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(TreeHugger)   Bathrooms are the most expensive rooms in the house, do you really need three?   (treehugger.com) divider line 172
    More: Unlikely, Kohler  
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4928 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Jun 2014 at 8:35 AM (42 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



172 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-06-04 03:01:26 AM  
If bathrooms are the most expensive in the house then someone can't do math.  Add up the price of the refrigerator, the stove, the microwave, the cabinets, the vent over the stove, and someone failed basic math in the 7th grade as compared to a sink, a toilet and a bath/shower.
 
2014-06-04 03:29:53 AM  
One off the living room (for guests). One connected to the master bedroom. One for general use at the other end of the upstairs hall.

That's the bare minimum, unless you live in a studio apartment the size of a shoebox.

You'd also want one in the garage, if possible. And one connected to the guest bedroom for their privacy.

So 5 bathrooms are needed as a minimum for a typical home. I'm not sure why anyone's trying to insinuate that having three is somehow wasteful.
 
2014-06-04 04:45:12 AM  

Trailltrader: If bathrooms are the most expensive in the house then someone can't do math.


If your bathroom ISN'T the most expensive room in the house, you're doing it wrong.

4.bp.blogspot.com

You see that? Those are diamonds.
 
2014-06-04 04:55:42 AM  

doglover: Trailltrader: If bathrooms are the most expensive in the house then someone can't do math.

If your bathroom ISN'T the most expensive room in the house, you're doing it wrong.

[4.bp.blogspot.com image 450x566]

You see that? Those are diamonds.


Tywin Lannister is derisively said to shiat gold by his detractors. Whether he does or doesn't, I still want a toilet he'd be willing to use. Any old fire will cook food, and a fridge just has to be cold, but a toilet is a man's throne.
 
2014-06-04 06:47:23 AM  
My feces requires a luxurious resting place.
 
2014-06-04 07:02:26 AM  
Sometimes, there are people in your household (whom you can't kick out due to blood or something) that you do NOT want to share a bathroom with. That alone makes it worth it....

/shivers
 
2014-06-04 07:10:24 AM  
Subby obviously doesnt have 3 daughters.  You don't want them anywhere near your throne.
 
2014-06-04 07:24:01 AM  
Master bath, everyone else, and a half bath in a convenient location?  That seems pretty reasonable to me.  My wife and I share one and sometimes that causes problems if we had kids there is no way in hell I would want to only have one and if we lived in a house there is no way I want guests traipsing upstairs to use either my sanctum or my kids bathroom.
 
2014-06-04 07:30:56 AM  
One bathroom and a random toilet in the middle of an unfinished basement is more than acceptable.
 
2014-06-04 07:50:08 AM  
My anus armory is worth every damn penny, dookmitter.
 
2014-06-04 07:59:14 AM  

Doctor Funkenstein: My anus armory.


almostnerdy.com
 
2014-06-04 08:14:41 AM  

Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: One bathroom and a random toilet in the middle of an unfinished basement is more than acceptable.


The house we bought three years ago has one full bathroom upstairs and nothing on the main floor. In the basement is a newly built 3/4 bath and around the corner from that is a room with just a toilet. We still can't figure out why they left that literal toilet room there and we have it stacked full of boxes like that episode of Malcolm in the Middle.

GIS for secret bathroom is interesting:
30.media.tumblr.com
static.wixstatic.com
legacy-cdn.smosh.com
 
2014-06-04 08:15:23 AM  

Egoy3k: Master bath, everyone else, and a half bath in a convenient location?  That seems pretty reasonable to me.


For a family, that's pretty reasonable. And a bathroom doesn't have to be that expensive, people have just gone absolutely nuts with finishings lately. I just want to take a shiat, not feel like I walked into a spa.
 
2014-06-04 08:18:25 AM  
 
2014-06-04 08:33:21 AM  
Bathrooms in the house?
When did they start doing that?
 
2014-06-04 08:42:08 AM  
More bedrooms and more bathrooms tends to mean the place is intended for roommates/multiple families, not a single family.  The current place I'm renting now has a bedroom/bathroom layout that only makes sense for roommates who may not want to share bathrooms.  For a single family it's a bit nuts.
 
2014-06-04 08:43:36 AM  
We just moved into a new apartment and the bathrooms are carpeted. I don't farking get it.
 
2014-06-04 08:44:06 AM  
"Need" is a big word.  Does anyone really need a dishwasher?  Or a garage?
 
2014-06-04 08:45:24 AM  
The real question is how many maids per bathroom.  Someone has to keep it shiny
 
2014-06-04 08:46:14 AM  
Does a window count as a toilet?
 
2014-06-04 08:46:54 AM  
How many bathrooms should there be in a family house?

One.

Although a second toilet could be useful.
 
2014-06-04 08:47:12 AM  
One communal bath house per block for shiats and showers. Used milk jugs when you need to piss.
 
hej
2014-06-04 08:47:38 AM  

Crudbucket: We just moved into a new apartment and the bathrooms are carpeted. I don't farking get it.


It helps insure all the stray urine sprinkles get extra fermented over time.
 
2014-06-04 08:47:42 AM  
Expensive maybe, but when you consider my shower has room for six people, it's more like a party room.
 
2014-06-04 08:50:43 AM  
Two full bathrooms upstairs where the bedrooms are: One for the wife and I.  One for the kids.
One half bath downstairs: for use by everyone during the day.

Bathrooms are typically the smallest rooms in the house anyway so having three seems reasonable to me.
 
2014-06-04 08:50:44 AM  

Trailltrader: If bathrooms are the most expensive in the house then someone can't do math.  Add up the price of the refrigerator, the stove, the microwave, the cabinets, the vent over the stove, and someone failed basic math in the 7th grade as compared to a sink, a toilet and a bath/shower.


A bathroom is more expensive from a plumbing perspective - you have the sink, terlet, and bath/shower, each with its own supply and drain. The kitchen has the sink supply and drain, a tap from the sink to the dishwasher, and maybe a supply tap to the refrigerator.

From an overall cost point, I still think you're completely right though - nothing in the kitchen is cheap, and it's a bigger room than the bathroom (more flooring, more cabinets, etc.)

