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(Aviation Week)   "Scientists believe that if there is life in the Solar System, they will find it in the next 25 years." But to find it, we'll have to ignore the monolith's directive regarding Europa   (aviationweek.com) divider line 18
    More: Cool, solar system, scientists believe, aliens, Europa, John Grotzinger, Cassini Probe, Northern Arizona University, ice planet  
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955 clicks; posted to Geek » on 05 Jun 2014 at 5:22 PM (28 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



18 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-06-05 03:29:26 PM  
What a pointless thing to say
 
2014-06-05 03:54:02 PM  
www.thespacereview.com
 
2014-06-05 05:22:31 PM  

Contrabulous Flabtraption: What a pointless thing to say


I agree. This one from the article is even more pointless:

"Missions underway, planned or under study to Mars, Enceladus, Europa and other potential watery places around the Sun should be able to settle the age-old question 'Are we alone?'"

Yeah, because if we don't find something, that question is settled. *sigh*
 
2014-06-05 05:25:22 PM  
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2014-06-05 05:34:16 PM  
Europa, Enceladus, and Ganymede should be the prime targets of any investigation. Mars is kind of a dead end (no pun intended), I think.

I wish that Stephen Baxter were right and that this were a star system teeming with life in every place we looked, but that's simply not appearing to be true. It's a shame.
 
2014-06-05 05:46:18 PM  
SETI has been saying that every 5 years for decades.
 
2014-06-05 05:48:36 PM  

Lord Dimwit: Mars is kind of a dead end (no pun intended), I think.


Is this the joke?
www.maxi-fond-ecran.com
 
2014-06-05 05:53:41 PM  

Lord Dimwit: Europa, Enceladus, and Ganymede should be the prime targets of any investigation. Mars is kind of a dead end (no pun intended), I think.

I wish that Stephen Baxter were right and that this were a star system teeming with life in every place we looked, but that's simply not appearing to be true. It's a shame.


Could you recommend a couple of his books? I read the Manifold series and enjoyed them, just wasn't sure where else to go.
 
2014-06-05 06:10:44 PM  
When Kubrick made 2001, he actually explored heavily taking out an insurance policy that would offer him some protection in the event that alien life was discovered prior to completing the film.   He thought that eventuality was quite plausible.
 
2014-06-05 06:11:32 PM  

Arachnophobe: Lord Dimwit: Europa, Enceladus, and Ganymede should be the prime targets of any investigation. Mars is kind of a dead end (no pun intended), I think.

I wish that Stephen Baxter were right and that this were a star system teeming with life in every place we looked, but that's simply not appearing to be true. It's a shame.

Could you recommend a couple of his books? I read the Manifold series and enjoyed them, just wasn't sure where else to go.


I enjoyed the Xelee Squence. Ring was good, and I actually read it before I knew it was part of a collection of books, and it still read okay. Vacuum Diagrams is a condensed history of the Xeelee Sequence in essence; it's a collection of short stories from that universe. It stands on its own as well.
 
2014-06-05 06:15:02 PM  

T.rex: When Kubrick made 2001, he actually explored heavily taking out an insurance policy that would offer him some protection in the event that alien life was discovered prior to completing the film.   He thought that eventuality was quite plausible.


Ahhh...I guess even Kubrick part took of the LSD craze of the 60's.
 
2014-06-05 06:17:00 PM  

Lord Dimwit: Arachnophobe: Lord Dimwit: Europa, Enceladus, and Ganymede should be the prime targets of any investigation. Mars is kind of a dead end (no pun intended), I think.

I wish that Stephen Baxter were right and that this were a star system teeming with life in every place we looked, but that's simply not appearing to be true. It's a shame.

Could you recommend a couple of his books? I read the Manifold series and enjoyed them, just wasn't sure where else to go.

I enjoyed the Xelee Squence. Ring was good, and I actually read it before I knew it was part of a collection of books, and it still read okay. Vacuum Diagrams is a condensed history of the Xeelee Sequence in essence; it's a collection of short stories from that universe. It stands on its own as well.


Coolness, thank you. Just added Vacuum Diagrams to the ol' Kindle wishlist. Kinda surprised the Xeelee Sequence doesn't have a Kindle version.
 
2014-06-05 06:17:23 PM  
You know what the best part about life elsewhere in the Solar System is? The fact that is implies that there's a lot of life everywhere in the Universe too.
 
2014-06-05 06:48:03 PM  
Scientists believe that if there is life in the Solar System, they will find it in the next 25 years.

No, "they" don't. This is one job I'll never accept, I'll always refuse to do that one thing: Give bullshiat time estimates.

Look I know just fine how long it'll take me to plug your headset jack back in for you, after you pulled it out of your computer accidentally. I'm not stupid. It will take me less than a minute. Stay sitting in your chair. (Unless you're not a nice looking 20yo secretary like in Hackers, then get up and go do something else while I'm down here. Take the smell of your ham buns with you.)

But anything that's never been done before I have no idea.
"Oh I don't know, I have to get in there to see first."
"Can you give us a ballpark estimate? Something?"
"What, did you hear this is how business dudes talk? Is that where you got that from? No, I can't give you a 'ballpark estimate' on recovering an encrypted partition that seems corrupted/salvaging your car that your daughter in law may or may not have stolen from your driveway and driven into a ditch/finding aliens. I can tell you to get your most recent backups out and start working from them no matter how old/I hope you have something else to drive and start looking for your insurance info on your car/you should make some human friends because waiting for aliens would be stupid."
"Uh ok maybe you're just not cut out for this job then. Or any job. We really need an idea how long this will take."
"So no one has found ET before but you really want little green eggs and ham and you think someone else will know better than I will? Anyone who gives you an answer is lying to you. At first everyone says 'just give a guess and we can adjust it later' but look what happens. Everyone starts taking your guess seriously. And then suddenly it's a big problem when you (inevitably) guessed wrong - the answer might be 'never.' Ok I'll just leave and you can call me back when you figure out no one knows any better than I do. "

/idiots who have no business talking to their workers
//Rant Mode!
///DEACTIVATE
 
2014-06-05 07:54:52 PM  
imgs.xkcd.com
 
2014-06-06 12:23:51 AM  
FTFA: Scientists believe that if there is life in the Solar System, they will find it in the next 25 years.

As a life form already known to be present in the Solar System, I'd like to complement the articles author on his exemplary reporting ability.
 
2014-06-06 12:15:40 PM  

mcreadyblue: T.rex: When Kubrick made 2001, he actually explored heavily taking out an insurance policy that would offer him some protection in the event that alien life was discovered prior to completing the film.   He thought that eventuality was quite plausible.

Ahhh...I guess even Kubrick part took of the LSD craze of the 60's.


He actually managed his visions without chemical assistance. He thought drugs would dull his edge. I find this pretty astounding.
 
2014-06-06 01:00:32 PM  

tbriggs: mcreadyblue: T.rex: When Kubrick made 2001, he actually explored heavily taking out an insurance policy that would offer him some protection in the event that alien life was discovered prior to completing the film.   He thought that eventuality was quite plausible.

Ahhh...I guess even Kubrick part took of the LSD craze of the 60's.

He actually managed his visions without chemical assistance. He thought drugs would dull his edge. I find this pretty astounding.


i just read this very thing the other day about him.... That he didn't feel drugs would serve the artist.  It would make the artist believe everything he was doing was great, rather than being selective about what he is including in the final product.... If the audience wants to trip out, so be it, but the artist has a responsibility to present a refined vision.
 
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