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(IT World)   Obsolete technology has given our language lots of things, aside from Clippy jokes   (itworld.com ) divider line
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1869 clicks; posted to Geek » on 05 Jun 2014 at 12:57 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-06-05 10:29:15 AM  
Deslided for your viewing pleasure
 
2014-06-05 10:29:59 AM  
Endive Wombat: Deslided for your viewing pleasure

Dammit, let's try again
 
2014-06-05 10:32:39 AM  
Early in my tech support career, I was talking a complete neophyte through a procedure and told them to
type out a command and hit the Return key.

"Which one is that?"

It threw me for a moment, then when I looked at the keyboard, I saw that it had 'Enter' printed on it, not
'Return'. That is how tech unsavvy my customer was, and how complacent I had become since I'd never
actually bothered to read the keyboard of the computers I was supporting at the time.

To this day I often call it 'Enter' instead of 'Return' precisely for that reason.
 
2014-06-05 10:53:19 AM  
haywire (n.)
"soft wire for binding bales of hay," by 1891, from hay + wire (n.). Adjective meaning "poorly equipped, makeshift" is 1905, American English, from the sense of something only held together with haywire, particularly said to be from use of the stuff in New England lumber camps for jury-rigging and makeshift purposes, so that hay wire outfit became the "contemptuous term for loggers with poor logging equipment" [Bryant, "Logging," 1913]. Its springy, uncontrollable quality led to the sense in go haywire (by 1915).
 
2014-06-05 11:05:05 AM  
It's interesting how words slip in and even when their meaning becomes obscured by new tech, people don't give the apparent disconnect a second thought.

I've been telling my kid "Dont' forget to tape Mythbusters tomorrow' since he was about six and we've never owned a tape based recording device of any sort in his lifetime and I don't think he's ever asked 'WTF is tape?'
 
2014-06-05 11:19:18 AM  

Sybarite: Its springy, uncontrollable quality led to the sense in go haywire

duct tape.

Modernized for my amusement.
 
2014-06-05 12:25:59 PM  
We still use the hard disk icon for the Save button. Gmail has started using just a down arrow icon.
 
2014-06-05 12:52:41 PM  

Uranus Megahertz: We still use the hard disk icon for the Save button. Gmail has started using just a down arrow icon.


Which could be confused with accessing the Download screen on certain web browsers (Firefox, for example)....
 
2014-06-05 01:16:24 PM  

Uranus Megahertz: We still use the hard disk icon for the Save button. Gmail has started using just a down arrow icon.


Really?   I always see a floppy icon.
 
2014-06-05 01:17:17 PM  
Clicker for remote control.

Flip side.
 
2014-06-05 01:21:36 PM  
Their explanation for "mind your p's and q's" is wrong (it comes from 'please' and 'thank you')
 
2014-06-05 01:34:52 PM  

DjangoStonereaver: Early in my tech support career, I was talking a complete neophyte through a procedure and told them to
type out a command and hit the Return key.

"Which one is that?"

It threw me for a moment, then when I looked at the keyboard, I saw that it had 'Enter' printed on it, not
'Return'. That is how tech unsavvy my customer was, and how complacent I had become since I'd never
actually bothered to read the keyboard of the computers I was supporting at the time.

To this day I often call it 'Enter' instead of 'Return' precisely for that reason.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enter_key

They don't always do the same thing, but for most Windows users they do.
 
2014-06-05 01:36:23 PM  

Chariset: Their explanation for "mind your p's and q's" is wrong (it comes from 'please' and 'thank you')


Yeah, I thought that seemed odd.  The admittedly-few times I've heard that expression, it always meant you should remember to be polite.  If "be alert" was ever part of it, it was in a "make sure you're minding your manners" sense.  Seems weird that would have anything to do with printing presses.
 
2014-06-05 01:45:29 PM  
Ironically the list omits the term "slideshow," which originally referred to a series of projected images from transparent squares of photographic film ("slides") but has come to refer any series of static images.
 
2014-06-05 01:48:41 PM  

Eddie Adams from Torrance: It's interesting how words slip in and even when their meaning becomes obscured by new tech, people don't give the apparent disconnect a second thought.

