong wrong wrong wrong!

The parking brake is exactly the wrong thing to do for preventing yourself from rolling backwards. Doing so either ties up your shifting hand, or your clutch foot depending on the type of parking brake you have. As I mentioned before, learning to be at a stop on a hill using the clutch and gas is how you stop facing upwards on a hill. If you find yourself using the brake excessively going down a hill then downshift, it will force your car to go down slower allowing you to use the brake less.

So you sit there and ride the clutch at the red light, great idea!
If you're sitting at a red light, your car better be in first gear, ready to go. There is no taking away a shifting hand, as the parking brake is only use for that slight gap from where you release your foot off the brake, and move it to the gas. Trust me it works.


It is actually a great idea. You just have to find that right balance between clutch and gas so that you aren't moving forwards or backwards. Depending on the grade of the hill you can do that with almost no throttle and just having the clutch partially engaged. When the light goes green you just give it more gas as you let off the clutch like you normally would and move forwards. No sliding backwards, no misjudging the parking brake to the point of engaging it too much to inhibit forwards movement when you want to go.
 
2014-06-14 03:35:05 PM  

Dingleberry Dickwad: Sniffers Row: Dingleberry Dickwad: Sniffers Row: Froman: There have definitely been some sketchy parking spaces here in Seattle that I wouldn't have even tried to get into (or out of) with a stick shift. Streets steep enough that it seems like if you stopped hard enough you would flip the car forward. I wouldn't mind putting in the effort to learn when my car finally dies (by then we might be out of oil anyway) but it's really nice to have versatility when you only own one vehicle, and not having to be concerned about whether you can handle the road or parking conditions.

I also get really aggravated being stuck in traffic, and not having to take care of shifting is really nice. I doubt it's very pleasant to be stuck in our relatively frequent and epic traffic jams on the freeways here with a manual.

PROTIP: When starting and stopping on hills, the parking brake (lightly applied at the right time), helps with that pesky coasting backwards thing.

Wrong wrong wrong wrong wrong!

The parking brake is exactly the wrong thing to do for preventing yourself from rolling backwards. Doing so either ties up your shifting hand, or your clutch foot depending on the type of parking brake you have. As I mentioned before, learning to be at a stop on a hill using the clutch and gas is how you stop facing upwards on a hill. If you find yourself using the brake excessively going down a hill then downshift, it will force your car to go down slower allowing you to use the brake less.

So you sit there and ride the clutch at the red light, great idea!
If you're sitting at a red light, your car better be in first gear, ready to go. There is no taking away a shifting hand, as the parking brake is only use for that slight gap from where you release your foot off the brake, and move it to the gas. Trust me it works.

It is actually a great idea. You just have to find that right balance between clutch and gas so that you aren't moving forwards or backwards. Depending on the grade of the hill you can do that with almost no throttle and just having the clutch partially engaged. When the light goes green you just give it more gas as you let off the clutch like you normally would and move forwards. No sliding backwards, no misjudging the parking brake to the point of engaging it too much to inhibit forwards movement when you want to go.


Getting a new clutch is fun!

In the fifteen years I have been driving stick, I've been on a hill steep enough to use the parking brake maybe four times. So it doesn't happen often, but it comes in handy when you need it. Sure, it is possible to start on any hill without it, but if the hill is really that steep, any method you use will absolutely be hard on your car, and for no reason. Part of being a good stick shift driver is knowing all the tricks, not just being able to brute force everything.

Look, if you aren't able to coordinate three things at once, and are willing to trash your clutch instead of learning, that's fine. But don't pretend that it is a "better way".
 
2014-06-14 03:39:10 PM  
If you live in the urban environment, driving a manual can be a pain in the butt. I used to commute to DC from Maryland's eastern Shore in my manual Passat TDI, rush hour traffic could be quite vexing. Now working in Naptown and the drive is much easier ; when i'm on home turf the manual is a blast to drive. Mrs. Shanteyman's car is a tiptronic A/T , so we get the best of both worlds, I guess.

I would doubt the authors claims that manuals get better fuel economy than A/T's these days. The advent of 6, 8, and 9 speed transmissions means the automatic is usually just as fuel efficient as the manual, at least in the VW's I sell.

The only advantage I would give the manual is that , if driven correctly, the clutch can outlast the automatic. Most A/t's will need to be rebuilt somewhere between 150k & 200k and that's become a $4K to 6K repair.
 
2014-06-14 03:39:20 PM  
Also, your statement implying that "just having the clutch partially engaged" is a good thing suggests that you have no farking clue how your car works.

Your clutch doesn't lose life when it is disengaged. It doesn't really lose life when it is engaged. All of its life is list when it is partially engaged. And using it to keep you in place at the stoplight on a hill will take thousands of miles worth of normal driving off its life.