For me, I have just one kitchen and two full baths (one upstairs, one down), plus a big back yard. I wouldn't buy a house with only one terlet, even though I live alone 5 days a week - the bit of added cost to have an alternate / back up is well worth it.
 
2014-06-04 08:52:30 AM  

EvilEgg: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2572782/You-need-sit-The-10-0 0 0-heated-toilet-does-away-toilet-paper.html


I like to poop in style


Looks like it's talking:

i.dailymail.co.uk

Feed me, Seymour (Butts)!
 
2014-06-04 08:53:08 AM  
The closer you are to a toilet, the more successful you are
 
2014-06-04 08:54:09 AM  
Was watching one of those "flip this house and make a fortune" shows the other night (thought they died with the housing crash but apparently we back to party time!)

Anyway, the dude is complaining he needs to spend $4k to replace the roof.  10 seconds later they're talking about spending almost $2k on the door to the shower... the door...

/bathrooms got nothing on kitchens for a place to set large piles of money on fire.
 
2014-06-04 08:54:34 AM  
Everytime Subby's mom takes a shiat, she clogs two toilets... so, Yes!
 
2014-06-04 08:55:25 AM  

Crudbucket: We just moved into a new apartment and the bathrooms are carpeted. I don't farking get it.


BARF BARF BARF BARF BARF

When we bought our first house the powder room was carpeted, and the toilet sprang a leak.

BARF BARF BARF

We are moving into a gutted and redone 1910 townhouse. One major upgrade - there are now two full bathrooms on the second floor. Sure, you could make it work without that, but it's a lot easier with it.
 
2014-06-04 08:56:04 AM  
The neighbors backyard is free!
 
2014-06-04 08:56:22 AM  

FraglitsStignow: The closer you are to a toilet, the more successful you are


I'm sure the guy in NY or SF living in a $2000/mo half bed/half bath studio with a toilet next to his pillow agrees with you.
 
2014-06-04 08:57:41 AM  
Our house was built in 1929 and has a single bathroom for me, my wife and our 3 kids. We thought about putting in another one, but we don't want to steal any of our living space away. It's rarely a big deal. It'd occasionally be nice to have another toilet since our teenage daughter apparently thinks that a short shower is roughly two years long, but other than that, it's really not a big deal.

What people fail to understand is that the more bathrooms you have, the more bathrooms you have to clean. Unless you're one of the 1% who can hire someone to do it for you, five bathrooms is a heck of a lot of toilet scrubbing to do every week. Our last house was a two bathroom affair and it was a serious pain to have to clean them both every week.
 
2014-06-04 08:57:45 AM  
My master bedroom has two bathrooms... his and hers. Best money I've ever spent.
 
2014-06-04 08:57:46 AM  

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: Egoy3k: Master bath, everyone else, and a half bath in a convenient location?  That seems pretty reasonable to me.

For a family, that's pretty reasonable. And a bathroom doesn't have to be that expensive, people have just gone absolutely nuts with finishings lately. I just want to take a shiat, not feel like I walked into a spa.


That's exactly what my better half had in mind when we had two new bathrooms renovated.  Let's just say for the cost of that project, I could have bought an Audi S6.  Instead, I now sit on the spa-like toilet and play Real Racing 3 on my iPhone.
 
2014-06-04 08:59:17 AM  
Unless you live alone I think you need at least two full baths, but two terlets is a must for multiple people.  If everybody gets a stomach virus at the same time I don't even know how you could handle that situation with one.
 
2014-06-04 08:59:21 AM  
The laundry sink in the basement counts as a urinal, right?
 
2014-06-04 09:00:00 AM  

hej: Crudbucket: We just moved into a new apartment and the bathrooms are carpeted. I don't farking get it.

It helps insure all the stray urine sprinkles get extra fermented over time.


Buy, don't rent a carpet cleaner.  I have two boys who are not entirely accurate yet.
 
2014-06-04 09:00:14 AM  
We have one bathroom (for 6 people) and I hate it.  It was especially horrible a couple of weeks ago when we were dealing with a stomach bug.  There was literally a line a few times.

My favorite house layout so far has been a half-bath downstairs, full bath in the hallway upstairs, and half bath en suite to the master bedroom.  I'm happy with scheduling shower times, but you use the toilet much more often.
 
2014-06-04 09:01:46 AM  
1 bathroom here, 3 bedroom, family of 4 never an issue. May add a 1/2 bath but I'm in no rush.

100 year old house, trying to find the right look and fixtures for one room is hard enough. If I do anything modern it's usually in the basement which is where an additional bath would be.

I have a large garage and thats all I needed.
 
2014-06-04 09:01:49 AM  

SecretAgentWoman: Sometimes, there are people in your household (whom you can't kick out due to blood or something) that you do NOT want to share a bathroom with. That alone makes it worth it....

/shivers


I know that feeling. My parents have it in spades and i'm desperatly trying to get out of the house for their sake.

/ok, my sake too
 
2014-06-04 09:01:52 AM  
This FA is wrong in just about every way.  My house was build in 1978.  It is just your standard home and it has four bedrooms and 2.5 baths.  The bathroom IS NOT the most expensive room in a house.  The kitchen cost far more.
 
2014-06-04 09:02:55 AM  
Anybody with teens knows why you must have at least 3 bathrooms, and a backyard. We have all of the above, and are still trying to afford to put another half bath (at a minimum) in the basement.
 
2014-06-04 09:02:57 AM  
The kitchen is by far the most expensive room.  And I need a minimum of two full ones, so obviously two people can do their stuff at the same time, including getting dressed.  Also, I won't share a bathroom with my ole lady, and she has no desire to follow after me.  A third half-bath is great for guests, especially when entertaining.  So do I NEED 2.5?  No, but that extra half bath is pretty damn cheap actually, takes up almost no space, and adds to resale value.
 
2014-06-04 09:03:09 AM  
3 bathrooms, 3 people in our house...
And it still isn't enough bathrooms.
Guests come over...12 year old daughter has sleepovers.
Would love another couple available...
Who's this tree-hugger telling me I shouldn't have lots of bathrooms?
 
2014-06-04 09:03:35 AM  
I'd normally prefer two bathrooms but luckily my wife and daughter are not the endless-primping sort of girls so the four of us make do with one okay.

