Do you have adblock enabled?
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(YouTube)   How to build your own PC (in 1991). Ah, the good times   (youtube.com) divider line 76
    More: Interesting  
•       •       •

2939 clicks; posted to Video » on 11 Jun 2014 at 11:51 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



76 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2014-06-11 09:19:53 AM  
Can I play Crysis 3 on this thing?
 
2014-06-11 09:39:30 AM  
The first computer I assembled was an Apple II clone back in '81.  It required actually snapping the chips onto the main board and installing the memory bus.  The chassis itself were plastic panels with velcro joints.  A whopping 4khz processor and 64k of memory.
 
2014-06-11 09:45:36 AM  
It's amazing how resilient early components were to ESD damage. That guy is pawing those parts like bear with a fresh fish.
 
2014-06-11 10:04:40 AM  
I don't understand, they don't even show the step where you buy parts on Newegg.
 
2014-06-11 11:33:14 AM  
They need to show PC building from the mid to late 90s where the guy tries to install and configure a 3d gaming card on a just released motherboard and subsequently takes a sledge hammer to his PC.
 
2014-06-11 11:44:21 AM  

UberDave: They need to show PC building from the mid to late 90s where the guy tries to install and configure a 3d gaming card on a just released motherboard and subsequently takes a sledge hammer to his PC.


Amen to that. When they first started putting heatsinks and fans on processors, that's when PC building got to be a pain in the ass.
 
2014-06-11 12:13:26 PM  

UberDave: They need to show PC building from the mid to late 90s where the guy tries to install and configure a 3d gaming card on a just released motherboard and subsequently takes a sledge hammer to his PC.


IRQ conflicts, expanded/extended memory problems, vesa drivers, mscdex, serial port mouse conflicts, midi joystick connections, sound blaster configs. Man, the early "plug and play" devices were such a pain in the ass. You really had to want it, to get that monster PC working.
 
2014-06-11 12:26:19 PM  

Perlin Noise: IRQ conflicts, expanded/extended memory problems, vesa drivers, mscdex, serial port mouse conflicts, midi joystick connections, sound blaster configs. Man, the early "plug and play" devices were such a pain in the ass. You really had to want it, to get that monster PC working.


You just got my eye twitching. I think I suffer from 90's-PC's PTSD. Thanks a lot.
 
2014-06-11 12:27:17 PM  
Just completed an AMD build. Had it put together with a b*tchin rad case in about 4 hours, and everything worked. Installed the OS and drivers and had it online two hours later, in between sips of beer.


the specs -

AMD FX-8320 Vishera 3.5 GHz (4.0 when overclocked) 8 core unlocked processor
ASUS M5A99FX Pro mainboard with everything
Kingston HyperX Blu DDR3 1600 16GB memory (32 GB worth)
EVGA GeForce GT640 128 bit PCIe 3.0 +HDCP video card (2 GB DDR3 onboard)
LG blu-ray drive/dvd burner (SATA)
LiteOn dvd burner (SATA)
WD Black series 2TB 7200 rpm SATA drive / WD Black series 3 TB 7200 rpm SATA drive
Thermaltake SMART series 650W modular p/s
Thermaltake Armor Reve Gene case (don't ask what this means, I have no idea)
2 keyboards
dual DELL U2413 monitors

Not bleeding edge, but more than enough for my purposes. Not a gamer, just a graphic designer.

A whole farking lot easier than my first build in 2000... IRQ settings, Sound blaster crap, DMA settings, DIP switches, video card conflicts, serial joystick ports... none of that here. Assemble, start, install, go.
/keeps belt onion close
//just in case
 
2014-06-11 12:31:30 PM  
FTFV: "This is now the Volkswagen of PC's."

Is that good or bad?
 
2014-06-11 12:32:23 PM  

Perlin Noise: UberDave: They need to show PC building from the mid to late 90s where the guy tries to install and configure a 3d gaming card on a just released motherboard and subsequently takes a sledge hammer to his PC.

IRQ conflicts, expanded/extended memory problems, vesa drivers, mscdex, serial port mouse conflicts, midi joystick connections, sound blaster configs. Man, the early "plug and play" devices were such a pain in the ass. You really had to want it, to get that monster PC working.


You want to have a quick nightmare?

I was tech support for a computer game company during that period. An online flight sim.

/oddly enough, that's about when I went bald ...
 
