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(WMTW Portland)   If firefighters have to enter your house through a second story window and then shovel a path through trash to try to rescue your sorry ass, you may be a hoarder   (wmtw.com) divider line 50
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5186 clicks; posted to Main » on 10 Jun 2014 at 9:40 PM (27 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-06-10 08:29:24 PM  
The very shiatty slideshow in the link contains many photos and inline ads. Here are the few worth looking at, I'm not sure they were worth it.

img.fark.net
img.fark.net
img.fark.net
img.fark.net
img.fark.net

The handwritten sign is interesting though.
 
2014-06-10 08:59:28 PM  
The inevitable end of capitalism.
 
2014-06-10 09:42:26 PM  
iv1.lisimg.com

Better to just let it burn, Arnie. They'd just laugh at her.
 
2014-06-10 09:45:03 PM  
Volunteer firefighter for years here (so was hardinparamedic above I believe) - never saw anything like this - can't imagine heaps of burning trash while inside a structure fire. It's bad enough.
 
2014-06-10 09:45:37 PM  

WhoopAssWayne: Volunteer firefighter for years here (so was hardinparamedic above I believe) - never saw anything like this - can't imagine heaps of burning trash while inside a structure fire. It's bad enough.


Yeah. I can safely say I've never seen anything like this.

Although I have cut a 800 pound man out of his bedroom.
 
2014-06-10 09:47:32 PM  
"Baril said the house will condemned."


... harsh. finally a sentient house, and it's condemned
 
2014-06-10 09:49:04 PM  
How does a house get like that? I have a 2 year rule on everything except my hurricane supplies and business records, if I haven't used it in two years it gets tossed

/and after 5 years the records get scanned to archive and the physical copys get tossed
 
2014-06-10 09:56:56 PM  

hardinparamedic: Although I have cut a 800 pound man out of his bedroom.


Last Friday, I assisted an elderly lady, who at top speed - went Duke's of Hazzard over a 60 ft treacherous cliff. Didn't roll it, to our amazement. Banged up a little, refused assistance, just wanted a ride home (which she got.) The car/suv had busted out suspension, flat tires, busted windows, but had not been rolled. Could not believe it. The police chief (it's a small town / public safety office deal) said she'd been having problems with losing consciousness but the courts would not yank her license yet. If you could see this cliff/dropoff - remember I'm in the mountains here in WNC - wow.
 
2014-06-10 10:03:34 PM  
Best way to deal with a compulsive hoarder bringing down your property value? Gasoline, a whisky bottle and a oily rag works just fine.
 
2014-06-10 10:06:11 PM  
Jeffrey Baril said the man who died was 66.

Well that hoarding problem has been sorted.  We can use this technique to sort out other hoarding situations.


.
 
2014-06-10 10:10:23 PM  
 
2014-06-10 10:16:09 PM  
Even this guy managed to have a girlfriend
 
2014-06-10 10:17:33 PM  

Publikwerks: https://www[* image 7x13]google[* image 7x13]com/maps/[[nospam-﹫-backwards] image 7x13]44[* image 7x13]090159,-70.217461,3a,41.1y,258.12h,85 . 38t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1s8R1spPpgdyl7K3nITlwSng!2e0

Come on guys - it looks like it is for sale!


#233 a couple of houses down (to the right) doesn't look too clean either.
 
2014-06-10 10:33:28 PM  
I got to watch firefighters chainsaw through a roof to get to a hoarder's fire. That was popcorn-worthy. Was there only because we were sent out to the area for work that day.
 
2014-06-10 10:36:09 PM  
Someone with a mental problem - let's pick on them


/dnrta
 
2014-06-10 10:45:57 PM  

hardinparamedic: WhoopAssWayne: Volunteer firefighter for years here (so was hardinparamedic above I believe) - never saw anything like this - can't imagine heaps of burning trash while inside a structure fire. It's bad enough.

Yeah. I can safely say I've never seen anything like this.

Although I have cut a 800 pound man out of his bedroom.


How many pieces did you get him into?
 
2014-06-10 10:46:19 PM  
Just for the people who are confused -- the place wasn't on fire, they just needed the ladders to find a way into the place.
 
