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(Huffington Post)   Verizon tells Netflix to stop telling customers the truth, or they will sue   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 67
    More: Dumbass, Netflix  
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6655 clicks; posted to Geek » on 05 Jun 2014 at 7:12 PM (7 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-06-05 05:01:02 PM
I would hazard a guess that Netflix would love to be sued. Imagine the opportunity to go ripping through Verizon's files, all in the name of pretrial discovery.
 
2014-06-05 06:43:03 PM
yeah Verizon doesn't want to pursue this, it will turn out very badly for them.

I would /love/ it if they did it though.
 
2014-06-05 06:55:28 PM
Verizon countered that the notification is "a PR stunt."


Sort of like sending an empty threat of a cease-and-desist letter, and then telling the media that you did so?
 
2014-06-05 06:58:38 PM
DO EET!
 
2014-06-05 07:19:52 PM

cannotsuggestaname: yeah Verizon doesn't want to pursue this, it will turn out very badly for them.

I would /love/ it if they did it though.


Except that Netflix would likely have to prove that it was, in fact, network congestion causing the problem and not any other issue.  If they've figured out a way to do that, good for them.  Otherwise they could be in trouble.
 
2014-06-05 07:21:51 PM
That's hilarious.. PLeeeeeeeeeeeeeease let this go to court...
 
2014-06-05 07:22:55 PM

rugman11: cannotsuggestaname: yeah Verizon doesn't want to pursue this, it will turn out very badly for them.

I would /love/ it if they did it though.

Except that Netflix would likely have to prove that it was, in fact, network congestion causing the problem and not any other issue.  If they've figured out a way to do that, good for them.  Otherwise they could be in trouble.


I'm sure Netflix NT and Lawyers department went over this decision with a fine tooth comb before committing to the new message.
 
2014-06-05 07:29:34 PM
Yes.  Name and shame the bastards in real time.  It may not instantly give customers more options in telecoms, but at least even the most uninformed couch potatoes will start to understand who the real bad guys are behind all this bullshiat
 
2014-06-05 07:29:56 PM

rugman11: cannotsuggestaname: yeah Verizon doesn't want to pursue this, it will turn out very badly for them.

I would /love/ it if they did it though.

Except that Netflix would likely have to prove that it was, in fact, network congestion causing the problem and not any other issue.  If they've figured out a way to do that, good for them.  Otherwise they could be in trouble.


It's entirely possible that they'd risk it for the chance to make Verizon's peering decision emails public. I wonder what their internal discussions were like.
 
2014-06-05 07:33:51 PM
Could someone tell Verizon to stop crippling speeds, stop blackmailing content providers to pay Verizon protection money, and start spending money on upgrading network capacitatiousness?
 
2014-06-05 07:42:45 PM

rugman11: Except that Netflix would likely have to prove that it was, in fact, network congestion causing the problem and not any other issue


Netflix is a new generation company that is big on data metrics.

http://ispspeedindex.netflix.com/usa

They know who the slowpokes are and have the data to back it up.
 
2014-06-05 07:47:14 PM

Jiro Dreams Of McRibs: Could someone tell Verizon to stop crippling speeds, stop blackmailing content providers to pay Verizon protection money, and start spending money on upgrading network capacitatiousness?


Verizon is rumored to have a FiOS network lying dormant in the greater Nashville area--fully installed and just waiting for someone to flip the switch, but they're just sitting on the infrastructure. I would suspect this is the case in other areas of the country. Maybe they're holding out for a buyer... Google perhaps?
 
2014-06-05 07:52:53 PM

lordargent: rugman11: Except that Netflix would likely have to prove that it was, in fact, network congestion causing the problem and not any other issue

Netflix is a new generation company that is big on data metrics.

http://ispspeedindex.netflix.com/usa

They know who the slowpokes are and have the data to back it up.


Right, but do they have the ability to distinguish between buffering caused by network congestion, buffering caused by a clogged peering point, and buffering caused by the user's own equipment and to deliver different buffering messages for each problem?  Because only one of those issues really warrants the statement "The Verizon network is clogged right now."
 
2014-06-05 07:53:01 PM
Say what you will about comcast but at least where I am, Ive been streaming netflix through them for a few years and never had choppiness or degradation.

My 3 choices are comcast, verizon and att uverse and ive never felt the need to switch.
 
2014-06-05 07:57:33 PM
I don't need a message from Netflix. I already blame Verizon.
 