I've been telling my kid "Dont' forget to tape Mythbusters tomorrow' since he was about six and we've never owned a tape based recording device of any sort in his lifetime and I don't think he's ever asked 'WTF is tape?'


"Rewind" and "footage" are other terms related to physical tape/film that are still in use in the digital age.
 
2014-06-05 02:13:05 PM  

Eddie Adams from Torrance: It's interesting how words slip in and even when their meaning becomes obscured by new tech, people don't give the apparent disconnect a second thought.

I've been telling my kid "Dont' forget to tape Mythbusters tomorrow' since he was about six and we've never owned a tape based recording device of any sort in his lifetime and I don't think he's ever asked 'WTF is tape?'


It's kind of neat though, and it works with other stuff. Lexicons seem to be built out of obsolete terms whose specific meaning broads, or whose metaphorical significance has ossified into denotation.
 
2014-06-05 02:21:41 PM  

SMB2811: DjangoStonereaver: Early in my tech support career, I was talking a complete neophyte through a procedure and told them to
type out a command and hit the Return key.

"Which one is that?"

It threw me for a moment, then when I looked at the keyboard, I saw that it had 'Enter' printed on it, not
'Return'. That is how tech unsavvy my customer was, and how complacent I had become since I'd never
actually bothered to read the keyboard of the computers I was supporting at the time.

To this day I often call it 'Enter' instead of 'Return' precisely for that reason.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enter_key

They don't always do the same thing, but for most Windows users they do.


True, but this was early in the Windows 3.0 days, during the transition between straight MS-DOS and
modern, mass-market GUIs.  Almost all the older keyboards called the key Return, but like I said: the
fault ultimately lies with me for not paying attention to what the keys said.
 
2014-06-05 02:23:01 PM  
My Windows operating system uses the universal "On-Off, 1 slashed through a 0" icon for entering sleep mode.

I really appreciate Windows.
 
2014-06-05 02:35:31 PM  
"Web page"
noun
noun: web page; plural noun: web pages; noun: webpage; plural noun: webpages
a hypertext document connected to the World Wide Web.
 
2014-06-05 02:49:47 PM  
They also left off a really obvious one: scrolling
 
2014-06-05 02:51:56 PM  
I find it weird that we are still using the phrase "The pot calling the kettle black", when the vast majority of both kettles and pots in everyday use are stainless steel.
 
2014-06-05 03:26:44 PM  

Jiro Dreams Of McRibs: My Windows operating system uses the universal "On-Off, 1 slashed through a 0" icon for entering sleep mode.

I really appreciate Windows.


I remember reading years ago about the inventor of that symbology. IIRC, they are not a one and zero, but a circle and line. I remember that the guy said the circle was meant to represent a "potential for action", in that the circle could metaphorically roll in either direction, and that the vertical line represented "realized action", in that such an object would have to make an effort to remain balanced vertically. I could be misremembering, though, and semiotics isn't really my bag, so take that with a grain of salt.
 
2014-06-05 03:30:30 PM  
Now I was always told that "mind your p's and q's" referred to pints and quarts.

Someone in a bar drinking (beer most likely--pints) should pay attention to how much you have had so that 1) you had enough money to pay the tab and 2) you did not get too out of control drunk (for your safety and others).

I always associated it with the British.
 
2014-06-05 03:48:25 PM  
www.extremetech.com
 
2014-06-05 03:48:49 PM  

Last Man on Earth: Chariset: Their explanation for "mind your p's and q's" is wrong (it comes from 'please' and 'thank you')

Yeah, I thought that seemed odd.  The admittedly-few times I've heard that expression, it always meant you should remember to be polite.  If "be alert" was ever part of it, it was in a "make sure you're minding your manners" sense.  Seems weird that would have anything to do with printing presses.


I was told it was an old bar term ... mind your pints and quarts ... meaning watch how much you drink. hmm    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mind_your_Ps_and_Qs
 
2014-06-05 03:50:52 PM  
The hand gesture used on set to tell someone that recording is happening is to imitate turning the crank on a camera. It's still used today despite the fact that hand cranked cameras were rendered obsolete by sound film.
 
