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(Daily Mail)   Half a million Brits face ruined vacations due to huge passport backlog. Americans ask, "What's a passport?"   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 256
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5927 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Jun 2014 at 10:04 AM (24 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-06-09 02:13:09 PM  

fireclown: dittybopper: I also forgot to point out:  Until relatively recently, a US citizen didn't need a passport to travel to Canada.  Now, you do, or an "Enhanced Driver's License".

IIRC, the need for a passport to get to Canada is a post 911 thing. 

What the heck is an Enhanced Drivers License? Is that some kind of state department issued DL that you can get if you live in a border state so that you don't have to carry a passport around all the time?  I figure it gets to be a pain if you lived in, say Buffalo.


Or, say, southern Ontario.  ;)  We had tickets to go to a Buffalo Bisons (Toronto Blue Jays farm team) a couple of weeks ago.  Passports required!  My dumb brother got up that morning and realized his was expired.  So no game for him.  We go to Buffalo for hockey and baseball (and occasionally football) games all the time - it's cheaper, easier to get tickets, and generally a shorter drive, definitely less traffic as long as the border is smooth.  It seems funny that most of us have a passport so we can go to hockey games.

The enhanced DL is a drivers license with more security features - but it's no good for flying.  So you may as well just have the full document.
 
2014-06-09 02:16:42 PM  

Mr. Eugenides: Rixel: thamike: Rixel: Huh? I think that statement is dubious at best.  Ever been to Canada?

It's about the same size, but the population is short by about 280 million.  I'd say the size is negligible (we're talking maybe 100,000 sq miles), because of the serious population discrepancy. Considering the sheer numbers, I'd say it's safe to bet, purely on statistics, that the U.S. is more ethnically and racially diverse than Canada.

Not sure of the veracity, though it is from Harvard:

[img.washingtonpost.com image 850x418]

That's an interesting graph.  Got a link to the original article?  I'd like to see the methodology for measuring diversity.


Don't quite have access to the original, but I picked up the chart from this article:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/worldviews/wp/2013/05/16/a-revea li ng-map-of-the-worlds-most-and-least-ethnically-diverse-countries/
 
2014-06-09 02:17:35 PM  

Firethorn: When I say 'touring Europe', I mean it.  We hit up a lot of the castles, but that's because I like castles.  We deliberately went for small bread&breakfast places, ate at local restaurants, etc...

Though I'll admit that sometimes food can be touchy and you want a taste of home.


We tried to get as much local flavor as we could, but with two small children it was hard to avoid the  "golden arches" entirely over there while we were out and about (especially if we were hours from home).  Which sucked because it was three times more expensive and their burgers tasted terrible.

We were lucky one night and got our landlord to babysit for use so we could go the local fancy restaurant.  It was wonderful but definitely not something that the kids would want to eat.  Luckily the village had a bakery and pizza place, so we had enough to keep them satisfied for our time over there without having to resort to "american" food.

We did drag them to castles (Carcassonne was amazing) and the Gorges Du Verdon (European version of the Grand Canyon), as well as some Mediterranean beaches and beautiful mountain vistas.  There was only one weekend we did go someplace (because it was pouring rain the entire weekend) in the entire 3 month stay.
 
2014-06-09 02:17:50 PM  

Rixel: Mr. Eugenides: Rixel: thamike: Rixel: Huh? I think that statement is dubious at best.  Ever been to Canada?

It's about the same size, but the population is short by about 280 million.  I'd say the size is negligible (we're talking maybe 100,000 sq miles), because of the serious population discrepancy. Considering the sheer numbers, I'd say it's safe to bet, purely on statistics, that the U.S. is more ethnically and racially diverse than Canada.

Not sure of the veracity, though it is from Harvard:

[img.washingtonpost.com image 850x418]

That's an interesting graph.  Got a link to the original article?  I'd like to see the methodology for measuring diversity.

Don't quite have access to the original, but I picked up the chart from this article:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/worldviews/wp/2013/05/16/a-revea li ng-map-of-the-worlds-most-and-least-ethnically-diverse-countries/


My, bad.  Original is located here:

http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=319762
 
2014-06-09 02:18:53 PM  

Fano: I've always thought it was unfair to blast Americans for not traveling across the Atlantic or Pacific routinely, and not needing to learn more than English! Since in reality you rarely run into foreign speakers.


Really?  Where do you live?