2014-06-05 08:17:17 PM
Netflix is full of shiat. Wouldn't Amazon, HBOgo and Hulu also be getting hit also? Netflix been farking up since January on Comcast, Verizon and Uverse, and I highly doubt all three of them decided to say "fark it let's degrade Netflix all at once".
 
2014-06-05 08:19:32 PM

rugman11: Right, but do they have the ability to distinguish between buffering caused by network congestion, buffering caused by a clogged peering point, and buffering caused by the user's own equipment and to deliver different buffering messages for each problem?  Because only one of those issues really warrants the statement "The Verizon network is clogged right now."


Would they even have to prove that if they can point to documentation demonstrating Verizon offering to speed Netflix's traffic in exchange for money?  If Verizon is charging netflix for faster traffic to its customers, surely that is proof enough that the previous slowness was a result of Verizon's actions and/or whithin Verizon's control.
 
2014-06-05 08:20:15 PM

rugman11: lordargent: rugman11: Except that Netflix would likely have to prove that it was, in fact, network congestion causing the problem and not any other issue

Netflix is a new generation company that is big on data metrics.

http://ispspeedindex.netflix.com/usa

They know who the slowpokes are and have the data to back it up.

Right, but do they have the ability to distinguish between buffering caused by network congestion, buffering caused by a clogged peering point, and buffering caused by the user's own equipment and to deliver different buffering messages for each problem?  Because only one of those issues really warrants the statement "The Verizon network is clogged right now."



Can't a simple traceroute find the bottleneck?
 
2014-06-05 08:21:03 PM

Doooooooooo eeeeeeeeeitttt!

Please, please, please, Verizon, give it your best shot. We already know that you, Comcast, and others are throttling traffi from Netflix, Amazon, and other sites. You're hoping to get net neutrality thrown out before enough evidence is amassed to prove that you've constructed your own tiered online world. You're terrified that this will be used to escalate the call that ISPs are legislated and regulated as common carriers.

In short, it's time you assholes stopped trying to wring every drop of money from everyone, and actually step up on your decade-plus-old promises to move this country into the same arena, technologically speaking, as Japan, South Korea, and other countries that invested in their fiber optic networks and solved their "last mile" problems. Instead, you assholes took all the money you could - government subsidies, fees charged specifically for network improvements, general rate increases - and continue to coast on 40-year-old technology & an infrastructure much older than that. Now, instead of improving infrastructure and spending the money we gave you to do so, you assholes want to instead throttle traffic and establish a "class system", so that "VIP users" (read "folks screwed yet again by ISPs for more money") can get unfettered access and "lowly scum" (read "everyone else") can get stuck with metered access, or 10Gb/month limits, or whatever else you think will make you more money without more work.
 
2014-06-05 08:21:08 PM

Igor Jakovsky: Say what you will about comcast but at least where I am, Ive been streaming netflix through them for a few years and never had choppiness or degradation.

My 3 choices are comcast, verizon and att uverse and ive never felt the need to switch.


That's likely why you've never seen the slow downs.  If you lived in one of the many areas that don't have any real choices / competition then comcast wouldn't give and shiat.
 
2014-06-05 08:21:54 PM

drjekel_mrhyde: Netflix is full of shiat. Wouldn't Amazon, HBOgo and Hulu also be getting hit also? Netflix been farking up since January on Comcast, Verizon and Uverse, and I highly doubt all three of them decided to say "fark it let's degrade Netflix all at once".


rugman11nailed it. Find the network bottleneck is a fun game, if you're into that sort of thing. Most of us aren't. Odd that this comes up during the net neutrality discussion.
 
2014-06-05 08:24:51 PM

drjekel_mrhyde: Netflix is full of shiat. Wouldn't Amazon, HBOgo and Hulu also be getting hit also? Netflix been farking up since January on Comcast, Verizon and Uverse, and I highly doubt all three of them decided to say "fark it let's degrade Netflix all at once".


They are, actually. They have been for months. There's a reason Netflix and Comcast came to a financial arrangement regarding access. There's a reason that, in February, evidence clearly showing that Netflix and Amazon AWS were being throttled by major ISPs, including all of the folks you just pointed out.

In short, yes, all three of them (and others) have been discussing this very issue. That's why "net neutrality" is so important - the industry has colluded on the construction of a tiered Internet, but they can't do it until they're assured that their intended actions will become legal. Netflix is, unfortunately, the poster child of what happens when net neutrality goes away. Right now, net neutrality is in limbo - the FCC and Congress could resolve this in a matter of days, by ensuring that all telecommunications providers, regardless of what's on the wire or in the air, are treated as common carriers.
 
