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(Health.com)   Scientists erase, then restore memories in rats. After all, who wants a rat that can't remember eating cheese, spreading filth and disease?   (news.health.com) divider line 26
    More: Interesting, rats, memory, amyloids, chemical processes, nerves, neurons, optics, postdoctoral researcher  
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323 clicks; posted to Geek » on 04 Jun 2014 at 9:30 AM (46 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



26 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-06-04 08:41:16 AM  
Erase memories: alcohol

Restore memories: remove alcohol
 
2014-06-04 08:58:59 AM  
We all know where this is headed...

img.fark.net


That's right...women with three boobs.
 
2014-06-04 09:00:45 AM  
That rat looks a lot like Ben Affleck for some reason
 
2014-06-04 09:47:34 AM  

gopher321: Erase memories: alcohol

Restore memories: remove alcohol


Modern neurology, according to a very recent fark article, alleges blackouts don't work that way.
 
2014-06-04 09:53:31 AM  
Don't modern rats just use the cloud?
 
2014-06-04 09:57:26 AM  

UberDave: We all know where this is headed...

[img.fark.net image 620x375]


That's right...women with three boobs.


img1.wikia.nocookie.net
That's right...flashlight dildos.
 
2014-06-04 10:10:31 AM  
Did the rat still fell in love with the same rat?
 
2014-06-04 10:11:13 AM  
So they stripped their inner skull liner and read the newspaper?
 
2014-06-04 10:17:08 AM  
And now thinking of what that must think like, I thought of rick roll asking where was dr..dre/jonbenet, what was really arnold shwartzi~ asking for pot because his time travel machine was abducted by predators, and lost his tank in some bushes at the same time.
 
2014-06-04 10:19:33 AM  
it was through some sort of shocking holographic PSA bulletin.
 
Skr
2014-06-04 11:00:21 AM  
"light optics to stimulate"
I'm guessing that in the future, some variation of this tech will be used for advertising. Implanting the craving and taste of some food or the strong desire and need for some product... with an added tactic of erasing memories of the competition.
 
2014-06-04 11:11:48 AM  

Skr: "light optics to stimulate"
I'm guessing that in the future, some variation of this tech will be used for advertising. Implanting the craving and taste of some food or the strong desire and need for some product... with an added tactic of erasing memories of the competition.


Doubt it, it will all be windmill/solar powered vacuum tube packet-traffics, you go for anything and everything is the same brand.
 
2014-06-04 11:14:09 AM  
the brand awareness will the the experience, and you'd have your own for whatever particular version you'd want to feel at the moment.
 
2014-06-04 11:20:05 AM  
Called it
:img.fark.net
 
2014-06-04 11:20:17 AM  
Snark aside, this is actually interesting. It appears that the nerve bundle acts similarly to a capacitor based electronic hi-pass signal filter. The low frequency pulses were able to "reset" the bundle by blocking out the stimulus, but the high frequency pulses activated the "circuit" which reactivated the response.

While it doesn't point to mind control in my eyes, (You need to genetically modify a creature to get this work), I do like the implications this could have on light based or even terahertz frequency electronic circuits, because we now know how nerve bundles react.
 
2014-06-04 11:45:50 AM  

Boojum2k: Called it
:[img.fark.net image 600x300]


Called it sooner

img.fark.net
 
2014-06-04 11:53:47 AM  

praxcelis: Boojum2k: Called it
:[img.fark.net image 600x300]

Called it sooner

[img.fark.net image 225x168]


It's been forever since I read any Spider Robinson, did he actually use a light-based memory erasing technology? Because the one in Night's Dawn is.
 
2014-06-04 12:45:24 PM  

Naesen: Snark aside, this is actually interesting. It appears that the nerve bundle acts similarly to a capacitor based electronic hi-pass signal filter. The low frequency pulses were able to "reset" the bundle by blocking out the stimulus, but the high frequency pulses activated the "circuit" which reactivated the response.

While it doesn't point to mind control in my eyes, (You need to genetically modify a creature to get this work), I do like the implications this could have on light based or even terahertz frequency electronic circuits, because we now know how nerve bundles react.


Sounds more like a data bottleneck, and humans seem to know a good deal about those.
 
2014-06-04 01:12:32 PM  

Naesen: While it doesn't point to mind control in my eyes,


It doesn't equal mind control because despite the heavy breathing in the press they didn't wipe a "memory." The so-called memory they wiped is a memory in the same sense that a person has "muscle memory" not in the sense of "I remember being kissed by mom at age three". What they did--properly speaking--was undo a conditioned response simply by flashing lights. That is interesting but more for its implication for concepts like "learned helplessness" than for anything to do with memories.

It's also interesting for its implications with virtual reality. Simulation sickness is a big problem in virtual reality and experiments in that field have also shown that how much sickness a person experiences has a lot to do with the frequency of light. It may be the the way the human mind processes and stores information is based on light frequency in the same way that a bee's mind does with light polarization.
 
2014-06-04 02:50:31 PM  
global3.memecdn.com
 
2014-06-04 03:15:31 PM  
Still no cure for rat farts.
 
2014-06-04 03:18:42 PM  
worlddan: It may be the the way the human mind processes and stores information is based on light frequency in the same way that a bee's mind does with light polarization.

We are probably some kind of motor-neuron control freaks, so I don't exactly think that would be the correct and simplest answr.

There are probably modes, lodes loads and road grooves at least in my minds idea of itself inverted on a screen elsewhere. We probably have 'memory group-category-sets' that zipline things and provide the defining line between luck, freewill and motion inresponsive to fight or flight.
 
2014-06-04 04:24:50 PM  

Boojum2k: praxcelis: Boojum2k: Called it
:[img.fark.net image 600x300]

Called it sooner

[img.fark.net image 225x168]

It's been forever since I read any Spider Robinson, did he actually use a light-based memory erasing technology? Because the one in Night's Dawn is.


I think it was some sort of induction, but there was a scene early in Mindkiller where someone making a competing product uses light.  I'll have to go back and look.  The whole first book is about the discovery of this technology and the implications on society.  It's an excellent read and the best of the three.
 
2014-06-04 07:45:56 PM  

Skr: "light optics to stimulate"
I'm guessing that in the future, some variation of this tech will be used for advertising. Implanting the craving and taste of some food or the strong desire and need for some product... with an added tactic of erasing memories of the competition.


There's a ted talk about the subject that explains the mechanics quite well.  In short, no.

worlddan: What they did--properly speaking--was undo a conditioned response simply by flashing lights.


Still no.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EXo3qA9V3eI

That's the TED talk, breaks it down much better than this "science" article.
 
2014-06-05 10:37:19 AM  
It's a pretty shiat article.

They flashed a bright light at a rat and shocked it at the same time.

They were then impressed the rat continued to react to flashes of light after the shocks were removed (you know, because it now has memories of trauma.)

Then, when they flash lights at the rat long enough it gets over its trauma, they discover they can re-traumatize it with a single bright flash of light, and fark up the rat all over again.

/I'm pretty sure I can do this with a human without any memory manipulation at all.
 
2014-06-05 05:08:49 PM  

fluffy2097: They flashed a bright light at a rat and shocked it at the same time.


/le sigh
//still

They're not flashing lights at the rats(ie for their visual input), they're stimulating neurons(which previously were altered to react to the light) directly, within the brain, via an implanted laser head.(more like inserted as a lot of it sticks out and is attached to wires, they show it in my video link above)

Or something akin to that at any rate, it's not like they're doing an amateur rave by flicking the light switch on and off for the rats to see.
 
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