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(NBC News)   Bic to create a universal font based on everyone's handwriting. Will use handwriting samples from all five people who still know how to write in cursive   (nbcnews.com ) divider line
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1110 clicks; posted to Geek » on 13 Jun 2014 at 10:37 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-06-13 09:52:44 AM  
My 7 year old is learning to write it on her own insistence. She learned of it reading letters from grandparents who still write with it and so she asked for help to learn it and is now using it in her crafts and school work more and more. Not sure how beneficial it will be in her life, but it may be a unique skill that sets her apart, and it is something 'creative' she wants to do.
 
2014-06-13 10:34:39 AM  

InterruptingQuirk: My 7 year old is learning to write it on her own insistence. She learned of it reading letters from grandparents who still write with it and so she asked for help to learn it and is now using it in her crafts and school work more and more. Not sure how beneficial it will be in her life, but it may be a unique skill that sets her apart, and it is something 'creative' she wants to do.


Get your kid some calligraphy supplies - a nib holder, a few nibs, and some non-waterproof ink. It will make it way more fun. Look for foundational hand or italic hand templates online, and if she gets good at that, get her some stuff for roundhand.
 
2014-06-13 10:39:24 AM  

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: InterruptingQuirk: My 7 year old is learning to write it on her own insistence. She learned of it reading letters from grandparents who still write with it and so she asked for help to learn it and is now using it in her crafts and school work more and more. Not sure how beneficial it will be in her life, but it may be a unique skill that sets her apart, and it is something 'creative' she wants to do.

Get your kid some calligraphy supplies - a nib holder, a few nibs, and some non-waterproof ink. It will make it way more fun. Look for foundational hand or italic hand templates online, and if she gets good at that, get her some stuff for roundhand.


Wow. That's a lot of terminology I have never heard before. We'll check it out though, thanx!
 
2014-06-13 10:51:53 AM  
Pretty sure I still know, just I can't see a situation where you would use it. Even when I was a kid (about 3 decades ago) teaching cursive was done with an air of "here's something that accidentally got left in the school curriculum from the Victorian era so we have to teach it to you".
 
2014-06-13 10:52:28 AM  

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: and some non-waterproof ink


i5.photobucket.com

And a great skill to learn! It's still taught at Belgian schools. I use it for all my handwriting as an adult.
 
2014-06-13 11:04:47 AM  
Bic needs to look at Xerox for clues.
 
2014-06-13 11:06:59 AM  
I'm waiting for 4chan or somebody  to wreck the font now by flooding it with bad handwriting on purpose, thanks internet.
 
2014-06-13 11:24:45 AM  
Comique Sanz?
 
2014-06-13 11:28:50 AM  
Wow do I see a purple money dishwasher moment here!
 
2014-06-13 11:33:30 AM  
Man, I'm going to fark up this bell curve.  My handwriting looks like I hold the pen still and move the paper.

There's a reason I learned to type at such a young age, writing sucks.
 
2014-06-13 12:02:36 PM  

InterruptingQuirk: My 7 year old is learning to write it on her own insistence. She learned of it reading letters from grandparents who still write with it and so she asked for help to learn it and is now using it in her crafts and school work more and more. Not sure how beneficial it will be in her life, but it may be a unique skill that sets her apart, and it is something 'creative' she wants to do.


My 6 yr old son is doing this as well. He will watch youtube video's on cursive writing and Calligraphy and copy them.
Of course, he does the same with Russian, Japanese, Arabic, etc.

Anything to do with languages and writing, he'll spend hours watching.

We plan on getting him a calligraphy set, but he's a south paw and hamfists his pen, but hey, he's trying so I can't complain

.Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich:

Get your kid some calligraphy supplies - a nib holder, a few nibs, and some non-waterproof ink. It will make it way more fun. Look for foundational hand or italic hand templates online, and if she gets good at that, get her some stuff for roundhand.


will be using that info as well.
 
2014-06-13 12:12:33 PM  
This just in: learning to write cursive is an effective way of developing fine motor skills, which are useful in many tasks, not just writing.
 
2014-06-13 12:18:16 PM  
Don't we already have Dingbats?
 
2014-06-13 02:40:17 PM  
Cursive is still something I use when I wish to write a letter (ha!) or when making quick notes. Personally, I always wanted to learn Calligraphy, just because it looks so awesome.
 
2014-06-13 02:55:12 PM  

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: InterruptingQuirk: My 7 year old is learning to write it on her own insistence. She learned of it reading letters from grandparents who still write with it and so she asked for help to learn it and is now using it in her crafts and school work more and more. Not sure how beneficial it will be in her life, but it may be a unique skill that sets her apart, and it is something 'creative' she wants to do.

Get your kid some calligraphy supplies - a nib holder, a few nibs, and some non-waterproof ink. It will make it way more fun. Look for foundational hand or italic hand templates online, and if she gets good at that, get her some stuff for roundhand.


Honestly, it would be much more useful to teach her to use cursive as just a practical thing rather than as a calligraphy thing (most calligraphy doesn't use a script font anyway). Cursive is a faster and more efficient form of writing than printing, which is why it's been the vastly dominant form of handwriting in just about every language with a non symbolic alphabet for centuries.