2014-06-10 10:48:50 PM  
unattended death =/= rescue
 
2014-06-10 10:50:02 PM  

feanorn: I got to watch firefighters chainsaw through a roof to get to a hoarder's fire. That was popcorn-worthy. Was there only because we were sent out to the area for work that day.


You always chainsaw through the roof. It's called ventilation. It removes the pressure of the gases building up inside.
 
2014-06-10 10:50:40 PM  

ekdikeo4: Just for the people who are confused -- the place wasn't on fire, they just needed the ladders to find a way into the place.


It would've been a "major loss" if that hole had burned down. My wife watches those Hoarders shows on the occasion, some of those places just need to be firebombed and forgotten.
 
2014-06-10 10:50:49 PM  

PiffMan420: Best way to deal with a compulsive hoarder bringing down your property value? Gasoline, a whisky bottle and a oily rag works just fine.


Wow you are an asshole.
 
2014-06-10 10:52:50 PM  

ozzie_stu: Someone with a mental problem - let's pick on them


/dnrta


When emergency services are forced to deal with your shiathole firetrap or hazmat site, you're a public menace. I try to be sympathic to the plight of the mentally ill, but I have serious difficulty showing empathy to individuals who refuse to seek any form of treatment and endanger the public at large.
 
2014-06-10 10:54:41 PM  

bearcats1983: ekdikeo4: Just for the people who are confused -- the place wasn't on fire, they just needed the ladders to find a way into the place.

It would've been a "major loss" if that hole had burned down. My wife watches those Hoarders shows on the occasion, some of those places just need to be firebombed and forgotten.


It probably wouldn't have burned down at all because shiat was packed in too densely.
 
2014-06-10 10:57:38 PM  

Publikwerks: https://www[* image 7x13]google[* image 7x13]com/maps/[[nospam-﹫-backwards] image 7x13]44[* image 7x13]090159,-70.217461,3a,41.1y,258.12h,85 . 38t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1s8R1spPpgdyl7K3nITlwSng!2e0

Come on guys - it looks like it is for sale!


oh man, look on one of the porches across the street
 
2014-06-10 11:06:31 PM  

owlholder: oh man, look on one of the porches across the street


Hey biatchtits! Put on a shirt!
 
2014-06-10 11:06:57 PM  

owlholder: Publikwerks: https://www[* image 7x13]google[* image 7x13]com/maps/[[nospam-﹫-backwards] image 7x13]44[* image 7x13]090159,-70.217461,3a,41.1y,258.12h,85 . 38t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1s8R1spPpgdyl7K3nITlwSng!2e0

Come on guys - it looks like it is for sale!

oh man, look on one of the porches across the street


LOL.  Swinging past the knees!!!!  Welcome to the goodie room.
 
2014-06-10 11:30:31 PM  
I see some nice tits across the street, gimmie few more beers and my best cthulhu tie....
 
2014-06-10 11:34:54 PM  

cretinbob: unattended death =/= rescue


I thought they said he died waiting for them to get to him. Did that mean they couldn't get inside the house in time to save him? Or that he died while they were still in transit?  It's a shame a person's own mental illness would be what does him in in this way.
 
2014-06-10 11:36:58 PM  
My Grandma used to be that way. When I was growing up, we'd visit, anfd I'd see all kinds of old and strange stuff. about 10 years ago, when she fell and broke her shoulder, her kids gathered and cleaned her house. They got rid of a whole double axle trailer of stuff. Replaced her fixtures, it looked really nice. They worked over 2 weeks on it. Once she got home, she was mad all her stuff was gone. This isn't high dollar stuff either. She then proceeded to "Re-nest", getting comfortable with a new load of junk. Thankfully she was put in a home, had a stroke, and died shortly after. The whole episode was really sad, damaging both myself and my sister. I don't think any more of "Maybe I can use this later." I just throw it away. My youngest is almost in college, and we rented a dumpster to clean out the house. It's amazing how much junk you picj up slowly on A\a daily basis, then having to get rid of it.
 
2014-06-11 12:22:40 AM  
I was married to a hoarder. There was no winning a "can we throw this away" discussion/argument. You have no idea how attached they get to their stuff, and how miserable they can make you if you go behind their back and throw something away (if they notice it. It's a gamble.)

