If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Daily Mail)   Half a million Brits face ruined vacations due to huge passport backlog. Americans ask, "What's a passport?"   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 256
    More: Fail  
•       •       •

5940 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Jun 2014 at 10:04 AM (28 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



256 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | » | Last | Show all
 
2014-06-09 11:05:08 AM  

Fano: Tigger: dittybopper: Tigger: The similarities culturally between Soiux Falls, SD, New York City and the Appalachians are far greater than the difference between any one of those places and anywhere in Europe or Asia.

I'm willing to bet that in your travels you stay in chain hotels, eat in chain restaurants, and work at corporation locations, so mostly, you don't get the local color.  You get the bland, averaged out experience.

And you would be totally and completely wrong.

But if you want to believe there's as much cultural variation within the US as there is between the USA and, say, South East Asia then I can't really stop you. It's just a bit weird.

but the difference between France and Monaco? Or Germany and Denmark?


This is like a group of white guys walking up to a group consisting of a black guy, two Asian guys, an Hispanic guy and a white guy and saying "Look, they have two Asians. That group is no more ethnically diverse than we are."
 
2014-06-09 11:05:35 AM  

akula: dittybopper: I also forgot to point out:  Until relatively recently, a US citizen didn't need a passport to travel to Canada.  Now, you do, or an "Enhanced Driver's License".

You used to be able to go to Mexico without a passport too. I did that when I was in high school. Different times then (heh, now that I think about it, it was 20 years ago this past spring... wow).

Most Americans just have little need for a passport. Going out of the country can be expensive, especially if you aren't going to Canada or Mexico. If you can get a nice beach in Florida or California and good skiing in Colorado, there's not always going to be much reason to go outside the country for travel. Sure, there's other cultures and other things to experience but that's not always a priority.


That's my reasoning. Going out of the country would be nice, but I make a slightly below average salary and get one week of vacation per year. How much quality "experiencing other cultures" time can I get with that? I really don't get how so many are able to do it unless they're wealthier retirees, spoiled college kids, or people who do it for work.
 
2014-06-09 11:05:42 AM  

This text is now purple: Rigby-Reardon: I think some people feel it is part of national pride. Our country is bigger, we are just as diverse, our natural wonders are as good. Don't think they like to talk about Russia or Canada which are both bigger.

Canada is larger, but less diverse. Russia is bigger and arguably has comparable diversity, but no one lives where most of the scenic occurs.

The comparable nation no one really talks about is China.


That what is good about the US and Europe, the scenic often occurs in populated areas.
 
2014-06-09 11:08:24 AM  

Rigby-Reardon: Don't think they like to talk about Russia or Canada which are both bigger.


Only if you count useless frozen space. Heck in the US we bomb the shiat out of or put casinos up in our deserts. And the desserts are good too.
 
2014-06-09 11:09:51 AM  
I'm currently waiting for my passport, so I'm getting a kick...

/vado in Roma nel'autunno per 3 mesi
 
2014-06-09 11:10:30 AM  

browntimmy: That's my reasoning. Going out of the country would be nice, but I make a slightly below average salary and get one week of vacation per year. How much quality "experiencing other cultures" time can I get with that? I really don't get how so many are able to do it unless they're wealthier retirees, spoiled college kids, or people who do it for work.


One week?  That's awful.  I get a little over 4 weeks, and if I stick around my employer for another decade or two, it maxes out at nearly 6 weeks.
 
2014-06-09 11:10:35 AM  

This text is now purple: Rigby-Reardon: I think some people feel it is part of national pride. Our country is bigger, we are just as diverse, our natural wonders are as good. Don't think they like to talk about Russia or Canada which are both bigger.

Canada is larger, but less diverse. Russia is bigger and arguably has comparable diversity, but no one lives where most of the scenic occurs.

The comparable nation no one really talks about is China.


You could argue that Canada is more diverse culturally with 2 national languages and a large area that speaks french almost exclusively.

