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(The Verge)   Honeywell Samsungs Google's Nest thermostat   (theverge.com) divider line 71
    More: Interesting  
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4179 clicks; posted to Business » on 10 Jun 2014 at 11:57 PM (49 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



71 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-06-10 04:21:00 PM  
Apple should sue Honeywell for the use of a designer named Wozniak.
 
2014-06-10 05:07:20 PM  
i love my nest. there, i said it.
 
2014-06-10 08:22:18 PM  

FlashHarry: i love my nest. there, i said it.


Have you started getting advertisements on it?
 
2014-06-11 12:06:37 AM  
I've had a programmable thermostat for decades.
 
2014-06-11 12:11:39 AM  
On the plus side, the copying isn't as blatant as Samsung's.
 
2014-06-11 12:31:47 AM  

Russ1642: I've had a programmable thermostat for decades.


could you control it from your rotary phone?
 
2014-06-11 12:51:03 AM  

Russ1642: I've had a programmable thermostat for decades.


Me too. Mine doesn't work though.

"Honey, turn that goddamn thermostat back down to 70!"

"No, I'm cold!"
 
2014-06-11 01:00:27 AM  
This doesn't make sense - Honeywell shouldn't be forced to acknowledge changes in the market and ship products that people actually want to buy.

/this is what I learned from Fark's comment threads on Uber
 
2014-06-11 01:03:57 AM  
Honeywell installed Gentoo.
 
2014-06-11 01:09:32 AM  
I wonder if it will be cloud managed only and/or register its own internally generated heat thus running the AC too much in the summer and the heat too little in the winter like the Nest 2
 
2014-06-11 01:39:42 AM  

pedrop357: I wonder if it will be cloud managed only and/or register its own internally generated heat thus running the AC too much in the summer and the heat too little in the winter like the Nest 2


Nest is a software company first.  Honeywell is a systems control company first.  It's not going to make n00b mistakes like Nest.

/still not paying to make my apt. hackable.
 
2014-06-11 02:27:28 AM  

bdub77: Russ1642: I've had a programmable thermostat for decades.

Me too. Mine doesn't work though.

"Honey, turn that goddamn thermostat back down to 70!"

"No, I'm cold!"


70?! holy crap. I hope you live somewhere warmish. I can barely afford keeping my house at 68 for our 8 month long winters!  When I was on propane my heating bill was 700 / month to heat 1200 sq feet for 5 months straight!
 
2014-06-11 02:33:55 AM  
Honeywell actually invented the round thermostat -- one of them is in the Smithsonian (as a museum piece not as a working thermostat) and this is certainly not their first wifi thermostat.

I would say that Nest was inspired to make a round thermostat to bring us back to the simplicity of the classic Honeywell round thermostat.

i.imgur.com
Nevertheless, rest assured this turd will be ruined by Honeywell Brain Damage
 
2014-06-11 02:49:37 AM  
I, too, love my nest.

/no it doesn't have ads.
 
2014-06-11 04:45:59 AM  
The comments on theverge are cracking me up. There is no limit to how stupid fanbois can be when it comes to defending their favorite tech company. Really makes me wonder if religion went away, if it would simply be replaced with corporate worship. Seems like we're already half way there.
 
2014-06-11 06:02:29 AM  

SumoJeb: bdub77: Russ1642: I've had a programmable thermostat for decades.

Me too. Mine doesn't work though.

"Honey, turn that goddamn thermostat back down to 70!"

"No, I'm cold!"

70?! holy crap. I hope you live somewhere warmish. I can barely afford keeping my house at 68 for our 8 month long winters!  When I was on propane my heating bill was 700 / month to heat 1200 sq feet for 5 months straight!


i.imgur.com
 
2014-06-11 06:34:43 AM  
I've got older versions of the Honeywell wifi thermostats. They can be managed by a cell phone app which talks to the thermostat through a Honeywell Internet portal. That being said, besides corporate greed, what's stopping them from offering these features on the older wifi models too? I imagine all the geofencing and learning is being processed by the phone, not the thermostat hardware. It seems like the app and the Internet portal is the important part of the equation, and the thermostat itself is just the receiver and actuator.
 