It sucks. It was one of the primary reasons I left. I got tired of being embarrassed of my home. I got tired of having few places to sit. I got tired of having to walk on a path through the place. I got sick of never knowing if I was going to get into a huge nasty fight because I threw out a piece of junk mail, some old moldy food in the fridge, a label from a can, or the can itself.

We once got into a very big, very nasty fight because I threw away a pile of dirt that was on the counter. DIRT. It was apparently "special" dirt, and I was a thoughtless monster for discarding her "special" dirt while she wasn't home. I was accused of going behind her back to destroy and discard her things. IT WAS DIRT!!! A small pile of dirt just sitting on the kitchen counter! Not even good topsoil, but cruddy-looking dirt!

When I left, I streamlined my life and possessions. Everything I own can now fit in a small U-Haul trailer. Previously, when we moved from one place to the next (a nightmare every time) we needed the biggest truck they rented, plus we filled up two cars with more junk. Most of what was in those vehicles was stuff any sane person would toss in the dumpster... but not her. I was required to lug her broken junk down many flights of stairs and load it in the truck. Stacks of newspapers were driven across the state as if they were priceless heirlooms. Bags and bags of ancient, smelly, ill-fitting clothing were lugged up and down the stairs. Dysfunctional appliances she fished from the dumpster and brought home were packed and carried to our new home. Several boxes contained just disposable food containers and packaging.

On top of that, there were many things I wasn't allowed to open or use... Stuff we got as wedding gifts that HAD to remain unopened, in a closet, and NEVER be used, for years and years! Pots, pans, dishes, appliances-- Things we could actually use! They were apparently HERS (despite me being at the wedding too) and I had to leave them in the closet, unopened, unless I wanted a big argument.

My first few months living away from her, it was both a huge relief and a bit of an adjustment living in a house without stacks of junk everywhere... Living somewhere where I wasn't griped at and threatened for throwing away a soup can with the label still on it... Being able to go to the kitchen or bathroom at night without having to memorize the "safe" path through the mathom.

So to anyone out there who is dating a hoarder (and contrary to what some people believe, it's not always possible to know this before getting deeply involved) all I can say is RUN. RUN AWAY. RUN AND NEVER EVER LOOK BACK.
 
2014-06-11 12:27:35 AM  
Seriously... I get sick to my stomach from flashbacks when I see those pictures.

How the fark  did I live in that for almost half of my life at the time I finally left?
 
2014-06-11 12:53:08 AM  

Nix Nightbird: Seriously... I get sick to my stomach from flashbacks when I see those pictures.

How the fark  did I live in that for almost half of my life at the time I finally left?


My grandma on my mom's side was a hoarder. You wouldn't have known it just seeing the ground level of the house.

She died when I was nine.

The f*cking basement? Took all of the extended relatives a full week to clean it. As my mother tells it they found everything from unopened board games from the fifties to a ping pong table they didn't know existed to one of those old-style phones from way back in the day when phones were rented, not outright owned. Sad part is that if it hadn't gone into such disarray some of that would have been worth something. No, really. Sad part is that some of that could have been worth money if it wasn't for the rats.

Weird hearing about these things as an adult when you were just a kid after grandma died.
 
2014-06-11 01:16:05 AM  

Nix Nightbird: Seriously... I get sick to my stomach from flashbacks when I see those pictures.

How the fark  did I live in that for almost half of my life at the time I finally left?


It's amazing what a person can get used to.

The parental unit has developed some hoarding tendencies as she's gotten older. It's extremely difficult to get her to part with anything and she won't stop buying the most useless junk. The money would be better spent paying off her credit card bills instead of adding to the clutter. The basement is an absolute disaster at this point.

It drives me nuts. I want to live in a clean house again.  :(
 
2014-06-11 01:58:25 AM  
PiffMan420

ozzie_stu: Someone with a mental problem - let's pick on them

/dnrta

When emergency services are forced to deal with your shiathole firetrap or hazmat site, you're a public menace. I try to be sympathic to the plight of the mentally ill, but I have serious difficulty showing empathy to individuals who refuse to seek any form of treatment and endanger the public at large.


I'm not disagreeing with your point - but I wouldn't blame the person with the mental illness for not seeking help anymore than I would blame an epileptic for having a fit while we're in a restaurant.  Rather it comes down to family and dept of social services (human services) to be there for him.  If necessary to get a court order to act on his behalf if he can't be deemed able to act in his own best interest.
 