No one lives where most of the scenic happens in the US either. Typically people moving in ruins the scenic.

It's all ridiculous anyhow. Get a passport and travel. In the US or outside it. Lots to see out there.
 
2014-06-09 11:11:49 AM  
To clear things up:

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2014-06-09 11:12:36 AM  

mattberg: My uncle had some friends from France come to the states a number of years ago. The one lady was an English teacher, and taught her students about the states. They arrived in New York, and set off on a 3 week driving tour of the states. The teacher really wanted to see California, and could not understand why it was too far away to fit it into the trip. That is, until it was explained to her that driving to California would be like driving to central Turkey from her home. Then she understood how small and wimpy Europe is, and how large and kick ass the US is.


I was in Britain several years ago. I asked our guide how far it is from the tip of Cornwall up to the tip of Scotland. He said it was about 700 miles. I responded that sounds like a full day's drive and he seemed astonished that a person could actually drive 700 miles in a day. I guess they don't have an interstate highway system like ours. I mean, we drove on some nice, fast motorways there, but they must not go everywhere. It definitely seemed like we didn't have the same sense of scale. The same goes with history. He showed us things that were 200-300 years old and we were impressed, but he seemed unenthusiastic about that because he could walk down the street and appreciate an 1,800 year old Roman ruin.

He also didn't seem to grasp that, if he visited the US, he couldn't visit the East Coast cities and also take a few hours to buzz by Memphis, Tennessee to see Graceland. He was a big Elvis fan.

Another interesting tidbit from that trip: Our bus driver was a older Liverpudlian named John who claimed that he went to school with the Beatles, and that his father managed one of the clubs or pubs or whatever that the Beatles often played at in that time.

So, we have huge space while they have huge history. Both are advantages.
 
2014-06-09 11:13:53 AM  

This text is now purple: Rigby-Reardon: I think some people feel it is part of national pride. Our country is bigger, we are just as diverse, our natural wonders are as good. Don't think they like to talk about Russia or Canada which are both bigger.

Canada is larger, but less diverse. Russia is bigger and arguably has comparable diversity, but no one lives where most of the scenic occurs.

The comparable nation no one really talks about is China.


I've travelled across Canada everywhere except the far north (I'll get there!) and there is plenty of diversity but I do have to agree on the emptiness. You get outside the major cities and civilization starts to rapidly thin out and after an hour you will go long stretches without seeing another human being which is totally awesome. The plus side is that you can enjoy the scenery without the gaudy touristy crap but the downside is that sometimes you really want a sandwich and it will take you an hour or two to find one. It's ridiculous that we have such a huge amount of space and almost nobody living on it let alone serving sandwiches.
 
2014-06-09 11:13:59 AM  

fireclown: BunkyBrewman: That reminds me... how long does it take to get a passport nowadays?

I just got mine renewed, it took about two weeks.


Yes, getting a passport is rather straightforward. Getting a visa for some countries - especially the ones we've recently pissed off - can take much longer.
 
2014-06-09 11:14:11 AM  

Rigby-Reardon: This text is now purple: Rigby-Reardon: I think some people feel it is part of national pride. Our country is bigger, we are just as diverse, our natural wonders are as good. Don't think they like to talk about Russia or Canada which are both bigger.

Canada is larger, but less diverse. Russia is bigger and arguably has comparable diversity, but no one lives where most of the scenic occurs.

The comparable nation no one really talks about is China.

You could argue that Canada is more diverse culturally with 2 national languages and a large area that speaks french almost exclusively.

No one lives where most of the scenic happens in the US either. Typically people moving in ruins the scenic.

It's all ridiculous anyhow. Get a passport and travel. In the US or outside it. Lots to see out there.


But really, who gives a shiat about cultural diversity? No one travels to England to check out the paki diaspora.
 
2014-06-09 11:14:25 AM  

justanotherfarkinfarker: Rigby-Reardon: Don't think they like to talk about Russia or Canada which are both bigger.

