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(Gizmodo)   NASA designs a real life Starship Enterprise that can travel at speeds faster than light without breaking Einstein's theories   (sploid.gizmodo.com) divider line 109
    More: Cool, Miguel Alcubierre, interferometry, interplanetary travel, interstellar travel, faster than light, economic bubble, test beds, nuclear reactions  
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8289 clicks; posted to Geek » on 11 Jun 2014 at 1:24 AM (10 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-06-10 11:41:57 PM
Last I heard he still had a null result with his test rig.

That said, at least he is starting with concepts that we can observe in nature resulting in FTL relative velocities.
 
2014-06-10 11:49:18 PM
Needs torpedo tubes ...
 
2014-06-11 12:15:24 AM
That's lovely CGI wanking.  Us physicists would appreciate a bit less magic and a bit more mathematics.  Not too much; I'm just a physicist.
 
2014-06-11 12:26:51 AM
zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
no they didnt
 
2014-06-11 12:51:57 AM
That's a beautiful dream.

Won't be much more than that for quite a while, if ever.
 
2014-06-11 01:37:49 AM
It's not news, it's *fart noises*
 
2014-06-11 01:53:13 AM
I liked the little saucer shaped ship.
www.freewebs.com
 
2014-06-11 02:00:33 AM
Oh look, it's:

"Hey everybody... We figured out that instead of needing billions of tons of a non-existent unobtainable substance to fuel our warp drive, we only need 500 kilograms of a non-existent unobtainable substance! We're almost there!"

Now with pretty, meaningless drawings.  Can we stop with these stupid warp drive articles already?
 
2014-06-11 02:09:47 AM
I'm using that same substance to design my Stargate.
 
2014-06-11 02:13:19 AM
I'm assuming the saucer-shaped bit is supposed to be an artificial gravity centrifuge. In which case it's MUCH too small, and the rotational speeds needed to produce meaningful gravity for the crew would make even the most demented carny feel a bit woozy.

/with such a small radius, your head would experience noticeably different gravity from your feet
 
2014-06-11 02:27:59 AM
i.imgur.com
 
2014-06-11 02:29:15 AM
cdn.hark.com
 
2014-06-11 02:31:39 AM
Meh, light speed is too slow and it's already been done
cdn.ebaumsworld.com

/what we need is ludicrous speed
//GO!
 
2014-06-11 02:32:32 AM
First, we need to get off planet cheaply.

How about figuring a way to nullify the Higgs field so you have a massless object? Doc Smith's idea seems more usable now that we understand the origin of mass.
 
2014-06-11 02:58:17 AM

wildcardjack: First, we need to get off planet cheaply.

How about figuring a way to nullify the Higgs field so you have a massless object? Doc Smith's idea seems more usable now that we understand the origin of mass.


THE HIGGS FIELD DOES NOT WORK THAT WAY.

img.fark.net
 
2014-06-11 03:08:43 AM
Will we be able to 3D print it?
 
2014-06-11 03:18:43 AM
As a non-physicist, I find it funny that the way to avoid violating Einstein's theories is to bend the farking universe in half.

That said, maybe we should work on mastering the basics - like sending a probe to another planet without losing track of it - before we think about putting a McDonald's on Alpha Centauri.
 
2014-06-11 03:25:12 AM
wildcardjack: First, we need to get off planet cheaply.

Working on it right now. If I could just figure out how to bend the girders for the superstructure?

img.trekmovie.com
 
2014-06-11 03:26:26 AM
It is powered by the basic principal that no speed, not even light, is faster than that by which a funding increase request from NASA is rejected outright. Placing a spacecraft in front of such a proposal propels the vehicle to speeds hitherto unimagined by physicists and engineers.
 
