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(Huffington Post)   10-year-old boy gets high school diploma, is now setting his sights on medical school, making people stop calling him "Doogie"   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 39
    More: Interesting, high school diploma  
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2759 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Jun 2014 at 12:48 PM (23 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



39 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-06-12 10:52:56 AM  
Pffft.  Big deal!  I did mine in 8.
 
2014-06-12 10:57:40 AM  
tengaku.net
 
2014-06-12 11:05:39 AM  
Who wants to break the news to him that he's way to smart to be President?
 
2014-06-12 12:54:15 PM  
I take this story more as a sign that we have lowered our standards.  No wonder employers are requiring Master's degrees to have a career as crew member or barista.
 
2014-06-12 12:54:38 PM  
Puberty is going to destroy his world.
 
2014-06-12 12:55:30 PM  
fremocentrist.com
 
2014-06-12 12:57:37 PM  
I'd send him to business school. Medical school never ends. Every time you think you're out, there's some other bullshiat multi-year program or crazy test you need to do.
 
2014-06-12 12:58:00 PM  
A scientist for a president? Depending on the science, I might vote for him
 
2014-06-12 12:59:44 PM  
Not only that but he has an ass like a...
 
2014-06-12 01:07:01 PM  
Imagine hitting 12 in a collage  full of horny coeds?
 
2014-06-12 01:10:13 PM  

Kukri187: Who wants to break the news to him that he's way to smart to be President?


Someone who knows how to use "too" in that sentence?
 
2014-06-12 01:16:31 PM  
But not smart enough to know that big pharma doesn't want "cure" anything, they just want to treat it.

/tinfoil
 
2014-06-12 01:18:43 PM  
I've always wondered how these things happen.  I realize that in this case it is home school, and in many cases, others have been home schooled as well.


However, when I was in highschool, the guidelines for graduation, as set by the state, were credits per subject.  And 1 year of a subject was one credit.

So when they said 4 credits of English, they meant 4 years.  They did not mean "4 years worth of work" or "An essay showing that you grasp all of the concepts".

How does this work?
 
2014-06-12 01:24:41 PM  
One of my classmates in college tested out of grade school at 10 (some state test that showed you could enter high school early), while he was also taking college level classes at night and during the summers. His father was a college professor, so I think his ability to get all the required classes in the limited timeframe was something his dad worked out. He got his GED at 10, Bachelors at 12, Masters in math at 14. First PhD in physics at 16. He was in my pre-med classes at the age of 16, which he had already started when he was finishing up his first physics degree. He was hoping for some space medicine type of job when it was all over. In the meantime, he said he had all the time in the world just to get degree after degree until he got bored with school. I've looked for his name in both space and medical publications, but I can't find him so I have a suspicion he probably turned out to just be a normal, high paid doctor of some sort.
 
2014-06-12 01:25:23 PM  
"The way my brain works is that when you give me something, information about that topic comes into my mind," he said. "I don't know what it is, but that's how it is for me."

Am I missing something, or does this kid actually think a normal thought process is something unique to him?
 
2014-06-12 01:35:49 PM  

The My Little Pony Killer: "The way my brain works is that when you give me something, information about that topic comes into my mind," he said. "I don't know what it is, but that's how it is for me."

Am I missing something, or does this kid actually think a normal thought process is something unique to him?


Sounds like he's already preprogramed with the information. I'm thinking alien hybrid.
 
2014-06-12 01:37:33 PM  
So, how are the rest of you liking God's little gene-pool consolation price?

/I'm not even sure if I spelled consolation correctly.
 
2014-06-12 01:37:47 PM  
My older-brother type of best friend when I was in my critical development years was a Villanova Valedictorian and is currently a NASA engineer.

I sincerely appreciate his efforts with me regardless.

That's all I got.
 
2014-06-12 01:49:34 PM  
Pfft. Gregory Smith did it by 9.
 
2014-06-12 01:51:04 PM  

stuffy: Imagine hitting 12 in a collage  full of horny coeds?


a4.ec-images.myspacecdn.com
 
2014-06-12 01:51:49 PM  
I'm super impressed that parents were able to "teach" their son to a perfect GPA and fulfill the requirements to the letter of what's required for him to "graduate" from high school. I see no problem with this, and no way that this could possibly backfire, in terms of his personal development.
 
2014-06-12 01:55:15 PM  

grinding_journalist: I'm super impressed that parents were able to "teach" their son to a perfect GPA and fulfill the requirements to the letter of what's required for him to "graduate" from high school. I see no problem with this, and no way that this could possibly backfire, in terms of his personal development.


I agree - I think home schooling is a Big Joke
 
2014-06-12 02:04:28 PM  

stuffy: Imagine hitting 12 in a collage  full of horny coeds?


Try to imagine hitting grade skool first.
 
2014-06-12 02:09:40 PM  
10-year-old boy gets high

Niiice.
 
2014-06-12 02:13:26 PM  
2.bp.blogspot.com
It's Doogie time!
 
2014-06-12 02:19:30 PM  

stuffy: Imagine hitting 12 in a collage  full of horny coeds?


I had the chance to do this, but didn't. Because it would've made me crazy and strange.

