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(News.com.au)   So, what happens when the ground crew improperly secures a $130 million aircraft? Let's ask Ryanair   (news.com.au) divider line 42
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5203 clicks; posted to Business » on 07 Jun 2014 at 8:32 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



42 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-06-07 07:15:04 AM  
Somebody forgot to pay the parking fee.
 
2014-06-07 07:43:02 AM  
That's what happens when you hire scabs during a strike.
 
2014-06-07 07:52:54 AM  
FTFA -  We are aware of reports that chocks were not in place

Basic aircraft ground handling dictates chocks put in place once the aircraft is parked on the spot.


Massive fail.
 
2014-06-07 08:46:02 AM  
It flew away.
 
2014-06-07 08:54:49 AM  
You are now free to move about the tarmac
 
2014-06-07 09:11:35 AM  
Based on RyanAir's reputation the probably did not pay the extra parking chocks fee.
 
2014-06-07 09:15:06 AM  

the_celt: FTFA -  We are aware of reports that chocks were not in place

Basic aircraft ground handling dictates chocks put in place once the aircraft is parked on the spot.


Massive fail.


This. I hope they have insurance that covers gross negligence.
 
2014-06-07 09:50:24 AM  
Will they bother to fix this?  Or will the next passenger load have to chip in for the repair costs?
 
2014-06-07 09:50:35 AM  

MmmmBacon: That's what happens when you hire scabs during a strike.


I assume that would be the airport then, not Ryanair.
 
2014-06-07 09:55:16 AM  
Couldn't happen to a nicer "airline".
 
2014-06-07 10:18:20 AM  
Probably the strikers took the chocks off.
 
2014-06-07 10:20:50 AM  
Nah, man! You can buff that right out!
 
2014-06-07 10:21:57 AM  
<I>"This is currently being replaced and the aircraft will shortly return to service," said spokesman Robin Kiely. </I>

And I'm sure we will never hear another thing about this aircraft, ever.
 
2014-06-07 10:27:38 AM  
Someone is getting fiiirrreeed.
 
2014-06-07 10:37:23 AM  
What with the damage to the guttering and the tail wing it sounds like a nightmare for them.
 
2014-06-07 11:22:17 AM  

stevenvictx: Probably the strikers took the chocks off.


This being Italy I'm going with "Nice airplane you got there...be too bad if something happened to it."
 
2014-06-07 11:22:36 AM  
They find out the jet is made of cardboard?
 
2014-06-07 11:43:47 AM  
Meh. A couple rolls of duct tape and some bailing wire ... good as new.
 
2014-06-07 12:21:15 PM  

Yaw String: Meh. A couple rolls of duct tape and some bailing wire ... good as new.


Don't forget the 550 cord and zip ties.

And some Gorrilla Glue for good measure.
 
2014-06-07 12:50:38 PM  
That's why they put erasers on pencils, shiat happens.
 
2014-06-07 01:02:23 PM  

zerkalo: <I>"This is currently being replaced and the aircraft will shortly return to service," said spokesman Robin Kiely. </I>

And I'm sure we will never hear another thing about this aircraft, ever.


Probably not. There are quite a few airliners that have been damaged a lot worse than this one and are still carrying passengers.
Looking at the pictures, it should be a pretty easy repair (just replace what is broken) and as long as the aft pressure bulkhead is ok, it will be good to go.
 
2014-06-07 01:21:22 PM  
how do you not chock the aircraft? how does the crew forget to set brakes? was it just sitting empty?

spent a year working ramp for delta, you'd have to work to fark up this bad.
 
2014-06-07 02:24:03 PM  

SuperT: how do you not chock the aircraft? how does the crew forget to set brakes? was it just sitting empty?

spent a year working ramp for delta, you'd have to work to fark up this bad.


Most aircraft (especially larger ones) don't sit with the brakes on. Routinely, as soon as a lineman gives me the hand signal that chokes are in, I disengage the "parking" brake. There are a couple of reasons to due so. Most "parking" brakes on airplanes simply trap hydraulic fluid under pressure to the brakes. What creates that pressure is either an engine-driven hydraulic pump, or an electrically powered hydraulic pump. Neither of which is left running after the aircraft is shut down. The trapped fluid can over time lose enough pressure that the brakes will no longer be hold the aircraft in place. Also hot hydraulic fluid expands. Set the brakes in Phoenix or Las Vegas after landing on a hot day and there is a good chance that pressure in the hydraulic lines will climb past what the system is designed for.