2014-06-11 07:19:10 AM  
The Lyric is a surprisingly attractive piece of hardware.  I mean, it's still a thermostat and would probably serve as nothing more than wall art once the novelty wore off, but nonetheless, very nice design.
 
2014-06-11 07:53:30 AM  
The worst thing is that this headline actually makes sense.

/invisible liter +1, subby
 
2014-06-11 08:04:43 AM  
THIS AN A POUTRAGE!
 
2014-06-11 08:33:16 AM  

EngineerAU: The comments on theverge are cracking me up. There is no limit to how stupid fanbois can be when it comes to defending their favorite tech company. Really makes me wonder if religion went away, if it would simply be replaced with corporate worship. Seems like we're already half way there.


Tribalism will never go away. It's one of the most core aspects of human nature. I reckon... with my GED in psychology.
 
2014-06-11 08:38:41 AM  

Bob The Nob: SumoJeb: bdub77: Russ1642: I've had a programmable thermostat for decades.

Me too. Mine doesn't work though.

"Honey, turn that goddamn thermostat back down to 70!"

"No, I'm cold!"

70?! holy crap. I hope you live somewhere warmish. I can barely afford keeping my house at 68 for our 8 month long winters!  When I was on propane my heating bill was 700 / month to heat 1200 sq feet for 5 months straight!

[i.imgur.com image 300x295]


It's 6 feet of bubblegum. For you... not them.
 
2014-06-11 08:46:16 AM  
I have a wifi thermostat, can't remember the brand because I have a job and a family and friends.  It does everything this one is supposed to and only cost $100 or so.  And I have had it for 5 years, so where is the innovation?
 
2014-06-11 08:49:14 AM  

FlashHarry: i love my nest. there, i said it.


Does it have that handy feature where if you wave at it, it turns if off, like their smoke alarms?

http://www.cnbc.com/id/101694704
 
2014-06-11 09:03:59 AM  
I carry my thermostat from room to room with me. It`s battery powered and uses radio to talk to the boiler.

Most of the time I don`t think about it, the temperature stays just right wherever I am.

If I`m warm or want a breeze I`ll open a window.

Don`t see the fuss in having everything connected to the internet so shadowy forces can monitor my thermostat...
 
2014-06-11 09:25:25 AM  
Maybe this will finally get nest to show the weather forecast on their thermostat.
 
2014-06-11 09:35:56 AM  
Their marketing campaign should feature the passengers from Wall-e programming their thermostats without having to leave their fat-couches.
 
2014-06-11 09:39:07 AM  
I don't get the fascination with immediate online management of the thermostat. I  set mine up with a weekday and weekend program, and told everybody in the house not to mess with it. I don't ever have to think about it at all.
 
2014-06-11 09:43:09 AM  

RoyBatty: Honeywell actually invented the round thermostat -- one of them is in the Smithsonian (as a museum piece not as a working thermostat) and this is certainly not their first wifi thermostat.

I would say that Nest was inspired to make a round thermostat to bring us back to the simplicity of the classic Honeywell round thermostat.

[i.imgur.com image 702x337]
Nevertheless, rest assured this turd will be ruined by Honeywell Brain Damage


Wow, that's my exact thermostat. This place is farking old.
 
2014-06-11 09:45:26 AM  
I have a honeywell that was probably installed in the 50s. I set it at 65 in the wintertime and don't fark with it. In eth summertime I open the windows at night and close them during the day, a trick I learned from reading Love in the Time of Cholera. And when it gets really hot, I throw in a a window box AC.

If I get central air, I will get a non networked thermostat if possible, and if I have to choose a networked one, it will not be from google. I don't need to be in their carbon footprint database.
 
2014-06-11 09:46:09 AM  
I love my Nest. I never have to think about temp variations anymore.
 
2014-06-11 09:57:55 AM  
I'd pay good money for a thermostat that explains to my wife, "if the air conditioner isn't keeping up, turning the thermostat down won't help any."
 