2014-06-05 08:26:29 PM

drjekel_mrhyde: Netflix is full of shiat. Wouldn't Amazon, HBOgo and Hulu also be getting hit also?


No, they wouldn't necessarily.  We don't have Net Neutrality, after all.
 
2014-06-05 08:32:27 PM

drjekel_mrhyde: Netflix is full of shiat. Wouldn't Amazon, HBOgo and Hulu also be getting hit also? Netflix been farking up since January on Comcast, Verizon and Uverse, and I highly doubt all three of them decided to say "fark it let's degrade Netflix all at once".


Not necessarily, the ISPs are very capable of causing problems for only Netflix, and I have absolutely zero qualms about assuming that they'd do so intentionally to harm Netflix.

Netflix accounts for 32% of all downstream internet traffic at peak times. This is essentially "new" internet traffic that didn't exist five or ten years ago. The ISPs hate this, because suddenly it's glaringly obvious just how much they've oversubscribed their network. Some providers have built modern networks capable of handling streaming video to their customers, a lot have not. Take a wild guess at the ones who haven't.
 
2014-06-05 08:35:00 PM

HeartBurnKid: drjekel_mrhyde: Netflix is full of shiat. Wouldn't Amazon, HBOgo and Hulu also be getting hit also?

No, they wouldn't necessarily.  We don't have Net Neutrality, after all.


Exactly HBOgo and Hulu are owned by the networks.  Hmmm I wonder why they don't have problems.
 
2014-06-05 08:36:08 PM
Also, consider that most of these ISPs are very snug in bed with traditional content distributors (that is, they also sell cable TV). They've got a huge perverse financial incentive to dissuade people from using alternative content sources like Netflix (or Hulu or Amazon Streaming, but those are small fish).
 
2014-06-05 08:36:22 PM

Ambivalence: rugman11: Right, but do they have the ability to distinguish between buffering caused by network congestion, buffering caused by a clogged peering point, and buffering caused by the user's own equipment and to deliver different buffering messages for each problem?  Because only one of those issues really warrants the statement "The Verizon network is clogged right now."

Would they even have to prove that if they can point to documentation demonstrating Verizon offering to speed Netflix's traffic in exchange for money?  If Verizon is charging netflix for faster traffic to its customers, surely that is proof enough that the previous slowness was a result of Verizon's actions and/or whithin Verizon's control.


That's not really what's happening, though.  If the Verizon/Netflix issue is the same as the Comcast/Netflix issue then it's a peering problem, which is technically both sides' faults.  Just because Verizon is asking Netflix for money to fix the problem doesn't mean it's their network causing it.  It's the connection between the two.

If that's the problem anyway.

LiberalWeenie: Can't a simple traceroute find the bottleneck?


Maybe?  I have no doubt they've thought this all through and gotten the proper data and legal support.  I could also see them doing this an "F You" to all the ISPs for causing them so many issues.
 
2014-06-05 08:38:00 PM

rugman11: lordargent: rugman11: Except that Netflix would likely have to prove that it was, in fact, network congestion causing the problem and not any other issue

Netflix is a new generation company that is big on data metrics.

http://ispspeedindex.netflix.com/usa

They know who the slowpokes are and have the data to back it up.

Right, but do they have the ability to distinguish between buffering caused by network congestion, buffering caused by a clogged peering point, and buffering caused by the user's own equipment and to deliver different buffering messages for each problem?  Because only one of those issues really warrants the statement "The Verizon network is clogged right now."


I'd guess they can tell the difference between 1 and 2 with minimal diagnostics, and 3 in most cases would still lead to the statement being true.  Verizon's standard procedure is to provide a wireless router, meaning the user's equipment is still within the boundaries of Verizon's network.
 
2014-06-05 08:38:09 PM

Igor Jakovsky: Say what you will about comcast but at least where I am, Ive been streaming netflix through them for a few years and never had choppiness or degradation.

My 3 choices are comcast, verizon and att uverse and ive never felt the need to switch.


I get two choices. Comcast or Go Fark Yourself.
 
2014-06-05 08:41:59 PM

Tom_Slick: HeartBurnKid: drjekel_mrhyde: Netflix is full of shiat. Wouldn't Amazon, HBOgo and Hulu also be getting hit also?

No, they wouldn't necessarily.  We don't have Net Neutrality, after all.

Exactly HBOgo and Hulu are owned by the networks.  Hmmm I wonder why they don't have problems.