2014-06-05 04:06:06 PM  
I feel old, I actually knew the origin of most of them.
 
2014-06-05 04:22:41 PM  
never heard of the modern use of the terms carriage returns or radio buttons, despite knowing what they were in real life.
 
2014-06-05 04:34:25 PM  

Last Man on Earth: Chariset: Their explanation for "mind your p's and q's" is wrong (it comes from 'please' and 'thank you')

Yeah, I thought that seemed odd.  The admittedly-few times I've heard that expression, it always meant you should remember to be polite.  If "be alert" was ever part of it, it was in a "make sure you're minding your manners" sense.  Seems weird that would have anything to do with printing presses.


When it was expressed to me, it was usually in the context of being diligent, like filling out a complicated government form. I've also heard it as a way of saying "mind your manners", but the former was more common.

I still think it sounds stupid.
 
2014-06-05 04:35:08 PM  
Dang, I had that e-machines on the opening image. "World best gaming machine with the VooDoo3 gaming engine"

It connected to AOL well.
 
2014-06-05 05:35:58 PM  
CSB:  A few years ago, while watching TV live, as opposed to the much-preferred DVR method, we were forced to watch a commercial.  In the commercial, the spokesman urged us to dial 1-800 something.  My son, who was about 8, asked me why we say we are going to "dial" the phone, since he had never seen a phone with a dial in his life.  When I started with "You see, son, it used to be..." my son said nevermind.
 
2014-06-05 05:41:40 PM  
Slide show.  A sequential presentation of images on color photographic film usually in compressed paper or plastic holders shown via a projector to convey information.

Seriously how did they miss that one?
 
2014-06-05 05:49:32 PM  

XMark: I find it weird that we are still using the phrase "The pot calling the kettle black", when the vast majority of both kettles and pots in everyday use are stainless steel.


Oooooo........that just steams me.
 
2014-06-05 06:34:56 PM  

Eddie Adams from Torrance: It's interesting how words slip in and even when their meaning becomes obscured by new tech, people don't give the apparent disconnect a second thought.

I've been telling my kid "Dont' forget to tape Mythbusters tomorrow' since he was about six and we've never owned a tape based recording device of any sort in his lifetime and I don't think he's ever asked 'WTF is tape?'


My kid would immediately question that, but he's was born a Grammar Nazi.
 
2014-06-05 07:02:05 PM  

bigwill64: I was told it was an old bar term ... mind your pints and quarts ... meaning watch how much you drink. hmm    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mind_your_Ps_and_Qs


No matter where it came from, I'm betting the printing industry was where it spread.


buckler: I remember reading years ago about the inventor of that symbology. IIRC, they are not a one and zero, but a circle and line. I remember that the guy said the circle was meant to represent a "potential for action", in that the circle could metaphorically roll in either direction, and that the vertical line represented "realized action", in that such an object would have to make an effort to remain balanced vertically. I could be misremembering, though, and semiotics isn't really my bag, so take that with a grain of salt.


The binary 1/0 switches for on/off were available in electronic catalogs long before that story was started.  I've seen gear that was made in the 1950s that used it.
 
2014-06-05 08:31:46 PM  
Some people still use the verbs "film", "filming", "tape", or "taping" when referring to recording a moving image with a digital camera.

With the inevitable coming of the driver-less car, the expression "putting the petal to the metal" will someday become meaningless.
 
2014-06-05 09:33:08 PM  

LeroyB: Some people still use the verbs "film", "filming", "tape", or "taping" when referring to recording a moving image with a digital camera.

With the inevitable coming of the driver-less car, the expression "putting the petal pedal to the metal" will someday become meaningless.


FTFY
 
2014-06-05 10:30:05 PM  

LeroyB: With the inevitable coming of the driver-less car, the expression "putting the petal to the metal" will someday become meaningless.


HotRodder:  Can you make my car go faster?
Hacker: I put the pedal to the metal and make the GPS think the car is going too slow and then break the back up safety system and then it will go like a rocket sled on rails.
 
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