2014-06-11 03:36:48 AM
I'm glad that folks are seriously working on what I'd likely to be the best chance for humans to travel the universe. However, if I'm not mistaken to warp space around a craft so it can travel a truly staggeringly immense amount of energy is needed. Wasn't it something like the mass of Jupiter converted directly to energy? That kind of energy requirement would be a problem which might be insurmountable for this technology to actually be used in a craft.
 
2014-06-11 03:39:23 AM
Screw the experimental physics; a ring frame and inner space for crew is a fantastic idea for a ship that could maintain 'gravity', which seems to be the second biggest problem facing space travel (the first being dosh). Just mount the external cameras, engines, and whatnot on the frame.

I suppose the FTL travel would be a nice bonus.
 
2014-06-11 03:39:38 AM
I've become too cynical to suspend disbelief here, what with the gods damn teabaggers destroying everything. T_T
 
2014-06-11 03:53:30 AM

ImpendingCynic: That said, maybe we should work on mastering the basics - like sending a probe to another planet without losing track of it - before we think about putting a McDonald's on Alpha Centauri.


Why would we put a McDonald's on a star?  Wouldn't it get too hot?
 
2014-06-11 04:39:47 AM

Radak: ImpendingCynic: That said, maybe we should work on mastering the basics - like sending a probe to another planet without losing track of it - before we think about putting a McDonald's on Alpha Centauri.

Why would we put a McDonald's on a star?  Wouldn't it get too hot?


Great way to keep their burgers hot without a heat lamp.
 
2014-06-11 04:40:16 AM
He had a theory.  Now he has a theory and pretty CGI pictures.  While, sure, that's progress of a sort, I wouldn't call it "designing" a FTL ship.

Radak: ImpendingCynic: That said, maybe we should work on mastering the basics - like sending a probe to another planet without losing track of it - before we think about putting a McDonald's on Alpha Centauri.

Why would we put a McDonald's on a star?  Wouldn't it get too hot?


I can imagine the lawsuits now.  "The star is kept warmer than the industry standard."  "There were no warning labels stating that the star is hot."  "McDonalds failed in its duty to prevent idiots from flying into the star."
 
2014-06-11 04:51:28 AM
"It went supernova and melted my slacks to my labia."
 
2014-06-11 05:11:45 AM

Z-clipped: Oh look, it's:

"Hey everybody... We figured out that instead of needing billions of tons of a non-existent unobtainable substance to fuel our warp drive, we only need 500 kilograms of a non-existent unobtainable substance! We're almost there!"

Now with pretty, meaningless drawings.  Can we stop with these stupid warp drive articles already?


I know a place you can find unobtainium.
 
2014-06-11 05:42:37 AM

Emposter: I can imagine the lawsuits now.  "The star is kept warmer than the industry standard."  "There were no warning labels stating that the star is hot."  "McDonalds failed in its duty to prevent idiots from flying into the star."


I like your warped sense of humor.
 
2014-06-11 05:47:58 AM
It makes me happy to just think about it. Someday, maybe humanity will manage to become the contagious disease we clearly were meant to be.
 
2014-06-11 06:19:47 AM

Radak: ImpendingCynic: That said, maybe we should work on mastering the basics - like sending a probe to another planet without losing track of it - before we think about putting a McDonald's on Alpha Centauri.

Why would we put a McDonald's on a star?  Wouldn't it get too hot?


It's only open at night.
 
2014-06-11 06:50:35 AM
His "breakthrough" is proving that creating the bubble doesn't require a gigantic pile of a form of matter that doesn't exist, only a very small pile of matter that doesn't exist. It doesn't address the fact that creating the bubble breaks the causal relationship between objects on either side of the bubble- once you start an Alcubierre drive, you can't stop it.
 
2014-06-11 07:26:31 AM
Cytokine Storm:

img.fark.net

"Also, never enslaved for sex by Klingons or painfully dissolved by a carnivorous ooze"

Just saying.
 
2014-06-11 07:26:32 AM

Emposter: Radak: ImpendingCynic: That said, maybe we should work on mastering the basics - like sending a probe to another planet without losing track of it - before we think about putting a McDonald's on Alpha Centauri.