Only if you count useless frozen space. Heck in the US we bomb the shiat out of or put casinos up in our deserts. And the desserts are good too.


Yet a large portion of the US population refers to 3/4 of the US as "flyover country".
 
2014-06-09 11:14:26 AM  

Tigger: EvilEgg: The neat thing about America, is that you don't need to leave the country to find the climate of your choice for vacation.

I think most people would suggest that the benefits of travel are more in the 'experiencing diversity of culture' side of things than 'change of weather'.


90% of Brits vacate in Dubai...so cultural experience is surely the reason.
 
2014-06-09 11:14:36 AM  
Yeah, cuz like Americans don't travel and stuff!  It's just meth and Wal-Mart for us toofless folks!
 
2014-06-09 11:16:25 AM  

Rigby-Reardon: Yet a large portion of the US population refers to 3/4 of the US as "flyover country".


I've always referred to it as "drive-thru country."

/alternately "bat country"
 
2014-06-09 11:17:45 AM  
fastfxr:
90% of Brits vacate in Dubai..

What the actual shiat are you talking about?
 
2014-06-09 11:17:59 AM  

Rigby-Reardon: Tigger: wingnut396: Tigger: Ant: Tigger: I think most people would suggest that the benefits of travel are more in the 'experiencing diversity of culture' side of things than 'change of weather'.

Different regions of the US have different cultural practices. Go to Atlanta and then to Seattle, and tell me those aren't two different cultures.

No one is disagreeing with that.

I was disagreeing with the ridiculous notion that the variance of culture within the US is the same as between the US and the rest of the world which is laughably untrue.

I think the poster was saying that culture variation within the US is just as broad as the variation in Europe. I don't buy it.  The variation between Amsterdam and Milan are far greater than Houston and NYC for instance.

But the peculiar thing to me is how often I see that stated. I've never really understood what drives that. There's usually some sort of internal psychological value to being wrong for the individual who is wrong; however, in this case I don't know what it could be.

I think some people feel it is part of national pride. Our country is bigger, we are just as diverse, our natural wonders are as good. Don't think they like to talk about Russia or Canada which are both bigger.

The same people bragging about how diverse the US is are probably the ones who push the hardest for English to be declared the official national language.

/This is America we speak American.


God forbid we have a way for everyone to communicate with each other which can only serve to bring us closer to the imaginary melting pot. But keep telling yourself its all about racism

/one language... i vote for Klingon
 
2014-06-09 11:18:57 AM  

cgraves67: I was in Britain several years ago. I asked our guide how far it is from the tip of Cornwall up to the tip of Scotland. He said it was about 700 miles. I responded that sounds like a full day's drive and he seemed astonished that a person could actually drive 700 miles in a day. I guess they don't have an interstate highway system like ours. I mean, we drove on some nice, fast motorways there, but they must not go everywhere. It definitely seemed like we didn't have the same sense of scale. The same goes with history. He showed us things that were 200-300 years old and we were impressed, but he seemed unenthusiastic about that because he could walk down the street and appreciate an 1,800 year old Roman ruin.


Someone here once said "In Europe 200 miles is a long drive. In America 200 years is a long time."

Different places, different senses of scale.
 
2014-06-09 11:19:07 AM  
thamike:

/alternately "bat country"

Can't stop there.
 
2014-06-09 11:20:45 AM  

Tigger: dittybopper: Tigger: The similarities culturally between Soiux Falls, SD, New York City and the Appalachians are far greater than the difference between any one of those places and anywhere in Europe or Asia.

I'm willing to bet that in your travels you stay in chain hotels, eat in chain restaurants, and work at corporation locations, so mostly, you don't get the local color.  You get the bland, averaged out experience.

And you would be totally and completely wrong.

But if you want to believe there's as much cultural variation within the US as there is between the USA and, say, South East Asia then I can't really stop you. It's just a bit weird.


Really?  I have neighbors from Guanzhou.  And Puerto Rico.  I work with a woman from the Philippines.  My stepmother is Thai.  And I'm not talking "grandparents are from", these are all actual immigrants.  And that's just off the top of my head without really thinking about it.

