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(Mother Nature Network)   Which ancient beast once thought to be extinct can be found thriving across the Alaskan landscape? A) Woolly Mammoth B) Sabre-Toothed Tiger C) Blockbuster Video   (mnn.com) divider line 38
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5921 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 Jun 2014 at 12:07 PM (18 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-06-13 08:42:57 AM  
38.media.tumblr.com
 
2014-06-13 09:03:20 AM  
I would have soooo preferred it being the Woolly Mammoth or the Sabre-Toothed Tiger.  These are cool things.
 
2014-06-13 12:14:50 PM  
I liked blockbuster back in the day. The main problem I have with RedBox is the limited selection.

/ But, I also like battle axes, battleships and aircraft with radial piston engines.
 
2014-06-13 12:15:37 PM  

Sybarite: [38.media.tumblr.com image 500x279]


Came here to post this.
 
2014-06-13 12:16:30 PM  
These are people who don't know how to rent movies online, who don't want to pay $3 or $4 for a rental, or who lack an Internet connection capable of streaming a movie.

Then why are they going to Blockbuster?
 
2014-06-13 12:20:10 PM  
It sounds like their libraries need to get with the times and offer DVDs.
 
2014-06-13 12:31:50 PM  
There's 50 Blockbusters in Denmark alone.

There's mysterious posters in the stores hinting about some kind of new concept, also they're launching a service similar to Netflix.
 
2014-06-13 12:32:13 PM  
If you're not stuck up, there's money to be made on laggards.
 
2014-06-13 12:34:25 PM  

cgraves67: It sounds like their libraries need to get with the times and offer DVDs.


Fairbanks-North Star Borough Library System has a pretty good collection of movies, and UAF will let residents use their library and collection of movies, and they aren't bad selections at all.  But Fairbanks also has 2 Blockbusters, along with a ton of Redboxes, and the Blockbusters were always busy.  Internet speed, especially once you get outside of Fairbanks/North Pole or off Fort Wainwright/Eileson AFB sucks, so it's nice to have a full sized video store.  No matter how many DVDs your library stocks, it won't be as many as a full sized video store.
 
2014-06-13 12:38:29 PM  
Tech drives the consumer market and just like you can't get a VHS anymore soon the 4k TVs will drive out the HD sets.  4k movies would require 200 GB size discs and 8k which will follow on its heels just like 1080p pushed 720p out of the market will require 800 GB per movie sizing up from BluRays.  So if you watch just one 8k movie per day that means you will use 24,000 GB per month of internet streaming when a lot of plans today top out at 100 GB per month.  HVDs which had a roadmap to a 9 terabyte disc size but were quashed by the hard disc industry 10 years ago are going to be developed we'll all be going back to sneaker net and buying Termninator 2 and Blade Runner on 8k HVDs. So unless you're watching a black and white Stromberg Carlson with a round picture tube to see your RCA Video Disc collection then sooner rather than later you're going to be renting 8k movies.
 
2014-06-13 12:42:39 PM  
I wish we still had a Blockbuster around here, hell any video rental would do. I really don't see why it's no longer considered a viable business. You may not be able to make as much as you once could, but you should be able to turn a profit.
 
2014-06-13 12:43:21 PM  

OscarTamerz: Tech drives the consumer market and just like you can't get a VHS anymore soon the 4k TVs will drive out the HD sets.  4k movies would require 200 GB size discs and 8k which will follow on its heels just like 1080p pushed 720p out of the market will require 800 GB per movie sizing up from BluRays.  So if you watch just one 8k movie per day that means you will use 24,000 GB per month of internet streaming when a lot of plans today top out at 100 GB per month.  HVDs which had a roadmap to a 9 terabyte disc size but were quashed by the hard disc industry 10 years ago are going to be developed we'll all be going back to sneaker net and buying Termninator 2 and Blade Runner on 8k HVDs. So unless you're watching a black and white Stromberg Carlson with a round picture tube to see your RCA Video Disc collection then sooner rather than later you're going to be renting 8k movies.


When it comes to 'high definition,' they are seriously crowding the end of the diminishing returns curve at 4k resolution for anything small enough to fit in a normal-sized house.
 