I'm in Atlanta, and Spanish and Korean are spoken everywhere around me.  On my floor at work---I work for a university---there are two Turks, four Chinese, one Croatian, three Russians, three French, one Dane, and maybe a few others I've forgotten (I don't interact with everyone on my floor).  While one can get by just knowing English, it's certainly not the only language spoken in the U S of A.
 
2014-06-09 02:19:29 PM  

Burr: There was only one weekend we did NOT go someplace (because it was pouring rain the entire weekend) in the entire 3 month stay.


FTFM
 
2014-06-09 02:21:00 PM  
One could spend a lifetime of vacationing and not see all America has to offer. I've been to all of the contiguous 48 States and still haven't seen all I want to. America is so vast and wonderful I don't feel the need to vist anywhere else.
 
2014-06-09 02:24:17 PM  
I'm only up to 25 stamps in my current passport. I'm hoping to get a few more in the coming year. For now I have: Canada, Honduras, Ecuador, BVI, Haiti, Bahamas, Mexico, Iceland, Greenland, Faeroe Islands, Sweden, Norway, Germany, Denmark, UK, Ireland, Tahiti, Micronesia, Morocco, Italy, Greece, Portugal/Azores, Spain, Dubai, and a few others. It's sometimes hard to get people to even stamp the passport these days too,
 
2014-06-09 02:27:57 PM  
 
2014-06-09 02:29:50 PM  
I've always thought Locked Up Abroad was a better travel brochure than the Travel Channel.
 
2014-06-09 02:29:59 PM  

Land_of_the_Magic_Dragon: spawn73: thamike: Rixel: Huh? I think that statement is dubious at best.  Ever been to Canada?

It's about the same size, but the population is short by about 280 million.  I'd say the size is negligible (we're talking maybe 100,000 sq miles), because of the serious population discrepancy. Considering the sheer numbers, I'd say it's safe to bet, purely on statistics, that the U.S. is more ethnically and racially diverse than Canada.

Belgium is more racially and ethnically diverse than USA. I consider Canada to be so as well by virtue of Quebec.

How did you reach that conclusion about Belgium and the USA? How does having a French speaking minority make Canada diverse?


By traveling across both countries.

The French speaking are Romanic, the English speaking Germanic. Different cultures.
 
2014-06-09 02:32:30 PM  

uttertosh: spawn73: uttertosh: spawn73: Some countries don't have ID cards, eg. Denmark, so Danes needs to bring their passport regardless.

not true. Their driving licence is sufficient.

/Swede who crosses the bridge to work and only takes his ATM card with him, never had a problem.

Hmm yes indeed. That's a consequence of the Scandinavian passport union though.

hmph... okay, you're correct about me crossing the bridge, but my standard ID card takes me to everywhere else (UK excluded), and I'm sure that the Danish driver licence allows Danes to do the same. The passports I hold I've only used to get into (and out of) the UK. The funny thing is that often when arriving back from the UK, I grab my bag and walk out without showing ID to anyone.


http://www.eu-oplysningen.dk/euo_en/spsv/all/83/

There's a guide here for the Schengen area, and it specifically says that if you're from a country without a national ID card, then you need a passport, ie. Denmark.

It also explains the Scandinavian passport union, and its consequences.


I don't really know what your standard ID card is. All I can say is that not all countries have national ID cards.
 
2014-06-09 02:38:40 PM  

spawn73: Land_of_the_Magic_Dragon: spawn73: thamike: Rixel: Huh? I think that statement is dubious at best.  Ever been to Canada?

It's about the same size, but the population is short by about 280 million.  I'd say the size is negligible (we're talking maybe 100,000 sq miles), because of the serious population discrepancy. Considering the sheer numbers, I'd say it's safe to bet, purely on statistics, that the U.S. is more ethnically and racially diverse than Canada.

Belgium is more racially and ethnically diverse than USA. I consider Canada to be so as well by virtue of Quebec.

How did you reach that conclusion about Belgium and the USA? How does having a French speaking minority make Canada diverse?

By traveling across both countries.

The French speaking are Romanic, the English speaking Germanic. Different cultures.


Not really. Sharing a common language doesn't make us a the same. Yankee in New England is nothing like a someone in the heart of Texas. English may be are main language but it doesn't mean we are all the same. You need to travel more if you think all Americans are the same.
 
2014-06-09 02:39:59 PM  

BorgiaGinz: Sure, you can experience Asian cuisines in the various Koreatowns, Chinatowns, Little Indias and so forth in major American cities. but nothing here can replace walking on the Great Wall of China (a lot steeper than you might think) or seeing the grandeur of the Forbidden City or the Taj Mahal for yourself.