The other reason is parked aircraft sometimes need to be moved. Most line personnel do not have the required knowledge to set or release an aircraft's brakes. And a flight crew is not going to go out to the airport every time a plane needs to be towed around the apron.

This accident rests on the lineman not choking the wheels or removing the chokes before the aircraft was under power, or attached to a tug.
 
2014-06-07 02:30:36 PM  

wutchamacallem: What with the damage to the guttering and the tail wing it sounds like a nightmare for them.


Thank god the motors were ok.
 
2014-06-07 02:35:58 PM  
* chocks   ... damn auto-correct
 
2014-06-07 03:42:46 PM  

Two Dogs Farking: Couldn't happen to a nicer "airline".


Dunno what the percieved problem is with Ryan Air.

I used it several times, and it took me to where I paid for.
 
2014-06-07 04:46:15 PM  

the_celt: FTFA -  We are aware of reports that chocks were not in place

Basic aircraft ground handling dictates chocks put in place once the aircraft is parked on the spot.


Massive fail.


There is a strike by the baggage handlers, and this is semi-socialist Europe. I'd lay odds that a striking union worker got on to the field and removed the chocks after the fact. This is basically the sort of thing right out of the union strike playbook.

MmmmBacon: That's what happens when you hire scabs during a strike.


Baggage handlers != Ground crew. As I stated above, it is far more likely that a striker did the damage.
 
2014-06-07 04:52:28 PM  

Yaw String: SuperT: how do you not chock the aircraft? how does the crew forget to set brakes? was it just sitting empty?

spent a year working ramp for delta, you'd have to work to fark up this bad.

Most aircraft (especially larger ones) don't sit with the brakes on. Routinely, as soon as a lineman gives me the hand signal that chokes are in, I disengage the "parking" brake. There are a couple of reasons to due so. Most "parking" brakes on airplanes simply trap hydraulic fluid under pressure to the brakes. What creates that pressure is either an engine-driven hydraulic pump, or an electrically powered hydraulic pump. Neither of which is left running after the aircraft is shut down. The trapped fluid can over time lose enough pressure that the brakes will no longer be hold the aircraft in place. Also hot hydraulic fluid expands. Set the brakes in Phoenix or Las Vegas after landing on a hot day and there is a good chance that pressure in the hydraulic lines will climb past what the system is designed for.

The other reason is parked aircraft sometimes need to be moved. Most line personnel do not have the required knowledge to set or release an aircraft's brakes. And a flight crew is not going to go out to the airport every time a plane needs to be towed around the apron.

This accident rests on the lineman not choking the wheels or removing the chokes before the aircraft was under power, or attached to a tug.


On small piston popper level airplanes, you also don't like setting parking brake in cold weather, in that any water or slush can freeze the brakes solid. I don't fly heavy iron, but my guess is that it is similar. You also do not want most line crews climbing into your cockpit which they would need to do if brakes were set (or some would try to tow plane without checking to see if brakes are set).
 
2014-06-07 05:23:06 PM  
sdd2000:

On small piston popper level airplanes, you also don't like setting parking brake in cold weather, in that any water or slush can freeze the brakes solid. I don't fly heavy iron, but my guess is that it is similar. You also do not want most line crews climbing into your cockpit which they would need to do if brakes were set (or some would try to tow plane without checking to see if brakes are set).

Back a very long time ago, I had a crusty old instructor whose adage was : Never trust the brakes to work, and never trust them not to either.

He then goes on to tell the story of holding in position for takeoff, anticipating a small delay, then setting the parking brake so he wouldn't have sit there on the rudder pedals. Tower cleared him for t/o, and what happens? Parking brake release handle breaks off resulting in a blocked runway, go-arounds, and irritated planes waiting for takeoff. Moral: think where the plane is before using it.
 