And I live and work in white-bread Bumfark upstate New York.

/Son is ethnically Korean.
//Well, half, at any rate.
 
2014-06-09 11:22:30 AM  
The extent of many American's international travel:

www.disneyfoodblog.com
 
2014-06-09 11:24:23 AM  

EvilEgg: The neat thing about America, is that you don't need to leave the country to find the climate of your choice for vacation.


True.  However, if I lived in America, I would probably like to travel to other countries, if only to lower my chances of being shot.

/trolling, trolling, trolling
 
2014-06-09 11:27:05 AM  
A lot of Americans ask, "What's a vacation?"
 
2014-06-09 11:31:30 AM  

Rigby-Reardon: You could argue that Canada is more diverse culturally with 2 national languages and a large area that speaks french almost exclusively.


Canada is as diverse as Belgium, and in the same way.

Texas is the US's Quebec.
 
2014-06-09 11:32:28 AM  

Rigby-Reardon: Why is everyone treating this like an either or question.

Travel around the US it is great. Tons to see tons to do.

Travel around the world. Tons to see tons to do.

The US has some diversity, but nothing like you will see going abroad.

You can travel to Puerto Rico without a passport, but it is much more Americanized than Mexico (once you get out of tourist areas).

First stamp in my passport was from Guam (on my way to Yap and Palau). The customs agent had to go find a stamp when I asked. Apparently not many Americans ask for stamps from a US territory.


Guam requires a passport?
 
2014-06-09 11:33:24 AM  

This text is now purple: Rigby-Reardon: You could argue that Canada is more diverse culturally with 2 national languages and a large area that speaks french almost exclusively.

Canada is as diverse as Belgium, and in the same way.

Texas is the US's Quebec.


I dunno...  I've never had a Texan get angry at me for speaking English....
 
2014-06-09 11:33:35 AM  
Meh, once you've been to Europe and seen the old buildings and such you don't have to go back. I'd like to go to Japan for giggles and maybe South Korea, but the rest of Asia isn't nearly as appealing.

For some reason, Africa and South American don't interest me much. Maybe Uruguay, to visit the old time gauchos and get in on some of that crazy BBQ scene they have going on down there.
 
2014-06-09 11:33:56 AM  

Tigger: fastfxr:
90% of Brits vacate in Dubai..

What the actual shiat are you talking about?


Well they obviously couldn't vacate in Britain, because they'd still be there.
 
2014-06-09 11:34:05 AM  

RTOGUY: Canada is larger, but less diverse. Russia is bigger and arguably has comparable diversity, but no one lives where most of the scenic occurs.

The comparable nation no one really talks about is China.

I've travelled across Canada everywhere except the far north (I'll get there!) and there is plenty of diversity but I do have to agree on the emptiness.


I was mostly pointing out that Canada lacks a tropics or a desert, but the US has everything Canada has.
 
2014-06-09 11:34:13 AM  

Rigby-Reardon: justanotherfarkinfarker: Rigby-Reardon: Don't think they like to talk about Russia or Canada which are both bigger.

Only if you count useless frozen space. Heck in the US we bomb the shiat out of or put casinos up in our deserts. And the desserts are good too.

Yet a large portion of the US population refers to 3/4 of the US as "flyover country".


Define "large portion" because I've only seen it referenced like that in NY or LA. TYMMV depending on where you live, I guess.
 
2014-06-09 11:37:04 AM  

Rigby-Reardon: justanotherfarkinfarker: Rigby-Reardon: Don't think they like to talk about Russia or Canada which are both bigger.

Only if you count useless frozen space. Heck in the US we bomb the shiat out of or put casinos up in our deserts. And the desserts are good too.

Yet a large portion of the US population refers to 3/4 of the US as "flyover country".


"Flyover country" includes the second and 5th-10th most populous states in the Union. Just those 7 states are 29% of the US population, or around 100 million people.
 