2014-06-11 02:04:52 AM  
If the first responders couldn't get in the door, how did they get food?
 
2014-06-11 02:22:20 AM  

Nix Nightbird: So to anyone out there who is dating a hoarder (and contrary to what some people believe, it's not always possible to know this before getting deeply involved) all I can say is RUN. RUN AWAY. RUN AND NEVER EVER LOOK BACK.



When hoarding TV shows came out, I realized I was looking into a possible future.While most of my home was neat (almost obsessively so) I had special paper. When I moved, and I realized that I had a gigantic cube of special papers in banker boxes that fully occupied an entire room. I defended the piles and would scold the BF if he touched or threatened to throw them out. I spent a full year or more reducing the piles. I sorted the special receipt piles looking for the "special receipts" I had to keep. Before I could overcome the anxiety of throwing them away I had to go through each piece of paper 3 times. In order to insure there was no takesies-backsies, I disposed into a locked box owned by a security company that sent the documents to an incinerator. I knew if there was a possibility of retrieving from a garbage can, I would, for a 4th sort through.Right now, the kitchen table is still occupied, but it's not full of special paper just freaking disorganized. Every couple of months I try to kill the disorder but can never get it to zero.The other weird thing was that I hoarded cleaning products. Once I realized that I had 8 bottles of bleach etc, I put in a rule that new cleaning products could never be purchased unless I was down to one unit, and that last unit had to be nearly empty. Just in time inventory management. I put this rule in place in 2008. I still have inventory that dates prior to 2008. I've done the same with food purchases to cut down on waste.I've scanned and eliminated physical books. Scanned and eliminated DVDs/CDs. Financial records too. If something can be used and I'm just keeping it to keep it safe, I try to use it up, even if there isn't really a pressing need.Describing all this, I get this weird sensation like biting on tinfoil. My home is completely clear and neat. The only space that isn't usable is the dining tabletop. But I know that in the face of mental decline, or brain damage, or clinical depression, I could find myself needing a backhoe to get me out of my home. To some extent I've transformed the anxiety about my stuff into an anxiety about why I have the stuff. So I'm constantly prowling to reduce. I'm super nervous about the number of cardboard boxes I have at this moment.If you think you (or somebody you know) have a problem, I really recommend the Hoarding: Buried Alive series, particularly the 1st season. That season had less dramatic confrontation with the hoarder, and instead showed how they taught the hoarder to focus on the decision making process and how to focus on one little bit at a time. Because that is what it took for me, start in a spot, focus just on that spot, and the decision tree is (1) keep, (2) donate, (3) sell, (4) recycle, (5) dispose.
 
2014-06-11 02:22:51 AM  

jrg1199: If the first responders couldn't get in the door, how did they get food?


You become self sufficient once you realize the amount of delicious mushrooms grow from the expired cheese that grew from the yogurt, that grew from the mayo like substance that was left in the 1/4 full half gallon of milk in the fridge. Don't forget about drinking your urine.  It is also good for at least 6-7 digestions.  Clean up the mess with your stack for TV Guides from the mid 1990's, and take a dump next to your bed to keep yourself warm while you sleep.

/
//
///
////
//Hoarding slashies for later in case the internet reaches its maximum number of characters.
 
2014-06-11 02:41:14 AM  

schpanky: cretinbob: unattended death =/= rescue

I thought they said he died waiting for them to get to him. Did that mean they couldn't get inside the house in time to save him? Or that he died while they were still in transit?  It's a shame a person's own mental illness would be what does him in in this way.


I was still hovering over the link that called it an unattended. There is a good chance he was circling the drain and done for already.
When it's your day, it's your day.

Having to tunnel through all the stuff isn't exactly an excuse, but I haven't seen the place and it wasn't my call. There had to be some kind of path to him.
 
2014-06-11 02:46:55 AM  

CruJones: Even this guy managed to have a girlfriend


They say there's a lid for every pot. Although I've been floating around without a top for quite some time now.
 
2014-06-11 03:52:46 AM  
I know more about hoarding than I ever wanted to know, having dealt with a hoarder apartment once, and from what I know from my hubby when he used to do cleanouts.  For my hubby, one in question was when the Hoarders show folks showed up, and they immediately called the Health Department before they even passed through the first room in the home.  That house was condemned and torn down.