My son and I could do with one of these, though...a proper floor-to-shoulder gigantic robber-baron urinal with plenty of space on top to rest your pint or whisky-glass

www.blogcdn.com
 
2014-06-04 09:03:56 AM  
Oh and to add to my previous. I personally believe that a 6 car garage is more beneficial than 3 bathrooms so take that.
 
2014-06-04 09:04:49 AM  

Gulper Eel: I'd normally prefer two bathrooms but luckily my wife and daughter are not the endless-primping sort of girls so the four of us make do with one okay.

My son and I could do with one of these, though...a proper floor-to-shoulder gigantic robber-baron urinal with plenty of space on top to rest your pint or whisky-glass

[www.blogcdn.com image 294x456]


I don't even need that, I piss in the yard approximately 87% of the time
 
2014-06-04 09:07:05 AM  

Gulper Eel: I'd normally prefer two bathrooms but luckily my wife and daughter are not the endless-primping sort of girls so the four of us make do with one okay.

My son and I could do with one of these, though...a proper floor-to-shoulder gigantic robber-baron urinal with plenty of space on top to rest your pint or whisky-glass

[www.blogcdn.com image 294x456]


Yep necessary for the garage, would like a floor reaching one though use a waterless now.
 
2014-06-04 09:07:23 AM  
The article doesn't quantify how bathrooms are "the most expensive room in the house" Cost of construction? Maintenance/upkeep, water?  I don't get it - as someone pointed out, the kitchen is WAY more expensive.  At any rate, I suppose the "tree hugger" author is probably a "if it's yellow let it mellow" type - I knew one of those once - freakin GROSS.

I found the linked account of 43% of new home buyers using cash more intriguing.
 
2014-06-04 09:09:47 AM  
FTA: " Danielle points out that most of the people buying houses in the States are doing it with cash, so we are talking mostly about the 1% driving the single family house market these days..."


Forget the bathrooms, that statement warrants an article by itself.
 
2014-06-04 09:13:39 AM  
Bathrooms more expensive than kitchens? I guess if you tried hard enough you could spend a lot on them but a kitchen will really grab hold of your wallet.
 
2014-06-04 09:14:05 AM  
Well, having a stupid system where practically everyone in society goes to work at the same time means everyone in the house needs to use a bathroom during the same small window of time.
 
2014-06-04 09:14:26 AM  
I guess you need extra toilets too if you're breeding spastic dorks that have to be strapped in to do their business.
i.imgur.com
 
2014-06-04 09:15:46 AM  
Growing up in a house with 4 kids, 2 parents, and one invalid grandmother and having only 1.5 bathrooms, yes, three bathrooms ARE needed.

Since I moved out on my own, I have had at least 2 bathrooms.  I don't need 2 bathrooms for myself, but one for when I have family over and one for myself.  I never want to have to wait in line for a toilet again.

Some luxuries don't have a price.
 
2014-06-04 09:17:03 AM  

AverageAmericanGuy: One off the living room (for guests). One connected to the master bedroom. One for general use at the other end of the upstairs hall.

That's the bare minimum, unless you live in a studio apartment the size of a shoebox.

You'd also want one in the garage, if possible. And one connected to the guest bedroom for their privacy.

So 5 bathrooms are needed as a minimum for a typical home. I'm not sure why anyone's trying to insinuate that having three is somehow wasteful.


I am not sure why anyone is trying to dictate how many bathrooms somebody should be allowed to have.
 
2014-06-04 09:17:11 AM  
The article claims it's the 1% driving things but personally I'd say it's poverty. How many people are splitting houses instead of apartments now because it's all they can afford? You get one couple per bedroom in a 3/4 bedroom house and you're going to need more than one bathroom.

All you need is more than 3 people to catch diahrrea in a house with one toilet and I guarantee you someone's shiatting in the sink.
 
2014-06-04 09:17:27 AM  

sethen320: FTA: " Danielle points out that most of the people buying houses in the States are doing it with cash, so we are talking mostly about the 1% driving the single family house market these days..."


Forget the bathrooms, that statement warrants an article by itself.


Ya I've noticed a lot of homes selling in my neighborhood that are immediately used for renters...not home owners.

I don't know, I kinda find that whole thing distasteful.  Just makes prices rise and prevents actual people from wanting to become home owners from doing so, while the rich get richer as they basically make money from every house they are currently screwing people over with.

2 FB 1 HB.  One bathroom upstairs, half bath near the living room, and another full in the basement for guests.
 
2014-06-04 09:19:39 AM  
Most expensive room in the house is subjective based on what you do.

Kitchen, can be done cheaply with $200 appliances or for 10s of thousands with the right stuff.

Living room, if thats your entertainment space the dollars can add up rapidly

Foyer, again dressed out can be costly

Garage, can equal the cost of the house if you are a car collector / mechanic

Bathroom, it can get up there but third in line from my view.

For me, the cheapest rooms in the house are bedrooms.

Here is my personal ranking from most expensive to cheapest.

Garage
Kitchen

Living Room
Bathroom
Foyer
Bedrooms
Pantry
 
2014-06-04 09:21:25 AM  
My takeaway is that the amount of bathrooms you need seems to be dependent on the number of people who live in your house and the frequency with which you have guests.
My wife and I have a house built in the '30's with 2.3 bathrooms. We each get our own, and the .3 bathroom is the for the cats.

/it's just a toilet in the basement with a stall around it.
 
2014-06-04 09:21:50 AM  

Shadowe: The article claims it's the 1% driving things but personally I'd say it's poverty. How many people are splitting houses instead of apartments now because it's all they can afford? You get one couple per bedroom in a 3/4 bedroom house and you're going to need more than one bathroom.

All you need is more than 3 people to catch diahrrea in a house with one toilet and I guarantee you someone's shiatting in the sink.


No, I really think its a case of people buying out tons of homes and renting them out.  Like I said, out of my neighborhood of 30 something homes, at least 50% or more are renters, and a lot of the houses have been sold recently and then become rental properties.

You know why I was able to buy my home there?

Because we found out there was nearly 10 grand in repairs needed to all the pipes in the house immediately after we bought it and I learned everytime I took a crap (which is often due to my Crohn's) it was kicking back up into my basement.  And every shower leaked into the walls.