2014-06-09 11:39:02 AM  

wxboy: fireclown: . I can drive a car from the North of Canada to Buenos Aires

You'll need a ferry to get past the Darien Gap.


4x4icon.com

/probably obscure for you
 
2014-06-09 11:39:54 AM  

spawn73: Some countries don't have ID cards, eg. Denmark, so Danes needs to bring their passport regardless.


not true. Their driving licence is sufficient.

/Swede who crosses the bridge to work and only takes his ATM card with him, never had a problem.

Headso: but Italy has 60MM people


Holy crap! I knew that Italians were short, but that's craycray.
 
2014-06-09 11:41:53 AM  

GDubDub: A lot of Americans ask, "What's a vacation?"


Its a 3 hour drive with children who have to pee and a wife who wants to make a "quick stop" at the outlet mall...turning that drive into a 7 hour ordeal.

Its waking up 45 minutes later than you normally would on a work day and immediately grabbing your phone/laptop to see what emails you missed.

Its $4 for a bottle soda and kids running up to you to get $20 for tokens every 9 minutes.

Its standing in line for an hour and 45 minutes to enjoy a 3 minute long ride.

Its...beautiful


/Got a vacay coming next week.
//Can't wait.
 
2014-06-09 11:41:59 AM  

Nabb1: BunkyBrewman: That reminds me... how long does it take to get a passport nowadays?

The last time I did it, which was almost ten years ago (I guess it's time to renew), the turnaround was about three to four weeks. If you could show a genuine need to expedite it and paid an extra fee, you could get it with a turnaround time of a few days.


You can actually get one if a few hours if you drive to one of the offices that has the machinery on site. I can't recall if you have to show your airline ticket, but you do have to pay an extra fee. I did this with my ex since she didn't have one yet and we left with her passport after about a four hour wait.
 
2014-06-09 11:42:33 AM  

Land_of_the_Magic_Dragon: Rigby-Reardon: Why is everyone treating this like an either or question.

Travel around the US it is great. Tons to see tons to do.

Travel around the world. Tons to see tons to do.

The US has some diversity, but nothing like you will see going abroad.

You can travel to Puerto Rico without a passport, but it is much more Americanized than Mexico (once you get out of tourist areas).

First stamp in my passport was from Guam (on my way to Yap and Palau). The customs agent had to go find a stamp when I asked. Apparently not many Americans ask for stamps from a US territory.

Guam requires a passport?


Probably not. First trip off the mainland and I was excited to use my passport. We did have to go through a customs area, but it was area for US citizens. Customs agent left the area to get the stamp.

Probably could have used my drivers license.
 
2014-06-09 11:43:00 AM  
Was over in southern France at the begining of the year.  Me, my wife, 4 year old son, and 2 year old daughter for three months near Aix (actual village was Ginasservis ).  Only showed my passport at the border check in the Paris-De Gaulle airport on the way over there, and then in both P-D G and JFK on the way home.

No customs check going to Paris.  My bags stayed in the system (didn't have to pull them "off the plane" after I checked them in the U.S.).  Coming back through JFK was a nightmare though (seriously, fark that airport). All of my bags were pulled off the plane so I could say "I declare nothing" and not even opened up in front of me, only to be put back on the plane. All seven check on bags that my wife and I had to drag through the airport.

Traveling across borders over in Europe I did not see a single border patrol.  Just signs (we went to both Italy and Spain...just hopped across the border to say "I have been to Italy/Spain") and toll booths.

We did not have any issue getting the passports.  The only issue we had was trying to get a long term visa for my wife.  The project was supposed to be 6 months to a year.  While I could get one for working, the damn company was being stubborn on getting her one for "being my wife" so we just hell with it and opted for the short term 3 month visa.  That took over a year to figure out.  We really wanted to stay, but we were just so tired of the BS and paperwork, we just broke down and went for 3 months.  At least my son got to go to school and make some friends and learn some French (and not an "international" school, an actual french school in a small village).