But while I was making that decision I got to walk around a few colleges. Honestly I don't even remember horning on all the chicks walking/sitting/laying around (although I'm sure I did), because they treated me like the cutest little thing they'd ever seen. Having a woman much older than yourself dote on you about how smart you are, joke about how short you are to be in college (teehee), and all that... it gets rid of the interest real quickly.

Not like anyone else my age would've had a chance (or known what he wanted to do) with them. But having the whole class turn and look at you like "You're our baby for the next hour lab!" is bonerkill.
 
2014-06-12 02:25:10 PM  

stuffy: Imagine hitting 12 in a collage  full of horny coeds?


Why stop at 12?
 
2014-06-12 02:35:35 PM  

The My Little Pony Killer: "The way my brain works is that when you give me something, information about that topic comes into my mind," he said. "I don't know what it is, but that's how it is for me."

Am I missing something, or does this kid actually think a normal thought process is something unique to him?


I am guessing that he meant something like, I was doing problems in an algebra textbook, and I thought about how I could do other things with it, and then I found out that was calculus.

//i wish him luck
///and slashies
 
2014-06-12 02:37:09 PM  
Were I his parents, I'd be so sad. These prodigies very often go insane and commit suicide at alarming rates. This is why we never hear anything about them as adults.
 
2014-06-12 02:53:50 PM  

JackieRabbit: Were I his parents, I'd be so sad. These prodigies very often go insane and commit suicide at alarming rates. This is why we never hear anything about them as adults.


I think it's less that and more that once you hit a certain age, the rest have caught up to you and you are only slightly above average. There are examples where that is not true, but I think that is more often the case.
 
2014-06-12 03:15:58 PM  
Way to go parents -- rob your kid of being able to be a kid. I'm sure those highly-developed social skills from studying at home will serve him well outside the womb.
 
2014-06-12 03:21:46 PM  

The My Little Pony Killer: "The way my brain works is that when you give me something, information about that topic comes into my mind," he said. "I don't know what it is, but that's how it is for me."

Am I missing something, or does this kid actually think a normal thought process is something unique to him?


Came here to say this.

Also

Tanishq is taking college courses and says he wants to be a scientist, but also president.

This kid has a lot to learn.
 
2014-06-12 03:23:21 PM  

pkellmey: JackieRabbit: Were I his parents, I'd be so sad. These prodigies very often go insane and commit suicide at alarming rates. This is why we never hear anything about them as adults.

I think it's less that and more that once you hit a certain age, the rest have caught up to you and you are only slightly above average. There are examples where that is not true, but I think that is more often the case.


You may be right about the kid who finishes HS at 14 and graduates from college at 17. Eventually everyone is going to catch up to him and he will be nothing special. But the kids who are true savants do indeed develop serious issues as adults.
 
2014-06-12 03:26:47 PM  

JackieRabbit: pkellmey: JackieRabbit: Were I his parents, I'd be so sad. These prodigies very often go insane and commit suicide at alarming rates. This is why we never hear anything about them as adults.

I think it's less that and more that once you hit a certain age, the rest have caught up to you and you are only slightly above average. There are examples where that is not true, but I think that is more often the case.

You may be right about the kid who finishes HS at 14 and graduates from college at 17. Eventually everyone is going to catch up to him and he will be nothing special. But the kids who are true savants do indeed develop serious issues as adults.


Imagine living in a world where everyone else was a Republican. That's what the world is like for those kids.
 
2014-06-12 04:20:30 PM  
And have ZERO interest in bagging:

i291.photobucket.com - i291.photobucket.com - i291.photobucket.com - i291.photobucket.com - i291.photobucket.com

/NTTAWWT
 
2014-06-12 05:41:30 PM  
A know-it all boy genius with an eidetic memory? Who couldn't relate to that?
 
2014-06-12 06:42:52 PM  
pbs.twimg.com
 
2014-06-12 11:25:51 PM  

Delta1212: JackieRabbit: pkellmey: JackieRabbit: Were I his parents, I'd be so sad. These prodigies very often go insane and commit suicide at alarming rates. This is why we never hear anything about them as adults.

I think it's less that and more that once you hit a certain age, the rest have caught up to you and you are only slightly above average. There are examples where that is not true, but I think that is more often the case.

You may be right about the kid who finishes HS at 14 and graduates from college at 17. Eventually everyone is going to catch up to him and he will be nothing special. But the kids who are true savants do indeed develop serious issues as adults.

Imagine living in a world where everyone else was a Republican. That's what the world is like for those kids.


Shouldn't we be doing something for these kids?  I mean, super-genius as a kid (ok, maybe not this one, I don't trust homeschool GED BS), how does that not continue into adulthood?  If nothing else, this is a group that is at least above average as an adult, if not genius level.

Smarts -> scientific advancement -> less dead babies.  Yes?
 
2014-06-13 05:07:25 PM  
I feel like allowing him to graduate at 10, even if he is a prodigy, is unfair to him and everyone else.

Unfair to him because he misses out on the social development that occurs during these years.  Unfair to everyone else because they have to spend the first 20% or so of their life in school no matter how smart they are.

What is the difference between this kid and a kid who graduates from school with straight A's and perfect ACT/SAT scores?
 
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