2014-06-11 12:33:08 PM  

Lando Lincoln: You just got my eye twitching. I think I suffer from 90's-PC's PTSD. Thanks a lot.


autoexec.bat!
config.sys!

Ooga Booooga!!!!
 
2014-06-11 12:39:55 PM  

Perlin Noise: UberDave: They need to show PC building from the mid to late 90s where the guy tries to install and configure a 3d gaming card on a just released motherboard and subsequently takes a sledge hammer to his PC.

IRQ conflicts, expanded/extended memory problems, vesa drivers, mscdex, serial port mouse conflicts, midi joystick connections, sound blaster configs. Man, the early "plug and play" devices were such a pain in the ass. You really had to want it, to get that monster PC working.


Yeah but once you got Quake or Mechwarrior 2 to run crash-free, it was all worth it!
 
2014-06-11 12:40:06 PM  

Perlin Noise: Lando Lincoln: You just got my eye twitching. I think I suffer from 90's-PC's PTSD. Thanks a lot.

autoexec.bat!
config.sys!

Ooga Booooga!!!!


You are pure evil. At least you didn't mention HIMEM.SYS and EMM386.EXE.
 
2014-06-11 12:43:01 PM  

GRCooper: Perlin Noise: UberDave: They need to show PC building from the mid to late 90s where the guy tries to install and configure a 3d gaming card on a just released motherboard and subsequently takes a sledge hammer to his PC.

IRQ conflicts, expanded/extended memory problems, vesa drivers, mscdex, serial port mouse conflicts, midi joystick connections, sound blaster configs. Man, the early "plug and play" devices were such a pain in the ass. You really had to want it, to get that monster PC working.

You want to have a quick nightmare?

I was tech support for a computer game company during that period. An online flight sim.

/oddly enough, that's about when I went bald ...


I did tech support for Hayes (modems) in the mid and late 80's. <eye twitch>
 
2014-06-11 12:43:22 PM  

Lando Lincoln: Perlin Noise: Lando Lincoln: You just got my eye twitching. I think I suffer from 90's-PC's PTSD. Thanks a lot.

autoexec.bat!
config.sys!

Ooga Booooga!!!!

You are pure evil. At least you didn't mention HIMEM.SYS and EMM386.EXE.


I remember games that would instruct you on what to edit in himem.sys.. fun times
 
2014-06-11 12:43:38 PM  

GRCooper: An online flight sim.


good god, man. Modems of the time were such a horrible pain in the ass. Especially the "PC modems" that ate up your processor/RAM resources and set their own interrupts, busting everything else you had installed. I can't even imagine what a pain that must have been. What game was it??? I don't remember any "online" flight sims of the time. The best multiplayer I could find were the MUDs over telnet.

Don't get me started talking about IPX/SPX or setting up a working TCP/IP stack. UGH! Home networks simply did not exist and you had to settle for wonky "internet sharing" over serial cable.

Thank god for routers and DHCP!! Before them, it took all day to set that shiat up.
 
2014-06-11 12:45:39 PM  

Perlin Noise: The best multiplayer I could find were the MUDs over telnet.


I lost a lot of time to MUDs in college. A LOT of time. I could even play it at home over my parents lackluster modem.

Although Bolo for the Apple was a pretty sweet multiplayer game at the time of the mid 1990s, it probably operated like sh*t on your standard modem.
 
2014-06-11 12:45:43 PM  

Lando Lincoln: At least you didn't mention HIMEM.SYS and EMM386.EXE


Oh god, it BURNS!
 
2014-06-11 12:48:56 PM  

bdub77: Although Bolo for the Apple was a pretty sweet multiplayer game at the time of the mid 1990s, it probably operated like sh*t on your standard modem.


OH ...don't forget Nettrek. Possibly the most innovative multiplayer game ever. Used to play that in the Sun labs here at Indiana University. I would kill entire weekends getting my ass kicked. That game is simply astounding for the time is was made.
 
2014-06-11 12:57:34 PM  

Perlin Noise: UGH! Home networks simply did not exist and you had to settle for wonky "internet sharing" over serial cable.

Thank god for routers and DHCP!! Before them, it took all day to set that shiat up.