Except that, with the exception of Comcast, the cable companies and the networks aren't owned by the same people.  Cable companies would actually have MORE incentive to throttle Hulu and HBOGo because those services are used to replace traditional viewing, as opposed to Netflix, which is usually used to supplement (i.e. you can't watch new shows on Netflix).
 
2014-06-05 08:43:32 PM

drjekel_mrhyde: Netflix is full of shiat. Wouldn't Amazon, HBOgo and Hulu also be getting hit also? Netflix been farking up since January on Comcast, Verizon and Uverse, and I highly doubt all three of them decided to say "fark it let's degrade Netflix all at once".


I don't know about Amazon but HBOgo isn't in the same league as Netflix for data usage,  you have to have HBO on cable to even be able to use HBOgo,  it's just not nearly as big.

Hulu is owned by NBC(Comcast) / Fox / Disney(ABS),  they're just fine with that traffic going over their servers.  Just like how their own Internet phone offerings work perfectly but other IP phone providers like Vonage have had issues in the past.

They want you using their offerings and if they can't have that then they will degrade service and ask for payment at both ends,  double dipping,  it's bullshiat.
 
2014-06-05 08:49:47 PM

drjekel_mrhyde: Netflix is full of shiat. Wouldn't Amazon, HBOgo and Hulu also be getting hit also? Netflix been farking up since January on Comcast, Verizon and Uverse, and I highly doubt all three of them decided to say "fark it let's degrade Netflix all at once".


Absolutely zero problems on Frontier FiOS (formerly Verizon) for years now.  Yup, I'd say it's a region/provider-specific problem.

Remember: All of those providers perform packet-shaping.
 
2014-06-05 09:16:25 PM
I just want to know how HuffPost manages to lock my iPhone's browser so I can't bring up the navigation bars!

I'm making a mental note to never follow a link to them again.
 
2014-06-05 09:38:14 PM
A multi national corporation wants to sue another multi national corporation to keep the fact that its holding the internet hostage secret?

They really dont understand how the internet works.

You should have put a clause in the contract before you started cashing the checks dumbasses.
 
2014-06-05 09:40:50 PM

drjekel_mrhyde: Netflix is full of shiat. Wouldn't Amazon, HBOgo and Hulu also be getting hit also? Netflix been farking up since January on Comcast, Verizon and Uverse, and I highly doubt all three of them decided to say "fark it let's degrade Netflix all at once".


A whole lot can depend on how CDNs are configured.  If your DNS shops you out to a crappy overloaded CDN, or claims you are somewhere you are not, you get big time suckiness.

Earthlink shares cable modem access with Brighthouse in my area.  A year ago Youtube was almost unusable on it, but regular BHN people had no issue. Talk on dslreports was that it was due to how the CDN stuff was configured.

Whatever it was, its been much better recently

/and cable companies would never ever collude, eh?
 
2014-06-05 09:47:55 PM

rugman11: Ambivalence: rugman11: Right, but do they have the ability to distinguish between buffering caused by network congestion, buffering caused by a clogged peering point, and buffering caused by the user's own equipment and to deliver different buffering messages for each problem?  Because only one of those issues really warrants the statement "The Verizon network is clogged right now."

Would they even have to prove that if they can point to documentation demonstrating Verizon offering to speed Netflix's traffic in exchange for money?  If Verizon is charging netflix for faster traffic to its customers, surely that is proof enough that the previous slowness was a result of Verizon's actions and/or whithin Verizon's control.

That's not really what's happening, though.  If the Verizon/Netflix issue is the same as the Comcast/Netflix issue then it's a peering problem, which is technically both sides' faults.  Just because Verizon is asking Netflix for money to fix the problem doesn't mean it's their network causing it.  It's the connection between the two.

If that's the problem anyway.

LiberalWeenie: Can't a simple traceroute find the bottleneck?

Maybe?  I have no doubt they've thought this all through and gotten the proper data and legal support.  I could also see them doing this an "F You" to all the ISPs for causing them so many issues.


Peering is not "technically both sides fault".   ISPs are intentionally slacking on upgrading their side of peering connections.

Just 6 months ago VZ got the FCC's Open Internet Order by the FCC overturned.  I'm curious why you think it's strange that since that court victory all of the big ISPs are demanding money from Netflix and also seem to be having trouble?

It's not just Netflix either -- Youtube is often a problem as well.  And VZ has done this to Level3 and Cogent.