I was concentrating on culture at the time, but you are correct with this.

It's just that when you need to add a zero to the price of a travel package to get there you need to pick and choose.

For the price of visiting ONE of the world wonders you mention I could visit 3-5 stateside ones.  Heck, traveling by camper is popular here, and you can do that without visiting the same area twice or leaving the states for years.
 
2014-06-09 02:44:52 PM  

FizixJunkee: Fano: I've always thought it was unfair to blast Americans for not traveling across the Atlantic or Pacific routinely, and not needing to learn more than English! Since in reality you rarely run into foreign speakers.

Really?  Where do you live?

I'm in Atlanta, and Spanish and Korean are spoken everywhere around me.  On my floor at work---I work for a university---there are two Turks, four Chinese, one Croatian, three Russians, three French, one Dane, and maybe a few others I've forgotten (I don't interact with everyone on my floor).  While one can get by just knowing English, it's certainly not the only language spoken in the U S of A.


DC and yes, let me amend my comment to mean monolingual nonenglish speakers. It is rarely necessary to NEED to switch to that language. I also hear plenty of tourists walking around speaking lots of different languages to their friends and family. Unless you are about to make up a story about how useful it would be to speak Croatian or Danish in the US.
 
2014-06-09 03:12:53 PM  
The US is super diverse. shiat I was born in south Louisiana to a French/Sicilian mother and a Jewish/Colombian father. And that was in 1969 when things were less diverse. New Orleans is very culturally diverse as is San Francisco and new York. I guess most of you canucks have been to Wisconsin. I find most Canadians to be super white bread.

I am colombia right now enjoying the Andes and my inlaws.

400$ round trip from Orlando four hour flight

300$ for a furnished apartment for ten days

1000$ spending cash

200$ for fancy hipster hotel in Bogota for some me time

2000$ for 12 days and that included a side trip to Medellin to get liquored up.
 
2014-06-09 03:28:34 PM  

fireclown:  I can drive a car from the North of Canada to Buenos Aires and only run into Two languages.  (If I miss Brazil an that weird part of Canada).


ᐋᒃᑲ.

LineNoise:

Yea, the passport needed for the carribean\mexico\canada thing is post 9/11. The US got all tough on people coming in without passports, so those countries in turn said, "fine, if you are making our people buy passports, we are doing the same to you"

Not exactly.  The US passport is only required to re-enter the US.  The only reason Canadian border guards check your passport is so that you don't get stuck in Canada.  We didn't choose to go to this tighter security situation.

This text is now purple: Canada is larger, but less diverse. Russia is bigger and arguably has comparable diversity, but no one lives where most of the scenic occurs.


You clearly haven't seen much of either country.

thefonz37: I don't think US citizens are necessarily limited by the desire to travel and see other cultures so much as they are by simple geography and economics.  I feel fortunate to have been to Italy once as well as Australia, and I'd love to see a lot of other places around the world, but mostly when it comes to vacation planning, a trip to a New Jersey beach or a Kentucky distillery is an order of magnitude less expensive than flying across an ocean.


It boggles my mind how Americans can completely dismiss Mexico, which is all attached and all to the US.

thamike:I'd say it's safe to bet, purely on statistics, that the U.S. is more ethnically and racially diverse than Canada.

And yet you'd lose that bet.  Fully 7% more of Canada's population is immigrant compared to the US.   We have the highest immigrant population of any country in the G8.  And there is no negligible difference between the portion of that that is of western origin.

Jument: Canada's population and cities are more diverse than the US, without question. However, I would agree that the US has greater regional differences from place to place than Canada. So in a way you could say that it is more diverse while being less diverse, if you know what I mean. :)


Yeah, with that statement I'm pretty sure you haven't seen much of Canada.
 
2014-06-09 03:49:36 PM  
Wait till you go to the airport and the only form of identification you have is a passport and the officer on duty tells you that is not a government issued ID, and that he can't let you board without a valid government issued ID,  Then you tell him, it is a passport issued by the US Department of State.  He responds,
" Sir you'll need to stand over there."  While he puts on his latex gloves...
 
2014-06-09 03:52:10 PM  

pjbreeze: Wait till you go to the airport and the only form of identification you have is a passport and the officer on duty tells you that is not a government issued ID, and that he can't let you board without a valid government issued ID,  Then you tell him, it is a passport issued by the US Department of State.  He responds,
" Sir you'll need to stand over there."  While he puts on his latex gloves...