Basically the house was only sold because the asshole previous owner didn't want to do maintenance.
 
2014-06-04 09:27:39 AM  
As a contractor specializing in bathrooms, I will say that yes, absolutely you need three.  Five if you can find the space.
 
2014-06-04 09:27:48 AM  

Shadowe: The article claims it's the 1% driving things but personally I'd say it's poverty. How many people are splitting houses instead of apartments now because it's all they can afford? You get one couple per bedroom in a 3/4 bedroom house and you're going to need more than one bathroom.

All you need is more than 3 people to catch diahrrea in a house with one toilet and I guarantee you someone's shiatting in the sink.

skiboshspauldingadventures.com
Somehow that reminded me of the bathrooms at the brewhauses in Germany.  They figure that one out.  You could dump a bucket of golf balls in the sink and it wouldn't plug.
 
2014-06-04 09:29:31 AM  
We only have one bathroom for my wife and I and our two boys.  It's definitely not enough.  Most days it works fine since our kids our still young and my wife and I don't get ready for work at the same time.  We remodeled it last year, though, and doing that to the only bathroom in the house was not an easy project.  I had to wait until the wife and kids were out of town for a week.  I was peeing in the back yard and visiting the library down the street much more frequently than normal that week.
 
2014-06-04 09:29:36 AM  
Depends on what you mean by "need".

I am the sixth of seven children in my family.  Three boys, four girls.  Two parents, male and female.  For a six year stretch all nine of us were in one house, plus my geriatric maternal Grandmother.

Did we "need" three bathrooms?  I don't know.  But it sure seemed like three wasn't enough a lot of the time!
 
2014-06-04 09:29:39 AM  

Hagbardr: One communal bath house per block for shiats and showers. Used milk jugs when you need to piss.


i.imgur.com
 
2014-06-04 09:29:43 AM  

doglover: doglover: Trailltrader: If bathrooms are the most expensive in the house then someone can't do math.

If your bathroom ISN'T the most expensive room in the house, you're doing it wrong.

[4.bp.blogspot.com image 450x566]

You see that? Those are diamonds.

Tywin Lannister is derisively said to shiat gold by his detractors. Whether he does or doesn't, I still want a toilet he'd be willing to use. Any old fire will cook food, and a fridge just has to be cold, but a toilet is a man's throne.


So you want a metal toilet with random edges and points sticking out that cut you when you sit on it?
 
2014-06-04 09:30:35 AM  
img.fark.net

Which is why if you live with a woman, you need at least two bathrooms.
 
2014-06-04 09:30:56 AM  

Thank You Black Jesus!: As a contractor specializing in bathrooms, I will say that yes, absolutely you need three.  Five if you can find the space.


Not that you have a personal stake in that...
 
2014-06-04 09:32:42 AM  
How many bathrooms did the Brady's have?

Really, how many?  Didn't all 6 kids share a bathroom?

There were 9 people in that house.  I'm assuming there was a master bathroom and hopefully Alice had her own too, but did they ever use those bathrooms?

RIP Anne B. Davis.
 
2014-06-04 09:34:13 AM  

Trailltrader: If bathrooms are the most expensive in the house then someone can't do math.  Add up the price of the refrigerator, the stove, the microwave, the cabinets, the vent over the stove, and someone failed basic math in the 7th grade as compared to a sink, a toilet and a bath/shower.


This.....also "Yes" I farking do need three
 
2014-06-04 09:36:07 AM  
Maybe most expensive *per square foot*?
 
2014-06-04 09:40:22 AM  

Gulper Eel: My son and I could do with one of these, though...a proper floor-to-shoulder gigantic robber-baron urinal with plenty of space on top to rest your pint or whisky-glass


I have a friend with one of those in the garage, behind a pair of louvered doors. Next to the Porsche and whatever his current luxury sedan is. I think the place has at least 3 full baths.
 
2014-06-04 09:41:50 AM  
By the time I'm done with my luxury master bath remodel, it will be the most expensive room in the house. Doing it myself, so I'm saving thousands. Even then, it's gonna be north of $10K. Would probably have been 25-30K if I'd hired a pro.
 
2014-06-04 09:47:25 AM  

Crudbucket: We just moved into a new apartment and the bathrooms are carpeted. I don't farking get it.


It is easier to lay down cheap carpet than replace ugly tile.

My girlfriend lived with her parents in a house that had carpet in the kitchen.
 
2014-06-04 09:49:12 AM  
Having 4 kitchens is really expensive, but you really need them with sleepovers, 3 daughters, dogs and cats.
 
2014-06-04 09:49:53 AM  

hasty ambush: AverageAmericanGuy: One off the living room (for guests). One connected to the master bedroom. One for general use at the other end of the upstairs hall.

That's the bare minimum, unless you live in a studio apartment the size of a shoebox.

You'd also want one in the garage, if possible. And one connected to the guest bedroom for their privacy.

So 5 bathrooms are needed as a minimum for a typical home. I'm not sure why anyone's trying to insinuate that having three is somehow wasteful.

I am not sure why anyone is trying to dictate how many bathrooms somebody should be allowed to have.


I'm sure someone will come up with a way to tax your excessive bathrooms.  If they can tax you for the rain that falls on your roof (Maryland) then a Tinkle Tax is not out of the question.
 
2014-06-04 09:52:30 AM  

Nutsac_Jim: hasty ambush: AverageAmericanGuy: One off the living room (for guests). One connected to the master bedroom. One for general use at the other end of the upstairs hall.

That's the bare minimum, unless you live in a studio apartment the size of a shoebox.

You'd also want one in the garage, if possible. And one connected to the guest bedroom for their privacy.

So 5 bathrooms are needed as a minimum for a typical home. I'm not sure why anyone's trying to insinuate that having three is somehow wasteful.

I am not sure why anyone is trying to dictate how many bathrooms somebody should be allowed to have.

I'm sure someone will come up with a way to tax your excessive bathrooms.  If they can tax you for the rain that falls on your roof (Maryland) then a Tinkle Tax is not out of the question.


Bathrooms do change assessments, at least here in Michigan.
 