This reminds me of early lan parties - cramming a bunch of friends in my apartment to set up and configure a token ring.  I was the only one technically inclined so I had to dick with everyone's PC while they sat around and drank beer and cracked jokes.  When I would ask for someone to hand me a terminator, you would hear multiple people talking in Arnold Schwarzenegger accents for the next 10 minutes.
 
2014-06-11 01:06:02 PM  

UberDave: Perlin Noise: UGH! Home networks simply did not exist and you had to settle for wonky "internet sharing" over serial cable.

Thank god for routers and DHCP!! Before them, it took all day to set that shiat up.

This reminds me of early lan parties - cramming a bunch of friends in my apartment to set up and configure a token ring.  I was the only one technically inclined so I had to dick with everyone's PC while they sat around and drank beer and cracked jokes.  When I would ask for someone to hand me a terminator, you would hear multiple people talking in Arnold Schwarzenegger accents for the next 10 minutes.


I remember when playing Duke Nukem with more than two players was like seeing the face of God. Anyone remember Kali? Man, that was some neat stuff back then, when it worked.
 
2014-06-11 01:09:31 PM  
Ah yes, playing multiplayer doom over the serial cable...good times.

ISA cards with IRQ / DMA conflicts that you had to set jumpers...although, in some ways it was better because once PCI came along you lost the control to fix some of those conflicts if two cards wanted the same ranges.

Also, all the good old graphics options (Tandy / CGA / Hercules)...
 
2014-06-11 01:11:52 PM  

Perlin Noise: UberDave: Perlin Noise: UGH! Home networks simply did not exist and you had to settle for wonky "internet sharing" over serial cable.

Thank god for routers and DHCP!! Before them, it took all day to set that shiat up.

This reminds me of early lan parties - cramming a bunch of friends in my apartment to set up and configure a token ring.  I was the only one technically inclined so I had to dick with everyone's PC while they sat around and drank beer and cracked jokes.  When I would ask for someone to hand me a terminator, you would hear multiple people talking in Arnold Schwarzenegger accents for the next 10 minutes.

I remember when playing Duke Nukem with more than two players was like seeing the face of God. Anyone remember Kali? Man, that was some neat stuff back then, when it worked.


The problem with Duke Nukem multiplayer is that it didn't scale up to hard enough when you had 3-4 players.  Doom 2 was much better with everyone rejuv'ing.  And frickin' impossible after a certain point.
 
2014-06-11 01:18:49 PM  
Did he set the jumper switches on those controller cards?

/Press the Turbo button for 66MHz goodness!
 
2014-06-11 01:19:57 PM  
You can't handle the speed of this:

www.rarecpus.com

/i miss overdrive cpus
 
2014-06-11 01:21:32 PM  

Perlin Noise: Lando Lincoln: You just got my eye twitching. I think I suffer from 90's-PC's PTSD. Thanks a lot.

autoexec.bat!
config.sys!

Ooga Booooga!!!!


MEM386.EXE baby.

I got your IRQ conflict RIGHT HERE!
 
2014-06-11 01:21:33 PM  
Man, I remember building multiple profiles in QEMM to get the right memory settings to play individual games.
 
2014-06-11 01:22:48 PM  

InterruptingQuirk: You can't handle the speed of this:

[www.rarecpus.com image 600x481]

/i miss overdrive cpus


My 1.77MHz TRS-80 Mod I farts in your general direction.
 
2014-06-11 01:22:52 PM  
I used to bribe my roommate to fix mine...  I would have sledgehammer'ed it.

But to have dual VoodooII SLI... oh god, it wasn't worth the headache at all...  :(  I miss back when I could just DM until midnight, go to work and veg out until I could go home and do it again.
 
2014-06-11 01:28:37 PM  
Where's the Turbo button?

I was selling RAM for +/- $125 a Mb in '90.
 
2014-06-11 01:35:31 PM  

bdub77: I don't understand, they don't even show the step where you buy parts on Newegg.


I don't think there were too many interwebs back then...
 
2014-06-11 01:42:32 PM  

InterruptingQuirk: You can't handle the speed of this:

[www.rarecpus.com image 600x481]

/i miss overdrive cpus


upload.wikimedia.org
Still got one of these sitting around. It was in my first PC (I was an Amiga guy before that).
 
2014-06-11 02:03:19 PM  

Perlin Noise: InterruptingQuirk: You can't handle the speed of this:

[www.rarecpus.com image 600x481]

/i miss overdrive cpus

[upload.wikimedia.org image 200x200]
Still got one of these sitting around. It was in my first PC (I was an Amiga guy before that).