Why would we put a McDonald's on a star?  Wouldn't it get too hot?

I can imagine the lawsuits now.  "The star is kept warmer than the industry standard."  "There were no warning labels stating that the star is hot."  "McDonalds failed in its duty to prevent idiots from flying into the star."


Asimov wrote a story about a star so not-quite-hot that you could land on it. I think life had developed there instead of on the planets orbiting it. I would've sworn it was called an "infrasun" but now I can't find that story, "infrastar" also gives me nothing.
 
2014-06-11 07:38:05 AM
Fix the cigarette lighter.
 
2014-06-11 07:41:51 AM

ImpendingCynic: As a non-physicist, I find it funny that the way to avoid violating Einstein's theories is to bend the farking universe in half.

That said, maybe we should work on mastering the basics - like sending a probe to another planet without losing track of it - before we think about putting a McDonald's on Alpha Centauri.


What if I told you the key to instantaneous travel is not to move the ship but instead change the entire coordinates of the universe around the ship?
 
2014-06-11 07:42:27 AM
I still prefer to travel across the continuum by TARDIS. If you're going to use massive, nearly-inconceivable amounts of exotic energy and matter to build a bubble to skip across the surface of the universe, at least you can make it an entire mini-universe to hold all your shiat and outfit it for comfort and style. USING MATHEMATICS!
 
2014-06-11 07:44:13 AM

Kittypie070: I've become too cynical to suspend disbelief here, what with the gods damn teabaggers destroying everything. T_T


The does seem to be a battle between people who want to go to the stars and people who want to go to the bronze age.
 
2014-06-11 07:56:15 AM

ImpendingCynic: As a non-physicist, I find it funny that the way to avoid violating Einstein's theories is to bend the farking universe in half.


It's not as funny as it sounds. We can observe the universe being bent by stars through gravitational lensing in images and even experience here on earth with a pair of VERY accurate clocks and an airplane ride.

So we know we CAN bend the universe. A warp drive would just be a more focused crease.
 
2014-06-11 07:59:02 AM

Tyrone Slothrop: Kittypie070: I've become too cynical to suspend disbelief here, what with the gods damn teabaggers destroying everything. T_T

The does seem to be a battle between people who want to go to the stars and people who want to go to the bronze age.


I just don't understand :(
 
2014-06-11 08:03:03 AM

ImpendingCynic: As a non-physicist, I find it funny that the way to avoid violating Einstein's theories is to bend the farking universe in half.

That said, maybe we should work on mastering the basics - like sending a probe to another planet without losing track of it - before we think about putting a McDonald's on Alpha Centauri.


i.imgur.com

"Human behavior is economic behavior. The particulars may vary but competition for limited resources remains a constant. Need as well as greed has followed us to the stars and the rewards of wealth still await those wise enough to recognize this deep thrumming of our common pulse."
 
2014-06-11 08:13:20 AM

t3knomanser: His "breakthrough" is proving that creating the bubble doesn't require a gigantic pile of a form of matter that doesn't exist, only a very small pile of matter that doesn't exist. It doesn't address the fact that creating the bubble breaks the causal relationship between objects on either side of the bubble- once you start an Alcubierre drive, you can't stop it.


But isn't it still an interesting development worthy of mention and discussion? So yesterday there were at least 5 things wrong with the idea, today there are only 4. It's still progress.

I think everyone is too cynical.
 
2014-06-11 08:18:33 AM

Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: I'm assuming the saucer-shaped bit is supposed to be an artificial gravity centrifuge. In which case it's MUCH too small, and the rotational speeds needed to produce meaningful gravity for the crew would make even the most demented carny feel a bit woozy.

/with such a small radius, your head would experience noticeably different gravity from your feet


RTFA.  The rings are the equivalent of warp nacelles, not rotational rings.
 