Comcast and VZ are asking content providers to pay for transit when it is their customers who are requesting traffic, it's not transit.

btw VZ is currently 48 and 59 out of 60 ranked ISPs by Netflix (FiOS and DSL).

tracert shows you the latency of each hop, there are also other more advanced tools.  But next time your connection slows down run a tracert and watch which hop is the slowest to respond. I'll bet you anything it is right between your ISP and a backbone provider (this just proves it is not Netflix or YouTube).  You cant tell from tracert which side of the peer is failing to upgrade their routers/ports.  But, it shouldn't really surprise you that it is the ISPs -- they are the ones demanding money to "fix" an artificial problem.  If the problem was the fault of Netflix/Google/Cogent/Level3 etc, Verizon/Comcast/ATT wouldn't be asking for money, they would be asking for the other side to upgrade. But instead the ISPs are saying "oh woe is us, we cant spend 0.2% of our revenue even though we have a 95%+ margin."

This story explains it all very well:

http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2013/07/why-youtube-bu ff ers-the-secret-deals-that-make-and-break-online-video/
 
2014-06-05 10:10:47 PM
I just wanted to say I have NO problems on Charter. No throttling, no slowdown.
 
2014-06-05 10:14:54 PM

rugman11: Tom_Slick: HeartBurnKid: drjekel_mrhyde: Netflix is full of shiat. Wouldn't Amazon, HBOgo and Hulu also be getting hit also?

No, they wouldn't necessarily.  We don't have Net Neutrality, after all.

Exactly HBOgo and Hulu are owned by the networks.  Hmmm I wonder why they don't have problems.

Except that, with the exception of Comcast, the cable companies and the networks aren't owned by the same people.  Cable companies would actually have MORE incentive to throttle Hulu and HBOGo because those services are used to replace traditional viewing, as opposed to Netflix, which is usually used to supplement (i.e. you can't watch new shows on Netflix).


Comcast doesn't NEED to throttle HBO Go. They just  deny Roku and other set top box users the clearance to access it. Problem solved. I suspect the Amazon Fire TV will be the same, since it's that way for Showtime Anytime already.

Almost every other cable company allows access to HBO Go and Showtime Anytime on the Roku and Fire TV, but Comcast has had customers SCREAMING for them to verify their subscriptions and allow access, and they've completely ignored the requests.
 
2014-06-05 10:23:18 PM

rugman11: Tom_Slick: HeartBurnKid: drjekel_mrhyde: Netflix is full of shiat. Wouldn't Amazon, HBOgo and Hulu also be getting hit also?

No, they wouldn't necessarily.  We don't have Net Neutrality, after all.

Exactly HBOgo and Hulu are owned by the networks.  Hmmm I wonder why they don't have problems.

Except that, with the exception of Comcast, the cable companies and the networks aren't owned by the same people.  Cable companies would actually have MORE incentive to throttle Hulu and HBOGo because those services are used to replace traditional viewing, as opposed to Netflix, which is usually used to supplement (i.e. you can't watch new shows on Netflix).


If they throttle Hulu and HBO, they risk pissing off their cash cows.  Netflix has no such clout.
 
2014-06-05 10:29:41 PM
I work for a cable/interwebs/phone company (RCN).  We're a little company, don't even cover a complete state yet.  Know how we dealt with the "Netflix problem"?   We have a couple servers on our network that mirror the entire Netflix library.  When you stream something from Netflix, it doesn't even go outside of our network.  Does it still cause a whole ton of traffic on our network?  Absolutely.  Does it cause all kinds of problems?  Absolutely not.  We've got the capacity for it and more besides.  It's not a threat to our network.

If we can do that, anyone else can.  They don't because they don't want to.
 
2014-06-05 10:42:27 PM

Cpl.D: I work for a cable/interwebs/phone company (RCN).  We're a little company, don't even cover a complete state yet.  Know how we dealt with the "Netflix problem"?   We have a couple servers on our network that mirror the entire Netflix library.  When you stream something from Netflix, it doesn't even go outside of our network.  Does it still cause a whole ton of traffic on our network?  Absolutely.  Does it cause all kinds of problems?  Absolutely not.  We've got the capacity for it and more besides.  It's not a threat to our network.

If we can do that, anyone else can.  They don't because they don't want to.


Small ISPs are usually much more highly regarded by consumers. At a certain size the bean counters move in and suddenly the name of the game is to extract as much profit as possible and maximize stock price.
 
2014-06-05 10:43:34 PM

HeartBurnKid: If they throttle Hulu and HBO, they risk pissing off their cash cows.  Netflix has no such clout.