I've never had that happen.  ESPECIALLY not at an airport.  Heck, I used to use my passport at bars (just to be a jerk) and never had any trouble.
 
2014-06-09 03:53:45 PM  

spawn73: Belgium is more racially and ethnically diverse than USA. I consider Canada to be so as well by virtue of Quebec.


So the Acadian-speakers in southern Louisiana don't count because why?
 
2014-06-09 03:54:58 PM  

fireclown: pjbreeze: Wait till you go to the airport and the only form of identification you have is a passport and the officer on duty tells you that is not a government issued ID, and that he can't let you board without a valid government issued ID,  Then you tell him, it is a passport issued by the US Department of State.  He responds,
" Sir you'll need to stand over there."  While he puts on his latex gloves...

I've never had that happen.  ESPECIALLY not at an airport.  Heck, I used to use my passport at bars (just to be a jerk) and never had any trouble.


In college, I watched students try using their passport and being laughed out of the bar. I think location has a lot to do with it.
 
2014-06-09 04:00:05 PM  

spawn73: http://www.eu-oplysningen.dk/euo_en/spsv/all/83/

There's a guide here for the Schengen area, and it specifically says that if you're from a country without a national ID card, then you need a passport, ie. Denmark.

It also explains the Scandinavian passport union, and its consequences.


I don't really know what your standard ID card is. All I can say is that not all countries have national ID cards.


Okay, thanks for that. I simply assumed that driver license confirmed national identity and was valid as a form of ID, as it holds photo, DOB, signature, and social securities detail.

Glad of the correction! :-)
 
2014-06-09 04:06:04 PM  

spawn73: I don't really know what your standard ID card is. All I can say is that not all countries have national ID cards.


It's the tax office's ID, simply stating name, DOB, Height, Signatire, SS number.

Oh, it's not compulsary by any means, but to have a card that is 99% as good as passport ID, but doesn't fark you in the ass to get replaced (400Kr, same-day), that's worth vounteering for!
 
2014-06-09 04:14:34 PM  

uttertosh: spawn73: http://www.eu-oplysningen.dk/euo_en/spsv/all/83/

There's a guide here for the Schengen area, and it specifically says that if you're from a country without a national ID card, then you need a passport, ie. Denmark.

It also explains the Scandinavian passport union, and its consequences.


I don't really know what your standard ID card is. All I can say is that not all countries have national ID cards.

Okay, thanks for that. I simply assumed that driver license confirmed national identity and was valid as a form of ID, as it holds photo, DOB, signature, and social securities detail.

Glad of the correction! :-)


I guess the problem with a drivers license is that it only conveys which country it was issued in, and that you're allowed to drive a car there. But it doesn't divulge your nationality.

In the real world it would probably work fine though, as long as you don't look like a Roma or North African.
 
2014-06-09 04:18:45 PM  

This text is now purple: spawn73: Belgium is more racially and ethnically diverse than USA. I consider Canada to be so as well by virtue of Quebec.

So the Acadian-speakers in southern Louisiana don't count because why?

 Well, there's a difference between going to China Town, or going to a part of a country that has a different culture and language top-down.
I'm not sure how the Acadian-speaking areas work. Whether they just constitute a minority, or a real "country within a country". I haven't been there, and aren't familiar with them.But I'd be surprised if you couldn't find the same products in the supermarket, have people understand English etc.
 
2014-06-09 04:21:17 PM  

uttertosh: spawn73: I don't really know what your standard ID card is. All I can say is that not all countries have national ID cards.

It's the tax office's ID, simply stating name, DOB, Height, Signatire, SS number.

Oh, it's not compulsary by any means, but to have a card that is 99% as good as passport ID, but doesn't fark you in the ass to get replaced (400Kr, same-day), that's worth vounteering for!


All Danes have a SS card.

But for some reason it just has your name, address and SS number. Ie., nothing to actually identify you as the actual owner of the card.

I'm sure there's good reasons for not including a picture and signature, but I can't really think of any now.
 
2014-06-09 04:26:57 PM  

Ant: Tigger: I think most people would suggest that the benefits of travel are more in the 'experiencing diversity of culture' side of things than 'change of weather'.

Different regions of the US have different cultural practices. Go to Atlanta and then to Seattle, and tell me those aren't two different cultures.


Or try Bar Harbor, Maine and then New Orleans, LA. followed by a side of Taos, NM and then the Amish Country around Lancaster, PA. and finally Honolulu, HI and then Juneau, AK. There is amazing diversity here both culturally and geographically.