2014-06-04 09:52:55 AM  
Replaced the downstairs toilet last month. Didn't need to, wife wanted it replaced. we have one half bath next to the guest bedroom downstairs, ife and I have one at the master bedroom, son has one outside his room. I figure, we have 3 toilets, 3 people in the house. makes sense to me. Probably just me.
 
2014-06-04 09:53:10 AM  
Just my wife and me. Two bathrooms. Bliss.
 
2014-06-04 09:53:41 AM  

valkore: EvilEgg: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2572782/You-need-sit-The-10-0 0 0-heated-toilet-does-away-toilet-paper.html


I like to poop in style

Looks like it's talking:

[i.dailymail.co.uk image 636x358]

Feed me, Seymour (Butts)!


25.media.tumblr.com
 
2014-06-04 09:56:51 AM  

Prank Call of Cthulhu: The laundry sink in the basement counts as a urinal, right?


No.  But the floor drains are fair game.
 
2014-06-04 09:59:11 AM  
This is one of the rare times when I believe I would find a mommy blogger to have a more enlightened and realistic view on the topic than an "expert".
 
2014-06-04 10:03:40 AM  
We have too many damn bathrooms in the house we bought. Master bath off our master bed room, half bath in the hall off the kitchen for guests. Full bath upstairs, and a full bath in between the kids room and guest bedroom.. So 3 1/2. But it's technically a 5 bed room home (4 + office).
 
2014-06-04 10:10:48 AM  

gfid: How many bathrooms did the Brady's have?

Really, how many?  Didn't all 6 kids share a bathroom?

There were 9 people in that house.  I'm assuming there was a master bathroom and hopefully Alice had her own too, but did they ever use those bathrooms?

RIP Anne B. Davis.


The kids had a Jack and Jill bathroom..

2.bp.blogspot.com
 
WGJ
2014-06-04 10:13:46 AM  
It just ain't right for a man to shiat inside his own house.
 
2014-06-04 10:17:58 AM  

senoy: It'd occasionally be nice to have another toilet since our teenage daughter apparently thinks that a short shower is roughly two years long, but other than that, it's really not a big deal.


Low flow shower heads that point straight down and can't be angled work well for shortening teenager showers.

Hint: It's not about cleanliness.
 
2014-06-04 10:18:26 AM  

adm_crunch: By the time I'm done with my luxury master bath remodel, it will be the most expensive room in the house. Doing it myself, so I'm saving thousands. Even then, it's gonna be north of $10K. Would probably have been 25-30K if I'd hired a pro.


Wait until you do the kitchen. $10k is what I spent on the granite counters. Don't get me started on the cabinets and appliances.
 
2014-06-04 10:23:14 AM  

senoy: Our house was built in 1929 and has a single bathroom for me, my wife and our 3 kids. We thought about putting in another one, but we don't want to steal any of our living space away. It's rarely a big deal. It'd occasionally be nice to have another toilet since our teenage daughter apparently thinks that a short shower is roughly two years long, but other than that, it's really not a big deal.

What people fail to understand is that the more bathrooms you have, the more bathrooms you have to clean. Unless you're one of the 1% who can hire someone to do it for you, five bathrooms is a heck of a lot of toilet scrubbing to do every week. Our last house was a two bathroom affair and it was a serious pain to have to clean them both every week.


You have a teenage daughter!  What's all this talk about "hiring" someone to clean the bathrooms?
 
2014-06-04 10:24:07 AM  

EvilEgg: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2572782/You-need-sit-The-10-0 0 0-heated-toilet-does-away-toilet-paper.html


I like to poop in style


I think they're missing the point when they say you don't need toilet paper.  Water spray is supposed to be used in combination with toilet paper, not replacing it.  If you changed the oil in your car, and got oil, grease, and dirt all over your hands, would you just wipe off your hands with a dry paper towel? NO!  You'd use some water.  Maybe some soap too.  Only then would you use the paper towel.  Why do we treat assholes differently?  Dry paper only is pretty gross.
 
2014-06-04 10:24:39 AM  
I'm taking notes. Our two bathrooms are at least 30 years past their useful life. The grout is disintegrating, the pipes are failing, and in general lots of stuff I won't be able to afford to fix :/
 
2014-06-04 10:29:17 AM  

Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: One bathroom and a random toilet in the middle of an unfinished basement is more than acceptable.


I've got one of those!
 
2014-06-04 10:34:00 AM  
Those "3" bathrooms are really just 1 bathroom plus eight 0.25 sinks (0.25 bathroom).

Hrm, that is a flaw in the way the number of bathrooms is calculated.  They should do it like this:

sink ("S")= 1
sink + toliet ('"ST") = 3
shower + sink + toliet ("SST")= 5
full bath + sink + toliet ("FST") = 7


Hrm, then an FST + SST = 4 * ST .  Probably should increase the range of those numbers.
 
2014-06-04 10:36:17 AM  

Yellow Beard: adm_crunch: By the time I'm done with my luxury master bath remodel, it will be the most expensive room in the house. Doing it myself, so I'm saving thousands. Even then, it's gonna be north of $10K. Would probably have been 25-30K if I'd hired a pro.

Wait until you do the kitchen. $10k is what I spent on the granite counters. Don't get me started on the cabinets and appliances.


Yeah, I thought that was hilarious.  I think I just spent north of a grand just to paint cabinets, add a backsplash, and change the sink.  A full gut and proper re-layout / renew with cabinets, stone, tile, new appliances, and a hint of structural work would be north of $30k -- if I DIY'ed _everything_.  And that's without gas plumbing in the equation (unfortunately).

Kitchen wins for cost -- with one caveat.  If you have anything resembling taste or an eye for quality *and* a real tile store (not some "Tile Store(TM)" or big box), you can get in trouble *fast*.  "Ooooh... that's nice..." < flip over sample card > "$75 a square?!"  Of course, the kitchen needs tile, too, but baths just seem like the place to use (a) a lot of (b) expensive tile, where the kitchen feels more appropriate to slap down builder grade stuff with a few high-end pieces thrown in, but YMMV.  I could see spending more in a bath if you care about tile and tub/faucet stuff more than appliances, but I have a hard time thinking there are many people who want a high end bath and cheap-o appliances / kitchen finishes.

If you're one to fall down the rabbit hole of pointless expense, it's way easier to spend more in the kitchen.  But both can become ridiculous money holes.