2014-06-11 09:58:43 AM  
Stopped reading at "geofence". Farking Jargonauts.
 
2014-06-11 10:06:32 AM  
Huh, I expected the article to be how Honeywell Apple'd Nest.

Didn't Honeywell wipe out some smart thermostat company a while back with patents? Or was that Nest they went after?
 
2014-06-11 10:13:27 AM  

H31N0US: If I get central air, I will get a non networked thermostat if possible, and if I have to choose a networked one, it will not be from google. I don't need to be in their carbon footprint database.


That's adorable, thinking that a non-networked thermostat has you living off the grid.
 
2014-06-11 10:20:01 AM  
There's a part of this I don't understand.  If the thermostat doesn't kick on until you get within a few miles of home after work, then your home in the dead of winter is still at 58 degrees when you walk in, correct?  How is that innovation?
 
2014-06-11 10:20:09 AM  
I have two homes on my property and both have nest thermostats. In the beginning I wondered what new software upgrades would come to them and eagerly checked out the nest site for the info. But now I don't really care. They work seamlessly and I don't even think about them. We hardly ever have to alter the programming of them.

/love my nest
//don't need to have a weather station
 
2014-06-11 10:28:16 AM  
I don't understand the need for a networked thermostat.  As far as I can tell, a non-networked thermostat works 99.9% as good as a networked one.  I give the networked one a 0.1% advantage by gee-whiz factor only, and that's negated by the price and the increased failure points.

I installed a cheap-o programmable thermostat 10 years ago and it works just fine and I can make temporary changes on it as needed and it remembers what it's supposed to do.  Can someone enlighten me as to what these new networked ones do that's better?
 
2014-06-11 10:32:19 AM  

Explodo: I don't understand the need for a networked thermostat.  As far as I can tell, a non-networked thermostat works 99.9% as good as a networked one.  I give the networked one a 0.1% advantage by gee-whiz factor only, and that's negated by the price and the increased failure points.

I installed a cheap-o programmable thermostat 10 years ago and it works just fine and I can make temporary changes on it as needed and it remembers what it's supposed to do.  Can someone enlighten me as to what these new networked ones do that's better?


They don't do anything better. They are for obsessive-compulsive tech geeks.

The same kind of people that seriously consider remodeling their homes to hide speaker cables, basically.
 
hej
2014-06-11 10:33:04 AM  

Explodo: Can someone enlighten me as to what these new networked ones do that's better?


Being able to adjust the temperature remotely is handy when you're on another floor of the house and want to tweak the temperature, or if you don't happen to go to bed/work and come home at the same time for any given day of the week (at least until we invent mind reading thermostats).  Also good for when you go on vacation, as I'm about to.
 
2014-06-11 10:38:19 AM  
Phew. It's circular. They're safe from Apple's legal team.
 
2014-06-11 10:39:09 AM  

hej: Explodo: Can someone enlighten me as to what these new networked ones do that's better?

Being able to adjust the temperature remotely is handy when you're on another floor of the house and want to tweak the temperature, or if you don't happen to go to bed/work and come home at the same time for any given day of the week (at least until we invent mind reading thermostats).  Also good for when you go on vacation, as I'm about to.


So no extra benefit.  Got it.
 
2014-06-11 10:41:50 AM  
I too love my Nest.  No ads. Had it 3 years now.  I like the energy monthly energy use summary too.

I don't need/want the weather forecast on my thermostat. I have that on my phone.
 
hej
2014-06-11 10:53:45 AM  

Explodo: hej: Explodo: Can someone enlighten me as to what these new networked ones do that's better?

Being able to adjust the temperature remotely is handy when you're on another floor of the house and want to tweak the temperature, or if you don't happen to go to bed/work and come home at the same time for any given day of the week (at least until we invent mind reading thermostats).  Also good for when you go on vacation, as I'm about to.

So no extra benefit.  Got it.


Sure, if you ignore the ones I just named for you.
 
2014-06-11 11:01:29 AM  

hej: Explodo: hej: Explodo: Can someone enlighten me as to what these new networked ones do that's better?