Nothing beats a nice Euro vacation for something uniquely different, but it's completely possible to stay in the States and have a fascinating time exploring around.
 
2014-06-09 04:38:32 PM  

Disaster Transport: Disaster Transport: fireclown: dittybopper: I also forgot to point out:  Until relatively recently, a US citizen didn't need a passport to travel to Canada.  Now, you do, or an "Enhanced Driver's License".

IIRC, the need for a passport to get to Canada is a post 911 thing. 

What the heck is an Enhanced Drivers License? Is that some kind of state department issued DL that you can get if you live in a border state so that you don't have to carry a passport around all the time?  I figure it gets to be a pain if you lived in, say Buffalo.

I'm guessing he's lives in a boarder state that offers them, like Michigan. I bought a "Passport Card", which has the size/look of a driver's license, costs much less than a passport, and can be used only for land travel between the US and Canada or Mexico (and apparently the Caribbean, so maybe that's for cruises?). I bought one when I applied for my passport because you never know when you want to go gambling in Windsor. I thought if anything, it would be a nice back-up form of identification should I lose my driver's license.

Border. Sorry need coffee...


No one should get hassled on Fark for anything they say between 7 AM and 11 AM for this very reason. Also between 2 AM and 5 AM because we are all 3 sheets to the wind.
 
2014-06-09 04:40:32 PM  

Teknowaffle: CheapEngineer:
\I'm not flying *anywhere* while the TSA is f*cking up air travel

Travelling via air is fine and efficient. 9-11 was 13 years ago, and security is not the hassle it is made out to be at just about any airport anymore. The TSA has done a couple of stupid things, but things have gotten smooth, and efficient for the most part in the security checkpoints.

Hell, the biggest issue with security these days is the morons in the travelling public who take 15 minutes to get their shiat through the scanner, and then walk through with various metal items all over their body.


Glad to hear it's improved.

Don't make up bullshiat excuses. Just admit you are too poor or are scared to fly.

And you wasted all that logical, informative response with this pile of shiat.

Go fark Yourself.
 
2014-06-09 04:43:34 PM  

wingnut396: Tigger: Ant: Tigger: I think most people would suggest that the benefits of travel are more in the 'experiencing diversity of culture' side of things than 'change of weather'.

Different regions of the US have different cultural practices. Go to Atlanta and then to Seattle, and tell me those aren't two different cultures.

No one is disagreeing with that.

I was disagreeing with the ridiculous notion that the variance of culture within the US is the same as between the US and the rest of the world which is laughably untrue.

I think the poster was saying that culture variation within the US is just as broad as the variation in Europe. I don't buy it.  The variation between Amsterdam and Milan are far greater than Houston and NYC for instance.


I don't think it's nearly as broad, but there are a lot of cultural variances. Hawaii and Alaska are really different from mainstream USA (mostly because they are foreign countries that we stole).

/USA!
 
2014-06-09 04:56:19 PM  

Tigger: wingnut396: Tigger: Ant: Tigger: I think most people would suggest that the benefits of travel are more in the 'experiencing diversity of culture' side of things than 'change of weather'.

Different regions of the US have different cultural practices. Go to Atlanta and then to Seattle, and tell me those aren't two different cultures.

No one is disagreeing with that.

I was disagreeing with the ridiculous notion that the variance of culture within the US is the same as between the US and the rest of the world which is laughably untrue.

I think the poster was saying that culture variation within the US is just as broad as the variation in Europe. I don't buy it.  The variation between Amsterdam and Milan are far greater than Houston and NYC for instance.

But the peculiar thing to me is how often I see that stated. I've never really understood what drives that. There's usually some sort of internal psychological value to being wrong for the individual who is wrong; however, in this case I don't know what it could be.


A lot of it is Americentrism. Pig ignorant folks who refuse to see anything of any value offered by different countries and cultures. Is it a real surprise that it's a thing here? I have a friend (believe me, it's slim pickings) at work who refuses to watch any foreign movie or listen to music from anywhere except US/UK. I told him he's missing out on a lot of fascinating stuff that could really expand his knowledge base and appreciation of the rest of the world, he's like "meh". We both are big science fiction/ science nerds so we get along because of that, he is just stubborn as shiat about even making an effort to experience anything not American. It's pretty infuriating.
 
2014-06-09 05:05:23 PM  

spawn73: All Danes have a SS card.


mine isn't an SS card, just an ID card you get from the tax office... now even I'm confused. What was the original question again? ;-)
 
2014-06-09 05:14:55 PM  

uttertosh: spawn73: All Danes have a SS card.

mine isn't an SS card, just an ID card you get from the tax office... now even I'm confused. What was the original question again? ;-)


Dunno. But thats why Danes have to carry passports, and you don't.
 