Someone tried to break into my house a while back:  I am not entirely kidding when I say I feel like hanging up signs saying, "the most expensive thing in this house is the tile cemented to the wall in the shower, dumbasses.  Good luck even moving that, let alone pawning it."

Of course, if you're an audiophile with more money than sense, the home theater wins the Stupid Amount Of Money contest by *leaps*and*bounds*, but that's a different topic.

As for numbers of baths... after reading this thread, I think it's all about what you're used to (like so many things!).  I spent the *vast* majority of my adult life in one-bath housing situations, so having two now seems to be both a luxury and an unnecessary pain in the ass.  I imagine it's a different game with kids, though.  Even then, two seems like enough, but to each their own.

/ would rather spend more on the garage than anywhere else, but that's still a project for another day
 
2014-06-04 10:36:28 AM  
I spent more on the bathroom than I did on my kitchen. Mainly because of partial paralysis --I need a walk-in tub and a toto bidet. Best money I ever spent. I recommend that setup to all, fully-limbed or not.
 
2014-06-04 10:37:15 AM  

adm_crunch: By the time I'm done with my luxury master bath remodel, it will be the most expensive room in the house. Doing it myself, so I'm saving thousands. Even then, it's gonna be north of $10K. Would probably have been 25-30K if I'd hired a pro.


Your kitchen must be a real shiat hole. Just cabinets, countertops, and flooring on a small kitchen would be more than 10,000. That does not include anything else.
 
2014-06-04 10:39:28 AM  

StopLurkListen: I'm taking notes. Our two bathrooms are at least 30 years past their useful life. The grout is disintegrating, the pipes are failing, and in general lots of stuff I won't be able to afford to fix :/


Careful.  I've done one and a half of those (one half measure to stop the onslaught of time; one full redo), and "we can reskin / renew" *quickly* becomes, "Crap.  We have to gut the whole thing and replace *everything*."

And if your grout is failing / unmaintained, your mold problem may be enormous.

Good luck!
 
2014-06-04 10:40:14 AM  

Trailltrader: If bathrooms are the most expensive in the house then someone can't do math.  Add up the price of the refrigerator, the stove, the microwave, the cabinets, the vent over the stove, and someone failed basic math in the 7th grade as compared to a sink, a toilet and a bath/shower.


Actually the bath and kitchen are a coin toss as to which is more expensive. Normally the appliances are not part of the construction cost, they are by definition a non-permanent part of the building.

That leaves electrical, hvac, plumbing and gas. Depending on the size of the two rooms I would say that a cramped bathroom would give any kitchen a run for its money.
 
2014-06-04 10:41:16 AM  
My thoughts on the matter are that you need one toilet per floor +1 for main bedroom. Most houses in my area have finished basements. That means a 1 story house should have 3 toilets. However almost all new construction is two story houses (cheaper per sq ft than 1story) which means 4 toilets.

I don't care if the toilet is in a half bath, three quarter bath, or full bath (with a family I would recommend 2 showers at least).

I think we can all agree 1/4 baths are disgusting. Wash your damn hands!
 
2014-06-04 10:41:42 AM  
I don't know what they used as a benchmark.  But it seems pretty obvious to me that the kitchen is FAR more expensive.

Anyway...  We have 2 full baths, and one half.  The 2 fulls are actually VERY convenient for 2 reasons.  1, when guests are over.  2, that one has a tub, where the other only has a shower.  So they both get used.  The half is necessary because it's downstairs.  And it's the only one with a fan.  For many reasons it is the one that is the most used.
 
2014-06-04 10:43:36 AM  

Elfich: Actually the bath and kitchen are a coin toss as to which is more expensive. Normally the appliances are not part of the construction cost, they are by definition a non-permanent part of the building.

That leaves electrical, hvac, plumbing and gas. Depending on the size of the two rooms I would say that a cramped bathroom would give any kitchen a run for its money.


If going that route, There is considerably more plumbing, electrical and gas needs in a kitchen as well as storage, flooring, etc. Avg kitchen versus avg bath is probably still double.
 
2014-06-04 10:43:57 AM  

Rigby-Reardon: My thoughts on the matter are that you need one toilet per floor +1 for main bedroom. Most houses in my area have finished basements. That means a 1 story house should have 3 toilets. However almost all new construction is two story houses (cheaper per sq ft than 1story) which means 4 toilets.

I don't care if the toilet is in a half bath, three quarter bath, or full bath (with a family I would recommend 2 showers at least).

I think we can all agree 1/4 baths are disgusting. Wash your damn hands!


This might sound like a silly question, but exactly how would you put a toilet in the basement?  Assuming it's below the drains, which it would be, you would require a pump to get the water out of there.  And that's not exactly easy considering the stuff that goes through a toilet.
 
2014-06-04 10:44:30 AM  

Rigby-Reardon: adm_crunch: By the time I'm done with my luxury master bath remodel, it will be the most expensive room in the house. Doing it myself, so I'm saving thousands. Even then, it's gonna be north of $10K. Would probably have been 25-30K if I'd hired a pro.

Just cabinets, countertops, and flooring on a small kitchen would be more than 10,000. That does not include anything else.


Yeah, when we did our kitchen remodel we were pretty "light" - no custom cabinets, we just resurfaced them ourselves. Cabinetry is wicked expensive. New linoleum floors*,  countertops, backsplash and electrical (old house, replaced the wiring and added under-cabinet lights) was about $20k.

*not actually linoleum, but something similar that's "eco-friendly". Can't remember what it's called. We preferred that over tile, it's easier on our feet when you're standing on it for a long time, and easy to clean. It's just not in fashion. Everyone wants tile/slate/etc
 
2014-06-04 10:45:20 AM  

doglover: doglover: Trailltrader: If bathrooms are the most expensive in the house then someone can't do math.

If your bathroom ISN'T the most expensive room in the house, you're doing it wrong.

[4.bp.blogspot.com image 450x566]

You see that? Those are diamonds.

Tywin Lannister is derisively said to shiat gold by his detractors. Whether he does or doesn't, I still want a toilet he'd be willing to use. Any old fire will cook food, and a fridge just has to be cold, but a toilet is a man's throne.