2014-06-07 06:59:17 PM  
Crew Chief-101:  put the chocks in.  Lace them.  Unless you're fueling a C-5 Galaxy.  Then you better back them off 2 inches, otherwise you'll need the hammer of Thor to get them free later.  Happens all the time to newbies, love to see it happen.  Ah, good times...
 
2014-06-07 07:08:54 PM  

A10Mechanic: Crew Chief-101:  put the chocks in.  Lace them.  Unless you're fueling a C-5 Galaxy.  Then you better back them off 2 inches, otherwise you'll need the hammer of Thor to get them free later.  Happens all the time to newbies, love to see it happen.  Ah, good times...


I did that to a C-17 once. In all fairness, I didn't normally work the ramp, I was a volunteer that got pulled off of normal duties to help when extra aircraft came to visit. Considering I'm college educated and have taken physics and engineering courses, you'd think I'd know that the tires will compress when fuel (weight) is added, but nope, the thought didn't occur to me until it was too late.
 
2014-06-07 07:11:31 PM  
Oh, an Oblig:

www.edwards.af.mil
 
2014-06-07 07:37:29 PM  
"tail wing"?
 
2014-06-07 07:59:48 PM  
A $130 million 737?  Is all the internal wiring Monster Cable?
 
2014-06-07 08:34:05 PM  
You know the journalist is an aviation specialist by the use of the term "tail wing."
 
2014-06-07 09:52:05 PM  
"Drama at Ciampino airport, Rome, after a Ryanair Boeing 737 hits a fire station ripping apart its tail wing"

Sometimes commas really are important.

/not really a grammar nazi, but "journalists" should know better.
 
2014-06-07 10:30:57 PM  

The Green Intern: A $130 million 737?  Is all the internal wiring Monster Cable?


Seems a little high.  Here is the Boeing price sheet:

http://www.boeing.com/boeing/commercial/prices/

Top model is 110m average so being 20 above seems unlikely.
 
2014-06-07 10:47:50 PM  

Daedalus27: The Green Intern: A $130 million 737?  Is all the internal wiring Monster Cable?

Seems a little high.  Here is the Boeing price sheet:

http://www.boeing.com/boeing/commercial/prices/

Top model is 110m average so being 20 above seems unlikely.


You forget that this one was equipped with a tail wing, a luxury option.
 
2014-06-07 11:55:52 PM  
It sounds like the crewman responsible may have choked when he checked for chocks.

(chuckle)
 
2014-06-08 01:20:32 AM  

cyberspacedout: It sounds like the crewman responsible may have choked when he checked for chocks.

(chuckle)


cheeky
 
2014-06-08 03:09:34 AM  
A spokesman for Ciampino airport said: "We are investigating the cause of the incident and whether proper procedures were followed.

Probably not would be my guess ;)
 
2014-06-08 04:27:40 AM  

Yaw String: SuperT: how do you not chock the aircraft? how does the crew forget to set brakes? was it just sitting empty?

spent a year working ramp for delta, you'd have to work to fark up this bad.

Most aircraft (especially larger ones) don't sit with the brakes on. Routinely, as soon as a lineman gives me the hand signal that chokes are in, I disengage the "parking" brake. There are a couple of reasons to due so. Most "parking" brakes on airplanes simply trap hydraulic fluid under pressure to the brakes. What creates that pressure is either an engine-driven hydraulic pump, or an electrically powered hydraulic pump. Neither of which is left running after the aircraft is shut down. The trapped fluid can over time lose enough pressure that the brakes will no longer be hold the aircraft in place. Also hot hydraulic fluid expands. Set the brakes in Phoenix or Las Vegas after landing on a hot day and there is a good chance that pressure in the hydraulic lines will climb past what the system is designed for.

The other reason is parked aircraft sometimes need to be moved. Most line personnel do not have the required knowledge to set or release an aircraft's brakes. And a flight crew is not going to go out to the airport every time a plane needs to be towed around the apron.

This accident rests on the lineman not choking the wheels or removing the chokes before the aircraft was under power, or attached to a tug.


Five yourself a gold star, you glorious fark.

No sarcasm.
 
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