2014-06-09 05:15:40 PM  

spawn73: All Danes have a SS card.



I sailed aboard the SS  Card. Horrible ship, great trip. The buffet was lousy, and the toilets backed up.

But there were no Frenchmen nor Welsh, so I call it a win.
 
2014-06-09 05:21:16 PM  

HopScotchNSoda: I sailed aboard the SS Card. Horrible ship, great trip. The buffet was lousy, and the toilets backed up.

But there were no Frenchmen nor Welsh, so I call it a win.


worst limerick evar.
 
2014-06-09 05:53:46 PM  

thamike: CheapEngineer: \I'm not flying *anywhere* while the TSA is f*cking up air travel


A high speed rail project would fix your problem.


How? The TSA would be in charge of security for it, too. Just like Amtrak and Greyhound.
 
2014-06-09 06:02:57 PM  
People are the same all over. There is probably the same % of people in America and the UK that go to exotic places on holiday like The Maldives or Borneo. Most Brits tend to go to the Spanish beach resorts, islands and Florida in my experience.

There are just as many Brits going to all-inclusive resorts and eating buffets of British food as Americans going to six flags and the redneck riviera.

The only difference is Brits get 3 times as much paid holiday. But the kids only get a month off in the summer so EVERYONE goes at the same time.

People are people, no need for anyone to get defensive or feel superior. It's your holiday, do what you like.
 
2014-06-09 06:17:12 PM  

nekom: EvilEgg: The neat thing about America, is that you don't need to leave the country to find the climate of your choice for vacation.

They also speak the same language in all of that.  I've been to Canada and the Bahamas back when you didn't need a passport, so I've never had one though I probably will get one sooner or later.


The same language? Wha? o_O

Georgian accents =/= Boston accents =/= Midwestern accents

Also, Tennessean accents are more foreign and thick sounding than some Indian Tech Help hotlines I've been on.
 
2014-06-09 06:43:16 PM  

untaken_name: thamike: CheapEngineer: \I'm not flying *anywhere* while the TSA is f*cking up air travel


A high speed rail project would fix your problem.

How? The TSA would be in charge of security for it, too. Just like Amtrak and Greyhound.


I don't know where you live, but here in Chicago, and everywhere else where Amtrak has major stations / termini, Amtrak Police have told TSA, in no uncertain terms, to take a flying fark. TSA wanted to patrol yards and stations, but Amtrak Police have strictly and consistently forbidden them.
 
2014-06-09 07:04:41 PM  

Tigger: But if you want to believe there's as much cultural variation within the US as there is between the USA and, say, South East Asia then I can't really stop you. It's just a bit weird.


You realize that there are entire cities in the USA comprised entirely of individuals from South East Asia right?  Who cook the same food & speak the same language here as they did there?  Who live in communities comprised of other 1st & 2nd gen immigrants of the same origin?  Who practice the same religion and follow the same traditions as they did there?

There are plenty of reasons to leave the USA, "experience other cultures" is not one of them.
 
2014-06-09 07:06:57 PM  

spawn73: This text is now purple: spawn73: Belgium is more racially and ethnically diverse than USA. I consider Canada to be so as well by virtue of Quebec.

So the Acadian-speakers in southern Louisiana don't count because why?
 Well, there's a difference between going to China Town, or going to a part of a country that has a different culture and language top-down.
I'm not sure how the Acadian-speaking areas work. Whether they just constitute a minority, or a real "country within a country". I haven't been there, and aren't familiar with them.But I'd be surprised if you couldn't find the same products in the supermarket, have people understand English etc.


Belgium is a country of 11 million people. The US is a country of 300 million people. You are seriously deluded, friend. Here's a list of ethnic enclaves within the US: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_ethnic_enclaves_in_North_America n _cities

Oddly, there doesn't seem to be a list for Belgium.
 
2014-06-09 07:20:23 PM  

untaken_name: spawn73: This text is now purple: spawn73: Belgium is more racially and ethnically diverse than USA. I consider Canada to be so as well by virtue of Quebec.

So the Acadian-speakers in southern Louisiana don't count because why?
 Well, there's a difference between going to China Town, or going to a part of a country that has a different culture and language top-down.
I'm not sure how the Acadian-speaking areas work. Whether they just constitute a minority, or a real "country within a country". I haven't been there, and aren't familiar with them.But I'd be surprised if you couldn't find the same products in the supermarket, have people understand English etc.