I really hate the idea that cursive exists to look pretty, and that the logical extension is calligraphy. Cursive exists because it's a faster way to write. It's a practical thing, first and foremost. That's not to say calligraphy is bad, but it's most definitely not anywhere near as useful a skill as being able to write cursive well.
 
2014-06-13 03:12:24 PM  

xria: Pretty sure I still know, just I can't see a situation where you would use it. Even when I was a kid (about 3 decades ago) teaching cursive was done with an air of "here's something that accidentally got left in the school curriculum from the Victorian era so we have to teach it to you".


Yes, because being able to read and write in a historically dominant and still very widely used form of your own language is such an outdated skill.
 
2014-06-13 03:28:20 PM  

cptjeff: Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: InterruptingQuirk: My 7 year old is learning to write it on her own insistence. She learned of it reading letters from grandparents who still write with it and so she asked for help to learn it and is now using it in her crafts and school work more and more. Not sure how beneficial it will be in her life, but it may be a unique skill that sets her apart, and it is something 'creative' she wants to do.

Get your kid some calligraphy supplies - a nib holder, a few nibs, and some non-waterproof ink. It will make it way more fun. Look for foundational hand or italic hand templates online, and if she gets good at that, get her some stuff for roundhand.

Honestly, it would be much more useful to teach her to use cursive as just a practical thing rather than as a calligraphy thing (most calligraphy doesn't use a script font anyway). Cursive is a faster and more efficient form of writing than printing, which is why it's been the vastly dominant form of handwriting in just about every language with a non symbolic alphabet for centuries.

I really hate the idea that cursive exists to look pretty, and that the logical extension is calligraphy. Cursive exists because it's a faster way to write. It's a practical thing, first and foremost. That's not to say calligraphy is bad, but it's most definitely not anywhere near as useful a skill as being able to write cursive well.


You should hate that idea. Cursive is the EXACT OPPOSITE of calligraphy. Cursive hands were invented to sacrifice beauty and regularity for speed while retaining minimally necessary legibility. It was the "running" hand (hence the word, itself). When you wanted things to look pretty you did not use cursive. In America, it was first "round hand". This was replaced by "copperplate" in the 19th century. The successor to copperplate was "Spencerian". Spencerian pretty much died out (except for among professional letterers) in the 1920s-1930s, when the typewriter took over business correspondence. From that point, on, it was either block letters or cursive when it came to handwriting.

Spencerian was the last calligraphic hand used in the English language (at least in the USA), and it was effectively dead before WWII.
 
2014-06-13 03:29:10 PM  
So you who don't use cursive, what do your signatures look like? Do you block print your name or something?
 
2014-06-13 03:29:19 PM  

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: InterruptingQuirk: My 7 year old is learning to write it on her own insistence. She learned of it reading letters from grandparents who still write with it and so she asked for help to learn it and is now using it in her crafts and school work more and more. Not sure how beneficial it will be in her life, but it may be a unique skill that sets her apart, and it is something 'creative' she wants to do.

Get your kid some calligraphy supplies - a nib holder, a few nibs, and some non-waterproof ink. It will make it way more fun. Look for foundational hand or italic hand templates online, and if she gets good at that, get her some stuff for roundhand.


Those have nothing at all to do with cursive handwriting.
 
2014-06-13 04:18:44 PM  
Being able to actually write and having a nice pen (or pens) will continue to be one of the defining traits of the upper class versus those that either text or make ugly scribbles with cheap, disposable ballpoints.  Ditto with watches versus phone.
 
2014-06-13 04:29:07 PM  

LordZorch: Being able to actually write and having a nice pen (or pens) will continue to be one of the defining traits of the upper class versus those that either text or make ugly scribbles with cheap, disposable ballpoints.  Ditto with watches versus phone.


Don't forget monocles.  And spats.
 
2014-06-13 05:30:36 PM  
Actually, I enjoy it and practice it.

I know...dork.
Deal with it.
 
2014-06-13 09:54:48 PM  

Doc Batarang: So you who don't use cursive, what do your signatures look like? Do you block print your name or something?


Most people probably would answer with:

img.fark.net
 
2014-06-13 10:59:08 PM  

Unoriginal_Username: InterruptingQuirk: My 7 year old is learning to write it on her own insistence. She learned of it reading letters from grandparents who still write with it and so she asked for help to learn it and is now using it in her crafts and school work more and more. Not sure how beneficial it will be in her life, but it may be a unique skill that sets her apart, and it is something 'creative' she wants to do.

My 6 yr old son is doing this as well. He will watch youtube video's on cursive writing and Calligraphy and copy them.
Of course, he does the same with Russian, Japanese, Arabic, etc.

Anything to do with languages and writing, he'll spend hours watching.

We plan on getting him a calligraphy set, but he's a south paw and hamfists his pen, but hey, he's trying so I can't complain

.Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich:

Get your kid some calligraphy supplies - a nib holder, a few nibs, and some non-waterproof ink. It will make it way more fun. Look for foundational hand or italic hand templates online, and if she gets good at that, get her some stuff for roundhand.


will be using that info as well.


Get him a leftie calligraphy set. You can't pull the pen correctly when you essentially push it from the left.

/leftie and trained in this sort of thing
 
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