I will agree that they are often incapable of helping themselves even when they claim they don't want to live that way.  If friends, family or just anyone who is aware doesn't step in, they stay put and things get worse until something like this article happens.

The one in question I experienced was on Housing Assistance, and even they knew he needed to be in managed care, but they felt sorry for him and thought somehow he'd miraculously recover from it one day because he claimed he wasn't always that way, and he didn't want to always be that way.  During the course of working on the apartment, I found out that every place he's lived in for years he was off the books evicted for health and safety hazards so he wouldn't lose housing assistance, and the property owners didn't have to worry their place would be condemned.  It's a ridiculous cycle.

Details that follow might be too much for some with delicate constitutions or who happens to be reading Fark while eating.  Feel free to skip.

Before I say anything else about the place I encountered, I want to point out that the hoarder only lived there for just over a year.  One year.

The hoarding was primarily trash, and a lot of things that were wrecked by said trash and bugs and vermin.  This hoarder also had a pet dog he never house trained.  Pizza boxes stacked floor to ceiling, often still with uneaten food inside.  Contractor garbage bag half filled with trash and half belongings he was apparently "still sorting through" from the last place he'd been thrown out.  He would make cigarettes from butts he would find in ash cans or on the sidewalks in town, and there were used filters, papers and tobacco pieces everywhere.  The smell was made worse because many things that had moisture retained a lot of it due to how compressed things were.  Mold everywhere.  Tons of dead maggots and some quite alive and squirming.  Clouds of drain gnats and the like would rise up in your face when you were trying to grab stuff to bag it to get it outside.  Of course, the dog poop everywhere too.  Sometimes ground into things from being walked on, sometimes smeared.  Also, there was vomit all over.  Apparently he would drink until his disability stipend ran out, then his body would detox for the other two weeks or more of the month.  All rooms in the home, save a two by two square foot block in front of the door were like this--even the bathroom.

As far as "paths" go, I can say that there was sort of a path, made of pizza crusts and other bits of delivered food/containers, assorted junk that hasn't been "put away" to their idea of it, mostly empty beer cans brimming with bugs, etc..  The path was so deep, it threatened to spill over into my knee high wellie boots to use it.  We had to shovel it out just like the firemen in the article. I still feel bad for the fellow who slipped in it and fell.  It's like trying to climb out of a ball crawl.  There's a reason cleanups like this require full protection suits and masks.  Even with gear, all my clothes went immediately into the washer every day as soon as I got home before I showered because the smell permeated everything.

The clean up after he was moved essentially turned into a demo and replace.  I'm talking not just carpet and padding, but even the subfloor in some places where the dog had a "path". We also had to replace insulation between that floor and the ceiling below due to fluids leaking down through the floor boards in the living room.  (Mostly smelled like beer, but who knows what it was.)

At the time, I needed the money, and had no idea what I was getting myself into.  I'll never take work like that again unless I have only five cents to my name.

I hope I never, ever develop whatever mis-wiring causes that.  It's a terrible thing.

Probably TMI for most folks, but, well, this is Fark.
 
2014-06-11 06:41:57 AM  
Anyone reading this thread who has a hoarder in their life may find help (or at least confirmation you're not going crazy) at http://childrenofhoarders.com/wordpress/ .

/father is a hoarder.
 
2014-06-11 07:52:55 AM  
Helped a buddy choose an apartment in a really cool split up house one time.  The landlord / owner made him a deal that he'd pay for renovation of the place if my friend would help clean it out and do some of the work.

The place had been occupied by a hoarder.  Not especially dirty / disgusting, but a hoarder of magazines and newspapers.  It was a literal (ha!) maze through the house... I cannot believe the place hadn't burned down.  The bathtub was full of magazines... I have no idea how many, must have been 10,000 in the unit.  I guess the previous tenant didn't bathe, or bathed at other peoples houses.

At the end of the day, pretty much everything got thrown away including all the carpets, most of the kitchen gear (cabinets, fridge, sink), etc.  Under the carpets were hardwood floors which got refinished.  The whole place was painted and primed.  Exposed brick was cleaned.  It ended up being an amazing place... by far the best unit in the house.