Belgium is a country of 11 million people. The US is a country of 300 million people. You are seriously deluded, friend. Here's a list of ethnic enclaves within the US: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_ethnic_enclaves_in_North_America n _cities

Oddly, there doesn't seem to be a list for Belgium.


I don't know you really, but maybe you could be my friend.

Frankly, I don't think its odd that you don't have a clue. That fits well into my stereotype of Americans.

---

Ethnic enclaves in Belgium, there are none!

Please don't ever try to look things up before posting, I like you the way you are.
 
2014-06-09 07:22:57 PM  

HopScotchNSoda: untaken_name: thamike: CheapEngineer: \I'm not flying *anywhere* while the TSA is f*cking up air travel


A high speed rail project would fix your problem.

How? The TSA would be in charge of security for it, too. Just like Amtrak and Greyhound.

I don't know where you live, but here in Chicago, and everywhere else where Amtrak has major stations / termini, Amtrak Police have told TSA, in no uncertain terms, to take a flying fark. TSA wanted to patrol yards and stations, but Amtrak Police have strictly and consistently forbidden them.


http://www.dhs.gov/photo/amtrak-bag-check-tsa

http://www.dhs.gov/photo/k9-inspection-amtrak-tsa

http://www.dhs.gov/news/2010/07/01/secretary-napolitano-announces-ra il -security-enhancements-launches-expansion-see

Clearly, that doesn't apply everywhere. They are also doing patdowns, bag checks, and wand checks in Greyhound stations. I have experienced that personally. I almost got arrested for having an ecig that "doesn't look like a cigarette."
 
2014-06-09 07:45:26 PM  

untaken_name: Clearly, that doesn't apply everywhere. They are also doing patdowns, bag checks, and wand checks in Greyhound stations. I have experienced that personally. I almost got arrested for having an ecig that "doesn't look like a cigarette."



It takes time for the Amtrack PD to find and kick the TSA asshats off the property when they show up.
 
2014-06-09 07:53:40 PM  

Panatheist: vudukungfu: dittybopper: I also forgot to point out:  Until relatively recently, a US citizen didn't need a passport to travel to Canada.  Now, you do, or an "Enhanced Driver's License".

yeah, I used to spend a lot of money in Canada.
Now, fark them.
They allowed us to pull that post 9-11 bandwagon patriot bullcrap.
fark them


is Canada now supposed to be the U.S.'s EA (Empires Anonymous) sponsor?


America is drunk with power and needs a sponsor.
 
2014-06-09 08:34:39 PM  

untaken_name: HopScotchNSoda: untaken_name: thamike: CheapEngineer: \I'm not flying *anywhere* while the TSA is f*cking up air travel


A high speed rail project would fix your problem.

How? The TSA would be in charge of security for it, too. Just like Amtrak and Greyhound.

I don't know where you live, but here in Chicago, and everywhere else where Amtrak has major stations / termini, Amtrak Police have told TSA, in no uncertain terms, to take a flying fark. TSA wanted to patrol yards and stations, but Amtrak Police have strictly and consistently forbidden them.

http://www.dhs.gov/photo/amtrak-bag-check-tsa

http://www.dhs.gov/photo/k9-inspection-amtrak-tsa

http://www.dhs.gov/news/2010/07/01/secretary-napolitano-announces-ra il -security-enhancements-launches-expansion-see

Clearly, that doesn't apply everywhere. They are also doing patdowns, bag checks, and wand checks in Greyhound stations. I have experienced that personally. I almost got arrested for having an ecig that "doesn't look like a cigarette."



Yes, I had heard about TSA horning in on Amtrak out where Amtrak Police don't have a presence.

Major stations, though, forget it. Yards, forget it. Even non-Amtrak yards don't allow TSA, and do so (and not illegitimately) under the aegis of occupational health & safety. TSA plods are not trained and certified to keep themselves from getting seriously injured or killed in a rail yard. Meanwhile, the railroads have their own real police, who do know their way around a yard.

Take Union Station in Chicago. TSA announced their intention to patrol the station, tunnels, and yards. Amtrak refused, and made it clear that TSA employees would be arrested for trespass. Not only would they be in the way and a safety menace, but you can't swing a dead cat in Union Station without hitting an actual police officer - who does know rail safety, rail security, and law enforcement. Amtrak cops, Metra (our regional commuter rail agency) cops, BNSF Railroad cops, and railroad contract police, are all over the place and on many a train. The city police don't even bother.
 