"Dear valued Netflix customer!  Starting July 1, 2014, Netflix will be forced to charge a one dollar a month "Malfeasant ISP" charge to customers of any ISP that has intentionally throttled our traffic for the purposes of extorting higher peering fees.  We will be happy to remove this charge and even return any fees collected at the point your ISP enforces Net Neutrality.  For more information, please contact your service provider."

Within six hours heads would be on pikes.
 
2014-06-05 11:18:58 PM
The image of Verizon lawyers trying to extract even the tiniest amount of sympathy from a jury is most amusing.
 
2014-06-05 11:29:06 PM
This is just a precursor to major commercial network providers lobbying Congress for legislation prohibiting any content provider from blaming a user's ISP for slow transfer speeds, even if the claim is true.
 
2014-06-06 12:03:47 AM

Cpl.D: I work for a cable/interwebs/phone company (RCN).  We're a little company, don't even cover a complete state yet.  Know how we dealt with the "Netflix problem"?   We have a couple servers on our network that mirror the entire Netflix library.  When you stream something from Netflix, it doesn't even go outside of our network.  Does it still cause a whole ton of traffic on our network?  Absolutely.  Does it cause all kinds of problems?  Absolutely not.  We've got the capacity for it and more besides.  It's not a threat to our network.

If we can do that, anyone else can.  They don't because they don't want to.


How does this work for verification of accounts? Do you have any customer data on your systems for verification? How does this tie in with Netflix?

Say I am on your network and my TV requests a Netflix show. How does it get redirected?
 
2014-06-06 12:34:44 AM

saturn badger: Cpl.D: I work for a cable/interwebs/phone company (RCN).  We're a little company, don't even cover a complete state yet.  Know how we dealt with the "Netflix problem"?   We have a couple servers on our network that mirror the entire Netflix library.  When you stream something from Netflix, it doesn't even go outside of our network.  Does it still cause a whole ton of traffic on our network?  Absolutely.  Does it cause all kinds of problems?  Absolutely not.  We've got the capacity for it and more besides.  It's not a threat to our network.

If we can do that, anyone else can.  They don't because they don't want to.

How does this work for verification of accounts? Do you have any customer data on your systems for verification? How does this tie in with Netflix?

Say I am on your network and my TV requests a Netflix show. How does it get redirected?


Probably filters based on IP address.  They know their customer's use xyz IP range and know to redirect that range to the local Netflix server....Netflix still does all the account verification.  Not sure, but Netflix may have even paid for some of the hardware for his ISP.

I bet they don't care for Netflix over VPN considering they have the local infrastructure for it.
 
2014-06-06 12:50:37 AM
saturn badger: How does this work for verification of accounts? Do you have any customer data on your systems for verification? How does this tie in with Netflix?

Say I am on your network and my TV requests a Netflix show. How does it get redirected?


Excellent questions.  Answer to both is "I don't know, but I'll ask around tomorrow and find out."
 
2014-06-06 01:03:38 AM
south park nipple rub .gif
 
2014-06-06 03:42:41 AM

Boo_Guy: Igor Jakovsky: Say what you will about comcast but at least where I am, Ive been streaming netflix through them for a few years and never had choppiness or degradation.

My 3 choices are comcast, verizon and att uverse and ive never felt the need to switch.

That's likely why you've never seen the slow downs.  If you lived in one of the many areas that don't have any real choices / competition then comcast wouldn't give and shiat.


Except... Isn't Comcast in the middle of merging with AT$T? Then he has shiat sandwich vs giant douche once again.

Google will then fark them all with a low orbit network of ubiquitous wifi satellites capable of free or cheap access.
 
2014-06-06 04:00:02 AM

wildcardjack: Boo_Guy: Igor Jakovsky: Say what you will about comcast but at least where I am, Ive been streaming netflix through them for a few years and never had choppiness or degradation.

My 3 choices are comcast, verizon and att uverse and ive never felt the need to switch.

That's likely why you've never seen the slow downs.  If you lived in one of the many areas that don't have any real choices / competition then comcast wouldn't give and shiat.

Except... Isn't Comcast in the middle of merging with AT$T? Then he has shiat sandwich vs giant douche once again.

Google will then fark them all with a low orbit network of ubiquitous wifi satellites capable of free or cheap access.


They're trying to merge,  yes.  And actually have the balls to say it's good for customers and competition with a straight face.

I hope google builds fiber across the entire country.
 
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