There is talk about going back, but we are on the fence about it.  It was a wonderful experience but the travel is just exhausting and at the end of three months we were ready to be back home.
 
2014-06-09 11:44:15 AM  
So let's say the average, middle-class person, be they Brit and the US citizen have a travel radius of, oh, I don't know, 1,500 miles.  If you're in the US, chances are you're not going to get off the continent without traveling less than twice that distance.  Sure you can make it down to South America, but that's about your only option for cultural diversity - I mean let's be real, Canada isn't all that heterogeneous except for maybe Quebec.  But if you're in the UK, you'd fall just shy of getting to Rome (by about 200 miles), which means you'd be able to see the lion's share of continental Europe plus the Nordic countries without breaking much of a sweat.  I don't think US citizens are necessarily limited by the desire to travel and see other cultures so much as they are by simple geography and economics.  I feel fortunate to have been to Italy once as well as Australia, and I'd love to see a lot of other places around the world, but mostly when it comes to vacation planning, a trip to a New Jersey beach or a Kentucky distillery is an order of magnitude less expensive than flying across an ocean.
 
2014-06-09 11:46:31 AM  
I have a US passport and a UK passport.  While you can renew a UK 10-year passport up to 9 months in advance and carry the time left over to the new passport (i.e. have a new UK passport valid for 10 years and 9 months), stupidly you can't do it with a US passport.  That may not sound like a big deal, but there are many countries who won't let you over the border unless you have at least six months left on your passport.  So if you have a US passport with 25 weeks left on it and fly in to one of those countries, tough luck gringo, go home and pay for a new 10-year passport that's only accepted for 9 years and 6 months.
 
2014-06-09 11:50:06 AM  

Rixel: EvilEgg: The neat thing about America, is that you don't need to leave the country to find the climate of your choice for vacation.

True.  However, if I lived in America, I would probably like to travel to other countries, if only to lower my chances of being shot.

/trolling, trolling, trolling


Depending on where you live in America, and where you visit in Europe, your chances might actually increase.  By like several times.
 
2014-06-09 11:52:59 AM  

Nabb1: BunkyBrewman: That reminds me... how long does it take to get a passport nowadays?

The last time I did it, which was almost ten years ago (I guess it's time to renew), the turnaround was about three to four weeks. If you could show a genuine need to expedite it and paid an extra fee, you could get it with a turnaround time of a few days.


24 to 48 hours but you have to go to a state department office in person.  Plus it's a fark ton of money.

/Had to do a 24 hour renewal because I didn't know a lot of countries want the passport to be valid for at least 6 months beyond when you arrive in their country.
 
2014-06-09 11:54:21 AM  

thefonz37: So let's say the average, middle-class person, be they Brit and the US citizen have a travel radius of, oh, I don't know, 1,500 miles.  If you're in the US, chances are you're not going to get off the continent without traveling less than twice that distance.  Sure you can make it down to South America, but that's about your only option for cultural diversity - I mean let's be real, Canada isn't all that heterogeneous except for maybe Quebec.  But if you're in the UK, you'd fall just shy of getting to Rome (by about 200 miles), which means you'd be able to see the lion's share of continental Europe plus the Nordic countries without breaking much of a sweat.  I don't think US citizens are necessarily limited by the desire to travel and see other cultures so much as they are by simple geography and economics.  I feel fortunate to have been to Italy once as well as Australia, and I'd love to see a lot of other places around the world, but mostly when it comes to vacation planning, a trip to a New Jersey beach or a Kentucky distillery is an order of magnitude less expensive than flying across an ocean.


The only problem with your radius is the cost to travel to London, Paris, or Amsterdam from any major US airport can at times be cheaper than flying to a small US airport that is 1500 miles closer. Hub to hub flights occasionally be found for an unbelievably low price.

When my wife and I got married we decided to have the ceremony in Puerto Rico because it was about $300 round trip from Minneapolis at the time (lots of guests flying too, wanted tropical on the cheap). Miami flights were $100 more. Cancun was $200 more.
 