Damn you have to be more careful logging in and out of your alts.  I know you are just a troll/satirist but it's getting really sloppy lately.
 
2014-06-04 10:46:40 AM  
Bath " ROOM " ?www.nerdtests.comwww.flushtv.comwww.rotorama.comfc07.deviantart.net
 
2014-06-04 10:47:35 AM  

SFSailor: StopLurkListen: I'm taking notes. Our two bathrooms are at least 30 years past their useful life. The grout is disintegrating, the pipes are failing, and in general lots of stuff I won't be able to afford to fix :/

Careful.  I've done one and a half of those (one half measure to stop the onslaught of time; one full redo), and "we can reskin / renew" *quickly* becomes, "Crap.  We have to gut the whole thing and replace *everything*."

And if your grout is failing / unmaintained, your mold problem may be enormous.

Good luck!


Sigh. Yeah, I know ... Gutting is almost guaranteed. Thanks!
 
2014-06-04 10:50:03 AM  
The house I'm buying has two. One for me and one for him. Because without fail, right before I need to leave for work (and need to pee before I go) he's in there taking a dump.
 
2014-06-04 10:51:06 AM  

hasty ambush: AverageAmericanGuy: One off the living room (for guests). One connected to the master bedroom. One for general use at the other end of the upstairs hall.

That's the bare minimum, unless you live in a studio apartment the size of a shoebox.

You'd also want one in the garage, if possible. And one connected to the guest bedroom for their privacy.

So 5 bathrooms are needed as a minimum for a typical home. I'm not sure why anyone's trying to insinuate that having three is somehow wasteful.

I am not sure why anyone is trying to dictate how many bathrooms somebody should be allowed to have.


The same type of extremists that prattle on about the evils of property rights and admonish people for owning a truck or having grass in their yard.
 
2014-06-04 10:52:44 AM  

StopLurkListen: I'm taking notes. Our two bathrooms are at least 30 years past their useful life. The grout is disintegrating, the pipes are failing, and in general lots of stuff I won't be able to afford to fix :/


Do the work yourself....it won't be that expensive.
 
2014-06-04 10:52:53 AM  
we have 3 bedrooms (master for my wife and me, and each kid has their own) and 2 full bathrooms. each bathroom has 1 sink, 1 toilet, 1 tub, and the master has a separate shower as well, and the master tub is a garden tub, or whatever you call those gigantic things built into the corner.

this is plenty for us 4.

when we have guests, there's never a problem.

if you want more bathrooms, great. i would love a urinal in my outside building when i eventually get one. the building will be a music/hangout room
 
2014-06-04 10:54:06 AM  

StopLurkListen: SFSailor: StopLurkListen: I'm taking notes. Our two bathrooms are at least 30 years past their useful life. The grout is disintegrating, the pipes are failing, and in general lots of stuff I won't be able to afford to fix :/

Careful.  I've done one and a half of those (one half measure to stop the onslaught of time; one full redo), and "we can reskin / renew" *quickly* becomes, "Crap.  We have to gut the whole thing and replace *everything*."

And if your grout is failing / unmaintained, your mold problem may be enormous.

Good luck!

Sigh. Yeah, I know ... Gutting is almost guaranteed. Thanks!


Full gutting can be faster, cheaper and easier in most cases.
 
2014-06-04 11:00:33 AM  

WGJ: It just ain't right for a man to shiat inside his own house.


Really?

I hate shiatting anywhere but on my own toilet.  I've got 3 and I almost always use one in particular.  I can see the TV from it if I leave the door open and I always take the remote with me.  I live in fear that someday disaster will strike and the remote will fall in the toilet.  How will I change the channel if that happens?
 
2014-06-04 11:02:58 AM  

wxboy: "Need" is a big word.  Does anyone really need a dishwasher?  Or a garage?


You're goddamn right they're needed.
 
2014-06-04 11:08:25 AM  

durbnpoisn


This might sound like a silly question, but exactly how would you put a toilet in the basement? Assuming it's below the drains, which it would be, you would require a pump to get the water out of there. And that's not exactly easy considering the stuff that goes through a toilet.


Some houses are built with rough-ins in the basement to facilitate building a bathroom later. It would be pretty easy to install a toilet (properly) in such a place.

And your assumption is not correct. :-) Even in my previous house (early 20th century) the drains and sewer lines were below basement level.
 
2014-06-04 11:09:03 AM  

gfid: WGJ: It just ain't right for a man to shiat inside his own house.

Really?

I hate shiatting anywhere but on my own toilet.  I've got 3 and I almost always use one in particular.  I can see the TV from it if I leave the door open and I always take the remote with me.  I live in fear that someday disaster will strike and the remote will fall in the toilet.  How will I change the channel if that happens?


You should really reevalute your diet.
 
2014-06-04 11:10:43 AM  

durbnpoisn: Rigby-Reardon: My thoughts on the matter are that you need one toilet per floor +1 for main bedroom. Most houses in my area have finished basements. That means a 1 story house should have 3 toilets. However almost all new construction is two story houses (cheaper per sq ft than 1story) which means 4 toilets.

I don't care if the toilet is in a half bath, three quarter bath, or full bath (with a family I would recommend 2 showers at least).

I think we can all agree 1/4 baths are disgusting. Wash your damn hands!

This might sound like a silly question, but exactly how would you put a toilet in the basement?  Assuming it's below the drains, which it would be, you would require a pump to get the water out of there.  And that's not exactly easy considering the stuff that goes through a toilet.


In most houses built with basements the main drain leaves below the basement floor, so no pump is needed. If you happen to live in an area where the basement is deeper than the city sewer lines you can get a pump system to pump up to the drains (there are pumps that are capable of pumping concrete during construction, there are plenty that can handle some crap).

The lowest spot in my house is 10' below ground and the drain still goes out under the floor. The house is on a hill though.
 
2014-06-04 11:11:03 AM  

durbnpoisn: This might sound like a silly question, but exactly how would you put a toilet in the basement?  Assuming it's below the drains, which it would be, you would require a pump to get the water out of there.  And that's not exactly easy considering the stuff that goes through a toilet.