Being able to adjust the temperature remotely is handy when you're on another floor of the house and want to tweak the temperature, or if you don't happen to go to bed/work and come home at the same time for any given day of the week (at least until we invent mind reading thermostats).  Also good for when you go on vacation, as I'm about to.

So no extra benefit.  Got it.

Sure, if you ignore the ones I just named for you.


Let's list them:

1)  You're too farking lazy to walk to the central location of your home where your thermostat is located (no benefit except to possibly the handicapped)
2)  Your home probably isn't that far off when you get home.  You'll have to suffer a few minutes of adjustment (oh noes!)
3)  Change it before you leave
 
hej
2014-06-11 11:06:38 AM  

Explodo: hej: Explodo: hej: Explodo: Can someone enlighten me as to what these new networked ones do that's better?

Being able to adjust the temperature remotely is handy when you're on another floor of the house and want to tweak the temperature, or if you don't happen to go to bed/work and come home at the same time for any given day of the week (at least until we invent mind reading thermostats).  Also good for when you go on vacation, as I'm about to.

So no extra benefit.  Got it.

Sure, if you ignore the ones I just named for you.

Let's list them:

1)  You're too farking lazy to walk to the central location of your home where your thermostat is located (no benefit except to possibly the handicapped)

My bedroom is on the second floor of the house.  If I'm in bed, I'd rather not get up to change the temperature.

2)  Your home probably isn't that far off when you get home.  You'll have to suffer a few minutes of adjustment (oh noes!)
Or I could just not "suffer" at all, and still not waste energy when I'm not home.

3)  Change it before you leave
It's conceivable I might forget.  Even if I don't, the thermostat doesn't know when I'm coming back.  See point #2.


Just because they're benefits you don't care about, doesn't mean they're not benefits.
 
2014-06-11 11:13:35 AM  

SumoJeb: bdub77: Russ1642: I've had a programmable thermostat for decades.

Me too. Mine doesn't work though.

"Honey, turn that goddamn thermostat back down to 70!"

"No, I'm cold!"

70?! holy crap. I hope you live somewhere warmish. I can barely afford keeping my house at 68 for our 8 month long winters!  When I was on propane my heating bill was 700 / month to heat 1200 sq feet for 5 months straight!


Considering propane is the single most expensive fuel you can use for home heating, your argument has limited value.
 
2014-06-11 11:18:10 AM  
i.imgur.com

/owns a Nest
 
2014-06-11 11:49:26 AM  

hej: in bed


For use in bed, I like my wifi / app based thermostat LESS than my older radio RF thermostat, which has a remote control than can be used in the dark, with no screen being lit, or having to fumble to figure out which end of the phone is up. Just find the remote, and hit the up button, turn the pillow over and drop back in to a better world.

But I do like my wifi thermostat far more than the RF thermostat for my ability to control it from my phones, tablets, desktop and work computer. And that I can change the schedule with a web browser and not having to remember a dozen fiddly little screens.

And that it lets me travel, let the temperature soar to 115 and then on the last day of travel, let's me bring the temps down again. And same thing but less dramatic just going to work and home.
 
2014-06-11 11:59:13 AM  

RoyBatty: hej: in bed

For use in bed, I like my wifi / app based thermostat LESS than my older radio RF thermostat, which has a remote control than can be used in the dark, with no screen being lit, or having to fumble to figure out which end of the phone is up. Just find the remote, and hit the up button, turn the pillow over and drop back in to a better world.

But I do like my wifi thermostat far more than the RF thermostat for my ability to control it from my phones, tablets, desktop and work computer. And that I can change the schedule with a web browser and not having to remember a dozen fiddly little screens.

And that it lets me travel, let the temperature soar to 115 and then on the last day of travel, let's me bring the temps down again. And same thing but less dramatic just going to work and home.


Hopefully, you're exaggerating.  Letting your house get over 90 inside is bad for the wood and everything else inside.

I set my manual thermostat to something between 80 and 85 in the summer when going away for more than a few days and 55 in the winter.

A programmable one would let me bring the house down in increments on the last day.
 
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