Cyrix was such crap. I pity you. Their version of MMX, MediaGX! What a load of codswallop. I had to take care of future-to-be inlaws computer that had a Cyrix system in it. I built them a new computer that year just so I didn't have to touch that one again.
 
2014-06-11 02:07:17 PM  

Perlin Noise: InterruptingQuirk: You can't handle the speed of this:

[www.rarecpus.com image 600x481]

/i miss overdrive cpus

[upload.wikimedia.org image 200x200]
Still got one of these sitting around. It was in my first PC (I was an Amiga guy before that).


My First computer was an Atari 130XE, my second was an AMIGA 500.
I wish I could get some of the old games emulated from those.

Remember M.U.L.E. on the Atari? (4 PLAYERS!)  (I actually did find an Online Emulator for that one.)

On the Amiga, there was a game that was a space ship fighting game. You chose your ship and fought other people. Each ship had different weapons. The one I remember was a ship that let out drones that barked like dogs. I cannot remember the name of the game thought.

ANother cool game on Amiga was The Killing Game Show.
 
2014-06-11 02:08:00 PM  

Perlin Noise: GRCooper: An online flight sim.

good god, man. Modems of the time were such a horrible pain in the ass. Especially the "PC modems" that ate up your processor/RAM resources and set their own interrupts, busting everything else you had installed. I can't even imagine what a pain that must have been. What game was it??? I don't remember any "online" flight sims of the time. The best multiplayer I could find were the MUDs over telnet.

Don't get me started talking about IPX/SPX or setting up a working TCP/IP stack. UGH! Home networks simply did not exist and you had to settle for wonky "internet sharing" over serial cable.

Thank god for routers and DHCP!! Before them, it took all day to set that shiat up.


Air Warrior

It ran from 86ish to 2001. I was support from 95-98. Lucky me, I got to be sole support when we went live on AOL.

Imagine trying to talk your average 1996 AOL user through all of the nightmares listed above. I'm gonna go lay down in the fetal position now, until the shakes have gone.
 
2014-06-11 02:35:46 PM  

GRCooper: Perlin Noise: GRCooper: An online flight sim.

good god, man. Modems of the time were such a horrible pain in the ass. Especially the "PC modems" that ate up your processor/RAM resources and set their own interrupts, busting everything else you had installed. I can't even imagine what a pain that must have been. What game was it??? I don't remember any "online" flight sims of the time. The best multiplayer I could find were the MUDs over telnet.

Don't get me started talking about IPX/SPX or setting up a working TCP/IP stack. UGH! Home networks simply did not exist and you had to settle for wonky "internet sharing" over serial cable.

Thank god for routers and DHCP!! Before them, it took all day to set that shiat up.

Air Warrior

It ran from 86ish to 2001. I was support from 95-98. Lucky me, I got to be sole support when we went live on AOL.

Imagine trying to talk your average 1996 AOL user through all of the nightmares listed above. I'm gonna go lay down in the fetal position now, until the shakes have gone.


Oh god... I am going to go lay down just imagining that.
1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-06-11 02:44:54 PM  

GRCooper: Perlin Noise: GRCooper: An online flight sim.

good god, man. Modems of the time were such a horrible pain in the ass. Especially the "PC modems" that ate up your processor/RAM resources and set their own interrupts, busting everything else you had installed. I can't even imagine what a pain that must have been. What game was it??? I don't remember any "online" flight sims of the time. The best multiplayer I could find were the MUDs over telnet.

Don't get me started talking about IPX/SPX or setting up a working TCP/IP stack. UGH! Home networks simply did not exist and you had to settle for wonky "internet sharing" over serial cable.

Thank god for routers and DHCP!! Before them, it took all day to set that shiat up.

Air Warrior

It ran from 86ish to 2001. I was support from 95-98. Lucky me, I got to be sole support when we went live on AOL.

Imagine trying to talk your average 1996 AOL user through all of the nightmares listed above. I'm gonna go lay down in the fetal position now, until the shakes have gone.


old Air Warrior vet here.. played on the Atari ST and Amiga 500 back when it was on the GEnie network (if I remember right, that was like eons ago)

I even met the dev's one year and a convention in Dayton
 
2014-06-11 02:49:46 PM  
That video card fit in the slot like shiat..  Back quarter was sticking out still
 
2014-06-11 03:00:24 PM  

rewind2846: bdub77: I don't understand, they don't even show the step where you buy parts on Newegg.