2014-06-09 12:04:10 PM  
Back in the day it was possible to score cheap fares for international flights by booking courier flights, but those have largely disappeared. You can often find less expensive airfares by going through flight consolidators, but you have to comparison shop for the best deals. Being flexible on dates helps too.
So far, I've been to 26 countries on 4 continents, and I have more trips planned. Don't let excuses keep you from seeing the world.
 
2014-06-09 12:08:22 PM  

Forbidden Doughnut: Tigger: This is a weird thing I hear people say a lot and it just isn't true. I travel for a living - primarily internationally but significantly within the USA. The similarities culturally between Soiux Falls, SD, New York City and the Appalachians are far greater than the difference between any one of those places and anywhere in Europe or Asia.

I've been to South Korea and Canada ( British Colombia ). Korea is like going to another planet, but Sydney, BC is almost like home, IMHO.

/ Pacific Northwest
// I feel more (culturally) at home with Canadians in BC than with Southerners here in the US...


Vancouver feels a lot like Seattle, except with fewer guns and more politeness. Everything east of Snoqualmie Pass, on the other hand, feels like another country.
 
2014-06-09 12:08:42 PM  

fireclown: EvilEgg: The neat thing about America, is that you don't need to leave the country to find the climate of your choice for vacation.

More importantly, you can drive for more than 4 hours and not change countries.  If we had to go past a border guard every time I crossed into Pennsylvania, more Marylanders would certainly have passports.   It's also why we only speak one or two languages.  I can drive a car from the North of Canada to Buenos Aires and only run into Two languages.  (If I miss Brazil an that weird part of Canada).


I think international travel is great, I just got back from Paris and Nice. I've always thought it was unfair to blast Americans for not traveling across the Atlantic or Pacific routinely, and not needing to learn more than English! Since in reality you rarely run into foreign speakers. Now, if someone in DC had to know a different language for each to visit Maryland, Virginia, and Pennsylvania, that would be more fair.
 
2014-06-09 12:08:55 PM  

dittybopper: Tigger: EvilEgg: The neat thing about America, is that you don't need to leave the country to find the climate of your choice for vacation.

I think most people would suggest that the benefits of travel are more in the 'experiencing diversity of culture' side of things than 'change of weather'.

The neat thing about America is you can do that also.


If you think that experiencing the true cultural diversity of our planet is something you can do inside the borders of your own country, you are sorely missing the point.
 
2014-06-09 12:11:41 PM  

Tigger: EvilEgg: The neat thing about America, is that you don't need to leave the country to find the climate of your choice for vacation.

I think most people would suggest that the benefits of travel are more in the 'experiencing diversity of culture' side of things than 'change of weather'.


It doesn't hurt that in Europe you can drive for an hour or 2 and be in another country. Here, I can drive 15 hours and still be in the 'states.

Location, Location, Location.

\I'm not flying *anywhere* while the TSA is f*cking up air travel
 
2014-06-09 12:12:00 PM  

jxb465: Nabb1: BunkyBrewman: That reminds me... how long does it take to get a passport nowadays?

The last time I did it, which was almost ten years ago (I guess it's time to renew), the turnaround was about three to four weeks. If you could show a genuine need to expedite it and paid an extra fee, you could get it with a turnaround time of a few days.

I just got one last year and it took about 3 or 4 weeks to get it. Maybe a little less. It was a lot faster than I was expecting.


Ms. Datanerd's renewal last year took about that long.
 
2014-06-09 12:12:38 PM  

Rigby-Reardon: Hub to hub flights occasionally be found for an unbelievably low price.


Not usually when the kids are not in school.

I had to get extra pages put in my passport at one time, because I worked in Hong Kong and made the most of the location.

I'm USA bound in NYC Metro now for economic and domestic (family) reasons. It is not for the lack of desire, it is because I can't take time off to fly around the world, neither can my wife.
 
Displayed 50 of 256 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report