But hey, at least you won't misjudge the parking brake!
 
2014-06-14 03:45:58 PM  
I used to believe that ability to drive a stick-shift should be required to obtain a driver's license. With the technology available today, now I believe that they should just revoke ALL licenses and require self-driving cars.
 
2014-06-14 03:46:59 PM  

Mitt Romneys Tax Return: Is this the thread where I get to brag that every car I've owned for the last 35 years has been a stick shift?

/   Drives a Yaris
//  Suck it, Nancy boys
/// Slashies come in threes


Both our cars are sticks. 2013 Corolla and 2014 Yaris. I'm not so sure the increased gas mileage is as much as TFA states and I'm not a snob about sticks, but they were cheaper than an automatic and are more fun to drive.
 
2014-06-14 03:58:48 PM  
Claiming that a manual sucks to drive in traffic isn't an argument against manuals, it's an argument against traffic.
 
2014-06-14 04:02:03 PM  
Grind em till you find em.
 
2014-06-14 04:02:13 PM  

Froman: There have definitely been some sketchy parking spaces here in Seattle that I wouldn't have even tried to get into (or out of) with a stick shift. Streets steep enough that it seems like if you stopped hard enough you would flip the car forward.


I don't get it. Are you just not confident about clutch control?

Hollie Maea: Getting a new clutch is fun!

In the fifteen years I have been driving stick, I've been on a hill steep enough to use the parking brake maybe four times. So it doesn't happen often, but it comes in handy when you need it. Sure, it is possible to start on any hill without it, but if the hill is really that steep, any method you use will absolutely be hard on your car, and for no reason. Part of being a good stick shift driver is knowing all the tricks, not just being able to brute force everything.


But you need to be able to hold the car steady on the biting point. When starting from a hill with the handbrake on, even.

Or junctions where you don't have a clear view of traffic on the road your joining/crossing (parked cars either side, closed* corner) where you have to creep-and-peep chiefly on the clutch.

Or stop-and-go traffic, where you'll stay in first and use clutch control to drive the car.

If you're doing big damage to your clutch, you'll smell it.

* A closed corner being one you must approach in first due to hedges/walls/whatever obscuring the view of the road you're entering.

shanteyman: I would doubt the authors claims that manuals get better fuel economy than A/T's these days. The advent of 6, 8, and 9 speed transmissions means the automatic is usually just as fuel efficient as the manual, at least in the VW's I sell.


Just out of curiosity are they traditional autos, or computer controlled double clutch manuals?

I'm no expert on auto transmissions, because UK. But am I wrong in thinking that it's the torque converter that saps power in a traditional auto? The DSG transmissions I'm aware of generally default to upshifting at low revs, which a human might not do, but also obviously helps with fuel economy.
 
2014-06-14 04:04:59 PM  

Glitchwerks: bingethinker: You're doing it wrong. You're probably shifting more than you need to.

Counter-point:  I never granny shift.  I'm always double clutchin' like you should.


Double clutching? Float them gears, lad!

/more trucks have automatics these days so gear floating is being phased out
//current truck has an automatic manual, computer controlled internal clutch
///never drove manual before getting my CDL and glad to be done with double clutching
 
2014-06-14 04:11:25 PM  
iron de havilland- Doesn't really matter whether it's a traditional 6 speed automatics or one of the DSG models, because there are six gears, the are able to hold the fuel economy. There may be a 1 MPG drop in city driving on some models with the traditional A/T. It's really more a question of how the transaxle ( front wheel drive ) is geared .
 
2014-06-14 04:12:10 PM  
What are these gears you are talking about? eCVT for the win.
 
2014-06-14 04:15:54 PM  

Hollie Maea: Also, your statement implying that "just having the clutch partially engaged" is a good thing suggests that you have no farking clue how your car works.

Your clutch doesn't lose life when it is disengaged. It doesn't really lose life when it is engaged. All of its life is list when it is partially engaged. And using it to keep you in place at the stoplight on a hill will take thousands of miles worth of normal driving off its life.

But hey, at least you won't misjudge the parking brake!


It's only taking thousands of miles off the life of the clutch if you're doing it often and using too much throttle.Yes it's still wearing on the clutch, but not as badly as you seem to think. You can also reduce the wear by doing the clutch method the last few seconds before the light turns green and having the clutch fully engaged while braking the rest of the time you're sitting there. I've only ever had to replace one clutch and that was on the 80 chevette I've mentioned upthread because it was already 14 years old when I got it with a worn clutch and the abuse I put it through learning how to drive stick. Besides, even using the parking brake method you still have to get going from a stop on that hill, parking brake or no parking brake, and that's still going to involve having the clutch partially engaged for a little while.
 
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  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

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