2014-06-13 12:43:41 PM  
I still have two working VCR's for my old porn.
 
2014-06-13 12:44:58 PM  

spawn73: There's 50 Blockbusters in Denmark alone.

There's mysterious posters in the stores hinting about some kind of new concept, also they're launching a service similar to Netflix.


The Safeway in my neighborhood had a blue Blockbuster kiosk, that was basically a Redbox knock-off out front for awhile, but it was gone after a few months.
 
2014-06-13 12:46:24 PM  
@ Oscar Tameraz - What's to stop someone from compressing the movie to a manageable format like they do now?  Make it a gazillion terabytes,  big deal.  Your theory will never happen....ever.
 
2014-06-13 12:48:09 PM  

Sgt Otter: spawn73: There's 50 Blockbusters in Denmark alone.

There's mysterious posters in the stores hinting about some kind of new concept, also they're launching a service similar to Netflix.

The Safeway in my neighborhood had a blue Blockbuster kiosk, that was basically a Redbox knock-off out front for awhile, but it was gone after a few months.


That's because Coinstar (now called Outerwall and the owner of Redbox) paid $100MM for Blockbuster Express just to shut it down.
 
2014-06-13 12:48:53 PM  
Alaska I get given how expensive and unavailable broadband tend to be there.  Texas where another 20 BB stores still survive is a bit weirder, especially since the owner of those stores admits that many DVD makers will no longer sell to him in bulk like they used to so he just sends his employees to Wal-mart to buy the movies retail (apparently Walmart operates on near zero margins for newly released movies)
 
2014-06-13 01:01:38 PM  
That's great:  I still have a gift card.
Fark:  I live in Alabama.
 
2014-06-13 01:04:33 PM  
What's the key to Payne's success? Setting low prices, maintaining a large selection of movies and knowing his customers.

youdontsay.jpg
 
2014-06-13 01:07:48 PM  

Sybarite:


Fark, you never disappoint
 
2014-06-13 01:07:56 PM  

cgraves67: It sounds like their libraries need to get with the times and offer DVDs.


They do. They have for years. There's only so much space a library can dedicate, however. And with the Fairbanks library shutting down their mail services section, it's getting a little harder to get movies. Not sure if Anchorage is picking up the mail services slack, but I do know that Juneau is.
 
2014-06-13 01:16:16 PM  
I don't really understand why people that live in normal lower 48 cities use redbox either. A few redbox movies and you could have bought broadband service and netflix at the same time.

But really, it makes sense that Blockbuster still has a few thriving locations in extremely non urban areas like Alaska where broadband sucks and is expensive to boot.
 
2014-06-13 01:22:10 PM  

OscarTamerz: Tech drives the consumer market and just like you can't get a VHS anymore soon the 4k TVs will drive out the HD sets.  4k movies would require 200 GB size discs and 8k which will follow on its heels just like 1080p pushed 720p out of the market will require 800 GB per movie sizing up from BluRays.  So if you watch just one 8k movie per day that means you will use 24,000 GB per month of internet streaming when a lot of plans today top out at 100 GB per month.  HVDs which had a roadmap to a 9 terabyte disc size but were quashed by the hard disc industry 10 years ago are going to be developed we'll all be going back to sneaker net and buying Termninator 2 and Blade Runner on 8k HVDs. So unless you're watching a black and white Stromberg Carlson with a round picture tube to see your RCA Video Disc collection then sooner rather than later you're going to be renting 8k movies.


How many years has it been, and blu-ray still isn't ubiquitous. 4k and 8k are enthusiast wet dreams right now. It will be a decade or more before 1080p starts getting phased out.

And frankly, most of the U.S. is saddled with third wold quality broadband, which would cry mercy and slog to a halt if everyone streaming 720p compressed netflix shiat switched to 4k streaming. Hell, it will take our internet infrastructure a decade of upgrading to be able to handle that shiat.
 
2014-06-13 01:24:27 PM  
We have Family Video in central Indiana. It's great. I go there once a week. It's cheap, has a large selection of movies not available on Netflix or Amazon, and has a nice selection of pron.
 