I don't think there were too many interwebs back then...


t3.gstatic.com
 
2014-06-11 03:05:07 PM  
old Air Warrior vet here.. played on the Atari ST and Amiga 500 back when it was on the GEnie network (if I remember right, that was like eons ago)

I even met the dev's one year and a convention in Dayton


Then we probably met

/'moggy'
 
2014-06-11 03:10:39 PM  

GRCooper: old Air Warrior vet here.. played on the Atari ST and Amiga 500 back when it was on the GEnie network (if I remember right, that was like eons ago)

I even met the dev's one year and a convention in Dayton

Then we probably met

/'moggy'


flew under the name 'Noid'

a bit of history there, I was working for Dominos pizza at that time...
 
2014-06-11 03:15:49 PM  

GRCooper: Air Warrior

It ran from 86ish to 2001. I was support from 95-98. Lucky me, I got to be sole support when we went live on AOL.

Imagine trying to talk your average 1996 AOL user through all of the nightmares listed above. I'm gonna go lay down in the fetal position now, until the shakes have gone.


Looked it up and that game looks friggin' awesome. Way before its time...
 
2014-06-11 03:20:08 PM  

Perlin Noise: GRCooper: Air Warrior

It ran from 86ish to 2001. I was support from 95-98. Lucky me, I got to be sole support when we went live on AOL.

Imagine trying to talk your average 1996 AOL user through all of the nightmares listed above. I'm gonna go lay down in the fetal position now, until the shakes have gone.

Looked it up and that game looks friggin' awesome. Way before its time...


yea, had me staying up waaaay to late at night, and paying phone bills on top of it.. no local dialup access for GEnie at that time.
 
2014-06-11 04:02:53 PM  
That build he said would cost about $700. I love how I can still build a pretty nice system for about $700,
 
2014-06-11 04:10:17 PM  

Perlin Noise: UberDave: They need to show PC building from the mid to late 90s where the guy tries to install and configure a 3d gaming card on a just released motherboard and subsequently takes a sledge hammer to his PC.

IRQ conflicts, expanded/extended memory problems, vesa drivers, mscdex, serial port mouse conflicts, midi joystick connections, sound blaster configs. Man, the early "plug and play" devices were such a pain in the ass. You really had to want it, to get that monster PC working.


All the manual clicking of the ports seems to have slipped his mind...
Had to smile at the 200MB hard drive...

Remember when I got my new, top of the line system at the beginning of `98 in college - biggest hard drive they had was 6.4GB and when I got it, friends at college repeatedly said, "WOW, you'll never fill that up!"

/GEEEEEEEEEEEEZZZ!!!! Now I have multiple 1, 2 and 3TB external drives and quite a few USB "jump" drives in the 160GB area
//never heard a custom builder called a "home brewer" before this video...
 
2014-06-11 04:11:45 PM  
Thank god I'm not the only one having bad flashbacks.
 
2014-06-11 04:13:01 PM  

Perlin Noise: GRCooper: Air Warrior

It ran from 86ish to 2001. I was support from 95-98. Lucky me, I got to be sole support when we went live on AOL.

Imagine trying to talk your average 1996 AOL user through all of the nightmares listed above. I'm gonna go lay down in the fetal position now, until the shakes have gone.

Looked it up and that game looks friggin' awesome. Way before its time...


Got all nostalgic and looked it up on YouTube.  Brought back a few memories.

This was from a beta test we ran sometime in the mid-90's.  Me262's weren't usually available online, so we enabled them in order to get a bunch of testers to show up.

I'm 90% sure this is me flying:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_gFuqEDTpzc

/the out of cockpit view wasn't available online, only in the offline replay
//no AIs - every other plane was flown by other players
 
2014-06-11 04:15:12 PM  
Oh, come on,  most DSDD floppy drives could read SSSD.
 
2014-06-11 05:17:42 PM  
It was a big deal in my house when my dad got a laptop for work. Every day he left it home, I'd be deathmatching with a friend and a serial cable. Anyone remember DWANGO?
 
Displayed 50 of 76 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
Advertisement
On Twitter






In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report