/CSB
 
2014-06-11 08:43:56 AM  

cretinbob: feanorn: I got to watch firefighters chainsaw through a roof to get to a hoarder's fire. That was popcorn-worthy. Was there only because we were sent out to the area for work that day.

You always chainsaw through the roof. It's called ventilation. It removes the pressure of the gases building up inside.


No, no - that was their way in.
 
2014-06-11 09:30:41 AM  

PiffMan420: Best way to deal with a compulsive hoarder bringing down your property value? Gasoline, a whisky bottle and a oily rag works just fine.


Especially if you want your next residence to serve Spam sandwiches and you get a nice tossed salad from the guy in cell B62
 
2014-06-11 10:52:45 AM  

Nix Nightbird: I was married to a hoarder. There was no winning a "can we throw this away" discussion/argument. You have no idea how attached they get to their stuff, and how miserable they can make you if you go behind their back and throw something away (if they notice it. It's a gamble.)


This is the craziest part about hoarding to me.  The idea that you own something that is extremely valuable to you, yet you have no idea where it is.  If someone threw it away and never told you you wouldn't notice.  All you know is that if you find out it is gone you will be very angry and upset.

to me a hoarder isn't just someone with piles of stuff everywhere, It's a manipulative person who forms an unhealthy attachment to crap.  They want their enablers to feel bad for them because they crave the attention.
 
2014-06-11 10:56:27 AM  

PiffMan420: Best way to deal with a compulsive hoarder bringing down your property value? Gasoline, a whisky bottle and a oily rag works just fine.


It would make the show 'Hoarders" more interesting

/"We've called in local pyromaniac 8 year old Josh Mason to help Cheryl with her hoarding problem"
//It would make it a lot shorter too.
 
2014-06-11 11:18:22 AM  

feanorn: cretinbob: feanorn: I got to watch firefighters chainsaw through a roof to get to a hoarder's fire. That was popcorn-worthy. Was there only because we were sent out to the area for work that day.

You always chainsaw through the roof. It's called ventilation. It removes the pressure of the gases building up inside.

No, no - that was their way in.


Oh......
 
2014-06-11 12:13:15 PM  
My sister's friend is a hoarder.

A few years ago, she lost her home, and a half-dozen of us (foolishly) helped her move, attempting to get her to reduce the amount of stuff she had. It took us a full day to fill a 26-foot moving truck to capacity, and *still* hadn't removed half of what was in her home. Most of the time spent moving was actually spent arguing with her about what to keep, and what she should leave behind or throw away.

Even after we were finished, there were still piles of stuff lying all over the place in the house, and the entire basement and garage were still clogged floor to ceiling with old boxes of broken junk, old clothes, and who knows what else.

i at least give her credit for not hoarding garbage like used food containers and such. She just refuses to throw away old gadgets, clothing, toys, receipts, magazines, and such.

But, her new place is just a big as her old place, and she is already staring to form aisles of boxes in her kitchen, dining room, and living room. Clutter like that drives me insane.
 
2014-06-11 01:22:37 PM  
I am so afraid my sister will end up like this...I can see the signs now, though you can still walk through her house and actually sit on furniture (well, some of it).  But the potential is there, gets worse every time I visit.  Any suggestions on early intervention (if it's at all possible?)
 
2014-06-11 01:50:16 PM  

Missicat: I am so afraid my sister will end up like this...I can see the signs now, though you can still walk through her house and actually sit on furniture (well, some of it).  But the potential is there, gets worse every time I visit.  Any suggestions on early intervention (if it's at all possible?)


Guylian posted this link above. I'd look at the resources tab for more specific things. I actually recognize a man in a YouTube link from the Hoarder TV show, I think 2nd year.

http://childrenofhoarders.com/wordpress/

I found this and seems really solid practical advice for a person with a low level problem.
http://offbeathome.com/2013/04/5-ways-to-cope-with-hoarding

I recognized my "twitchiness" by watching the hoarding TV shows. I found the 1st year of Hoarding: Buried Alive most helpful in terms of showing the effort and the decision making skills most needed. If your sister has other issues along side the hoarding (social anxiety, OCD, depression, mental deficiency, etc.) she may need therapeutic help. There are mental health professionals that specialize in hoarding who make house calls, as well as professional organizers who also make house calls.
 
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