2014-06-13 01:32:21 PM  

devildog123: it's nice to have a full sized video store


Agreed.  RedBox and the local library don't have large selections.  A lot of movies aren't available to rent via streaming.  Netflix via snail mail doesn't always satisfy the need to gorge on media over a weekend.

There are a couple of independent video rental stores within 15 miles of me, and they're huge and always packed in the evening.  The little ones appear to have all gone under.


Sgt Otter: The Safeway in my neighborhood had a blue Blockbuster kiosk, that was basically a Redbox knock-off out front for awhile, but it was gone after a few months.


I remember when most grocery stores had a small rental library at the front of the store.  Now they're all RedBox kiosks.


OscarTamerz: 4k movies would require 200 GB size discs


No.  Even though UHD 2160p has four times as many pixels as HD 1080p, it doesn't require four times the storage (unless you're talking about raw video used in processing).

For starters, any new UHD disc format will probably use either H.265 or VP9 as their compression codec, both of which are about 20-40% better at encoding than the H.264 codec used with Bluray discs today.  Second, as the resolution goes up, the difference between neighboring pixels tends to go down for a lot of areas, which makes them easier to compress (more efficient macroblock compression).

I've seen 2160p videos in VP9 that are under Bluray's maximum bitrate of 36Mbps and they look good.  There is no reason to think that they couldn't get away with 50GB and 100GB discs with a 2x bitrate of 72Mbps.
 
2014-06-13 01:38:22 PM  

uncleacid: I still have two working VCR's for my old porn.


Dad?
 
2014-06-13 01:40:05 PM  

ElLoco: OscarTamerz: Tech drives the consumer market and just like you can't get a VHS anymore soon the 4k TVs will drive out the HD sets.  4k movies would require 200 GB size discs and 8k which will follow on its heels just like 1080p pushed 720p out of the market will require 800 GB per movie sizing up from BluRays.  So if you watch just one 8k movie per day that means you will use 24,000 GB per month of internet streaming when a lot of plans today top out at 100 GB per month.  HVDs which had a roadmap to a 9 terabyte disc size but were quashed by the hard disc industry 10 years ago are going to be developed we'll all be going back to sneaker net and buying Termninator 2 and Blade Runner on 8k HVDs. So unless you're watching a black and white Stromberg Carlson with a round picture tube to see your RCA Video Disc collection then sooner rather than later you're going to be renting 8k movies.

When it comes to 'high definition,' they are seriously crowding the end of the diminishing returns curve at 4k resolution for anything small enough to fit in a normal-sized house.


They've got to push something. 3D flopped as a content in an attempt to further the "required" update cycle. 4K for home is the next attempt.
 
2014-06-13 01:53:43 PM  
Palin?
 
2014-06-13 02:05:33 PM  
img.youtube.com

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3TrPwOrf4sM

Indeed, those were dark and harrowing times when I was growing up.
 
2014-06-13 02:27:31 PM  

kling_klang_bed: [img.youtube.com image 480x360]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3TrPwOrf4sM

Indeed, those were dark and harrowing times when I was growing up.


It was also the one place I was guaranteed to be forgotten about in the computer if for whatever reason I lost a movie.

I lost one once.  Owed about 50 dollars.  The whole system crashed and erased every member in 4 different stores.  The rest didn't have any record I owed money at all.
 
2014-06-13 02:56:41 PM  

Dinjiin: I've seen 2160p videos in VP9 that are under Bluray's maximum bitrate of 36Mbps and they look good. There is no reason to think that they couldn't get away with 50GB and 100GB discs with a 2x bitrate of 72Mbps.


The reason to think it is because Sony and Panasonic, the BluRay proponents, came up with a 300 GB disc which is presumably some variation of HVD.  Compression means loss and no one with an 8k screen is going to want to watch a moving cubist painting.

neongoats: And frankly, most of the U.S. is saddled with third wold quality broadband, which would cry mercy and slog to a halt if everyone streaming 720p compressed netflix shiat switched to 4k streaming. Hell, it will take our internet infrastructure a decade of upgrading to be able to handle that shiat.


Yep, Blockbuster folded too fast and some other iteration of that rental model will be revived to handle the 8k movies that simply can't be pumped through our ubiquitous puny connections.  The question is what can deliver 8k streaming I mean how many optical fibers running would it take to deliver that level of quality?
 