2014-06-11 08:20:45 AM

mongbiohazard: I'm glad that folks are seriously working on what I'd likely to be the best chance for humans to travel the universe. However, if I'm not mistaken to warp space around a craft so it can travel a truly staggeringly immense amount of energy is needed. Wasn't it something like the mass of Jupiter converted directly to energy? That kind of energy requirement would be a problem which might be insurmountable for this technology to actually be used in a craft.


There's a link in TFA about this:  http://gizmodo.com/5942634/nasa-starts-development-of-real-life-star- t rek-warp-drive

Apparently the theoretical size of the theoretical matter needed is down to 500kg.
 
2014-06-11 08:21:19 AM

Slaxl: So yesterday there were at least 5 things wrong with the idea, today there are only 4. It's still progress.


The entire premise depends on made up kinds of matter. All we've done is changed the amount of made up bullshiat required to power our spaceship. That's not progress, that's mental masturbation.
 
2014-06-11 08:21:58 AM

GDubDub: Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: I'm assuming the saucer-shaped bit is supposed to be an artificial gravity centrifuge. In which case it's MUCH too small, and the rotational speeds needed to produce meaningful gravity for the crew would make even the most demented carny feel a bit woozy.

/with such a small radius, your head would experience noticeably different gravity from your feet

RTFA.  The rings are the equivalent of warp nacelles, not rotational rings.


RTFP.  He means the saucer-shaped bow of the craft.  ;p

i.kinja-img.com
 
2014-06-11 08:24:00 AM
I thought one of the prereqs to forming the space/time bubble of the Alcubierre drive was you needed to do it outside of a major gravity well (like a planet) that is already bending space.
Or did I just get that from reading too much sci-fi?
 
2014-06-11 08:25:30 AM

Parthenogenetic: GDubDub: Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: I'm assuming the saucer-shaped bit is supposed to be an artificial gravity centrifuge. In which case it's MUCH too small, and the rotational speeds needed to produce meaningful gravity for the crew would make even the most demented carny feel a bit woozy.

/with such a small radius, your head would experience noticeably different gravity from your feet

RTFA.  The rings are the equivalent of warp nacelles, not rotational rings.

RTFP.  He means the saucer-shaped bow of the craft.  ;p

[i.kinja-img.com image 636x355]


D'oh!

Well in that case, I'm going to guess the saucer-shaped bow exists in the concept purely for the fact:  It looks cool.
 
2014-06-11 08:27:18 AM

Radak: ImpendingCynic: That said, maybe we should work on mastering the basics - like sending a probe to another planet without losing track of it - before we think about putting a McDonald's on Alpha Centauri.

Why would we put a McDonald's on a star?  Wouldn't it get too hot?



They could put it on Proxima Centauri. It's only about 53% as hot. Plus it's a little closer.
 
2014-06-11 08:39:25 AM

Kittypie070: I've become too cynical to suspend disbelief here, what with the gods damn teabaggers destroying everything. T_T


NASA's budget has been slashed under both democratic and republican administrations. They've both made big promises that are left unfunded or cancelled shortly afterwards.   Much as I usually side with conservatives, they've made no less of a mess than their opponents.

Politicians love to promise shiat, but in general they don't believe in space or science projects until something happens that embarrasses them.

/Which is why I'm rooting for Elon.
/He's making efficient use of the commercial portion in our space budget.
/Causing furtherembarrassment to the old contractors and their political backers.
/Seriously Lockheed/Boeing, its taking you ten years to get a ship to orbit EVEN WITH advanced materials and computers?
/Your parents did this with
slide rules in five.
/I totally expected RLV's and flying saucers from you by now...
 
2014-06-11 08:41:10 AM

wingedkat: It makes me happy to just think about it. Someday, maybe humanity will manage to become the contagious disease we clearly were meant to be.


I saw the movie matrix where it exlpained that humans are just a virus.  does that meet your criteria?
 
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