2014-06-09 10:52:13 PM  

Rigby-Reardon: This text is now purple: Rigby-Reardon: I think some people feel it is part of national pride. Our country is bigger, we are just as diverse, our natural wonders are as good. Don't think they like to talk about Russia or Canada which are both bigger.

Canada is larger, but less diverse. Russia is bigger and arguably has comparable diversity, but no one lives where most of the scenic occurs.

The comparable nation no one really talks about is China.

You could argue that Canada is more diverse culturally with 2 national languages and a large area that speaks french almost exclusively.

No one lives where most of the scenic happens in the US either. Typically people moving in ruins the scenic.

It's all ridiculous anyhow. Get a passport and travel. In the US or outside it. Lots to see out there.


China gets a bad rep from the avg American but that country has some amazingly beautiful sceneries juse like it is in the states.
 
2014-06-10 12:38:49 AM  

dittybopper: I also forgot to point out:  Until relatively recently, a US citizen didn't need a passport to travel to Canada.  Now, you do, or an "Enhanced Driver's License".


I've been to Canada once, and to Mexico four times.  I didn't need a passport.  However, I'm sure the rules have changed since 9/11, and I haven't left the country since then.  On 9/11, my parents were in Canada, with no passport.  They have no trouble getting back into the US, but they had to drive their rental car back to Texas, because they had flown through New York and obviously, flying home again wasn't an option.

I do want to get a passport.  Not so much because I plan to travel, but once I had my wallet stolen, and it's a pain to get new ID when your ID just got stolen.  Having a passport would have made things easier.

People in Europe are used to countries smaller than our states.  They need a passport to go a couple-hundred miles from home. They just have no concept of a country where you can 8 hours and be in the same state. I live in Dallas.  It's 600 miles to El Paso, a 9 hour drive, and you're still in Texas.
 
2014-06-10 03:31:48 AM  

Tigger: EvilEgg: The neat thing about America, is that you don't need to leave the country to find the climate of your choice for vacation.

I think most people would suggest that the benefits of travel are more in the 'experiencing diversity of culture' side of things than 'change of weather'.


I'm not sure that's the case with Brits heading to sunny beaches.  They have to pay with Euro, but the locals and free enterprise seem to have created little tourist ghettos where Brits can eat fry-ups for breakfast, drink in pubs and carry on just as they would in London or Edinburgh except for the sunshine and heat.
 
2014-06-10 10:17:46 AM  

HopScotchNSoda: untaken_name: HopScotchNSoda: untaken_name: thamike: CheapEngineer: \I'm not flying *anywhere* while the TSA is f*cking up air travel


A high speed rail project would fix your problem.

How? The TSA would be in charge of security for it, too. Just like Amtrak and Greyhound.

I don't know where you live, but here in Chicago, and everywhere else where Amtrak has major stations / termini, Amtrak Police have told TSA, in no uncertain terms, to take a flying fark. TSA wanted to patrol yards and stations, but Amtrak Police have strictly and consistently forbidden them.

http://www.dhs.gov/photo/amtrak-bag-check-tsa

http://www.dhs.gov/photo/k9-inspection-amtrak-tsa

http://www.dhs.gov/news/2010/07/01/secretary-napolitano-announces-ra il -security-enhancements-launches-expansion-see

Clearly, that doesn't apply everywhere. They are also doing patdowns, bag checks, and wand checks in Greyhound stations. I have experienced that personally. I almost got arrested for having an ecig that "doesn't look like a cigarette."


Yes, I had heard about TSA horning in on Amtrak out where Amtrak Police don't have a presence.

Major stations, though, forget it. Yards, forget it. Even non-Amtrak yards don't allow TSA, and do so (and not illegitimately) under the aegis of occupational health & safety. TSA plods are not trained and certified to keep themselves from getting seriously injured or killed in a rail yard. Meanwhile, the railroads have their own real police, who do know their way around a yard.

Take Union Station in Chicago. TSA announced their intention to patrol the station, tunnels, and yards. Amtrak refused, and made it clear that TSA employees would be arrested for trespass. Not only would they be in the way and a safety menace, but you can't swing a dead cat in Union Station without hitting an actual police officer - who does know rail safety, rail security, and law enforcement. Amtrak cops, Metra (our regional commuter rail agency) cops, BNSF Railroad cops, and railroad co ...


I'm in NY and have never seen TSA loafing about a train station or bus terminal.  We've got real city police with automatic weapons and hearts of gold.
 
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