2014-06-13 03:20:09 PM  

OscarTamerz: The reason to think it is because Sony and Panasonic, the BluRay proponents, came up with a 300 GB disc which is presumably some variation of HVD. Compression means loss and no one with an 8k screen is going to want to watch a moving cubist painting.


The ~30Mbps UHD VP9 videos I watched had almost no apparent macroblock compression artifacts.  Even ~30Mbps UHD H.264 videos had minimal artifacts.

Remember that the 36Mbps bitrate of Bluray was picked because it was high enough to allow for very high quality HD video using H.262 (MPEG2) in conjunction with several audio tracks.  It is total overkill for HD video using H.264.  To me, ~30Mbps for the video track appears to be just a little too low for UHD video using H.264, but is more than enough when using H.265 or VP9.

So based off of the UHD examples I've seen, I stand by my statement that 72Mbps (Bluray at 2X) would be enough for 2160p UHD.
 
2014-06-13 04:01:37 PM  
Breaking news:  Blockbusters that have a wide and deep selection rather the corporate policy of only stocking the dozen current hits that are never available can make a profit.
Blockbuster aimed for the proles market, like when Blockbuster refused to carry wide-screen DVDs because the maroons complained that the picture was too small, or wasted the screen they were paying for.

And when there are 4K HDTVs, these same proles will prefer watching the SD cable channels on it.
 
2014-06-13 04:26:13 PM  
Payne says his 13 stores in America's last frontier - which offer up to 15,000 titles - get 40,000 to 50,000 customers a week.

No farking way.
 
2014-06-13 05:44:56 PM  

Dinjiin: So based off of the UHD examples I've seen, I stand by my statement that 72Mbps (Bluray at 2X) would be enough for 2160p UHD.


But it's not 2160 but 4320p that makes up 8k innit mate so 72 MBps is goying to be right out. The other factor is that the prospect of glassless 3D is finally coming to fruition from what I saw at CES so 8k 3D may very well the door buster for the whole new rental market. After people repeatedly got screwed over by the incremental upgrades of 720p to 1080i to 1080p and Toshiba et al's HD-DVD losing to BluRay I don't think too many people will be buying 4k sets knowing 8k is right around the corner so the less BS the companies try to spread around the better and they'll realize they need to bring out the video displays and video players for 8k movies in relatively short order.which means they'll be competing directly with the streaming only services while revitalizing Netflix's original business model as well as Blockbuster's.
 
2014-06-13 09:51:21 PM  
Eureka, CA not only has video stores, it has competing chains of video stores.

/you can't explain that.
 
2014-06-14 01:31:53 AM  

OscarTamerz: 4320p that makes up 8k innit mate so 72 MBps is goying to be right out.


imageshack.us
For the home consumer market in North America, 8K/4320p would probably be a flop in the same way that 3D television was.  Since most people sit at least 10 feet away from their living room television, they'd need at least an 80 inch or larger screen to really take advantage of the higher resolution.  Not many people want a television that large.

So it comes down to how many people would pay a premium for disc playback hardware capable of 8K/4320p over 4K/2160p with their smaller televisions.  In North America, it isn't going to be a lot.  You might see higher adoption in Japan, but their weirdly obsessed with technical stats.  I'd be a niche like LaserDisc was.

So I'd bet good money that if 8K/4320p does end up in the next disc format, it'll probably be an optional resolution, and it might not be defined at first release.

Getting back to the nerd fight... the Bluray 2X bitrate of 72Mbps is more than enough for 4K/2160p.  It might not be enough for 8K/4320p, but you can always spin the disc faster.  Spinning at 4X gives you 144Mbps, and isn't so fast as to be terribly loud.  And this all assumes that they stick with a 405nm laser and don't go to something smaller.
 
2014-06-14 12:27:18 PM  
There are studies that show people can't tell the difference between SD and 1080p let alone 1080p and 720p but go to your local techmart and try to find a 720p so it isn't just the Japanese that are spec driven. The success of new tech like 3D depends on resolution too so glassless 3D may be the determining factor but even 4k will require a return to physical media rental given how much bandwidth Netflix eats up now.
 
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