Sewage sump and solids-passing sump pump.  Way more disgusting than it even sounds, if you can believe it.  I have one in the basement (can only guess why, thinking an unnecessary "maintain headroom!" goal at some point?) and it's on the list of things that need to go.  But it's possible.

StopLurkListen: Sigh. Yeah, I know ... Gutting is almost guaranteed. Thanks!


Gutting is just the start.  Depending on age, quality of construction and the wrath of time, you might have structure work to do, too.  Ahhh, scope creep.

But!  At least when it's done, you'll know it's right.  And that the mold is gone.  For now.

probesport: Full gutting can be faster, cheaper and easier in most cases.


I don't know if I'd agree with "most," but certainly some, and it depends on what needs to be addressed.  It really is a U-shaped curve, though, isn't it?  A quick refresh can be cheap and easy, but at some point "repair" is just more trouble and fidgety ass-pain than "gut it, and start over."  Maybe "as soon as you want to move plumbing" is the break point?
 
2014-06-04 11:12:30 AM  

Trailltrader: If bathrooms are the most expensive in the house then someone can't do math.  Add up the price of the refrigerator, the stove, the microwave, the cabinets, the vent over the stove, and someone failed basic math in the 7th grade as compared to a sink, a toilet and a bath/shower.


I bought a house last year; the upstairs bathroom basin and faucet together cost the previous owner $5200 (according to him), and that's not even considering the fancy toilet and shower they put in - I found the toilet on Kohler's website and by itself it starts at over $1000.  They must have run out of money at that point though, because they self-installed cheap wood laminate flooring and cut the edges all wrong.

I would never spend that kind of money on a bathroom, but I guess some people do.
 
2014-06-04 11:13:31 AM  

durbnpoisn: Rigby-Reardon: My thoughts on the matter are that you need one toilet per floor +1 for main bedroom. Most houses in my area have finished basements. That means a 1 story house should have 3 toilets. However almost all new construction is two story houses (cheaper per sq ft than 1story) which means 4 toilets.

I don't care if the toilet is in a half bath, three quarter bath, or full bath (with a family I would recommend 2 showers at least).

I think we can all agree 1/4 baths are disgusting. Wash your damn hands!

This might sound like a silly question, but exactly how would you put a toilet in the basement?  Assuming it's below the drains, which it would be, you would require a pump to get the water out of there.  And that's not exactly easy considering the stuff that goes through a toilet.


I can't speak for everyone obviously, but my house is built partially on a hill, and the foundation is build so that the main level floor is at least 2-3' higher than ground level at the back of the house and closer to 4' near the front so my basement isn't exactly that much further down.  The main plumbing stack goes all the way down.  I'd be willing to wager that any house with a working bathroom in the basement had it stubbed out from the beginning and the main stack went all the way down there to begin with (exit from the house lower than the point it needed to be for the basement to go into it).  Unless people just had a shiatload of money to redo all that plumbing.  Thinking about it, it has to be done this way if you want water for anything in the basement.  Sinks, laundry, etc.
 
2014-06-04 11:21:33 AM  

probesport: You should really reevalute your diet.


Why?

I had a ham sandwich and carne asada for breakfast.

Now I'm drinking a beer.

WTF have you eaten today?
 
2014-06-04 11:22:08 AM  
Yo I heard you are on the go and you gotta go while you go on the go.

www.digitaltrends.com

Can't never outweird the Asian girls.
 
2014-06-04 11:23:11 AM  

gfid: probesport: You should really reevalute your diet.

Why?

I had a ham sandwich and carne asada for breakfast.

Now I'm drinking a beer.

WTF have you eaten today?


Its only 11:22 here, I've had a banana. But my comment was if you are spending that much time on the toilet then you may have other issues.
 
2014-06-04 11:27:28 AM  
As long as you have a 5-gallon bucket and a toilet seat, EVERY room's a bathroom!

\you're welcome
 
2014-06-04 11:32:56 AM  

probesport: Its only 11:22 here, I've had a banana. But my comment was if you are spending that much time on the toilet then you may have other issues.


Okay.  Except I didn't say how much time I spent shiatting.  I just like to watch TV and shiat on my own toilet in my own home when I shiat.

Some people read while they shiat.

Other people play with their phones.

Some people even talk on their phones.

I suppose there are even people who sit there and stare at the walls.

I can watch TV, so I do.
 
2014-06-04 11:36:07 AM  

probesport: gfid: probesport: You should really reevalute your diet.

Why?

I had a ham sandwich and carne asada for breakfast.

Now I'm drinking a beer.

WTF have you eaten today?

Its only 11:22 here, I've had a banana. But my comment was if you are spending that much time on the toilet then you may have other issues.


central time zone here...10:30...been up since 4:45. i've had potatoes/sausage/scrambled eggs for breakfast, and a banana and 2 carrots for mid-morning snacks, along with a large travel mug of coffee, and about 1.5 quarts of water. by the end of the day i will have eaten some sort of beans or peas, and another banana, along with whatever else i eat...and probably at least 1/2 pot more of coffee. anyone who spends THAT much time on the terlet needs more fiber and water...and coffee tends to loosen the bowels as well. i'm typically in and out in under 3 minutes, 2 to 3 times per day. i pee about once an hour.

/tmi?
//maybe
///actually, wftmi
 
2014-06-04 11:37:59 AM  

Cygnus God of Balance: The article doesn't quantify how bathrooms are "the most expensive room in the house" Cost of construction? Maintenance/upkeep, water?  I don't get it - as someone pointed out, the kitchen is WAY more expensive.  At any rate, I suppose the "tree hugger" author is probably a "if it's yellow let it mellow" type - I knew one of those once - freakin GROSS.

I found the linked account of 43% of new home buyers using cash more intriguing.


If it's yellow, drink more water 'cause you're dehydrated.
 
2014-06-04 11:40:14 AM  

kitsuneymg: Cygnus God of Balance: The article doesn't quantify how bathrooms are "the most expensive room in the house" Cost of construction? Maintenance/upkeep, water?  I don't get it - as someone pointed out, the kitchen is WAY more expensive.  At any rate, I suppose the "tree hugger" author is probably a "if it's yellow let it mellow" type - I knew one of those once - freakin GROSS.

I found the linked account of 43% of new home buyers using cash more intriguing.

If it's yellow, drink more water 'cause you're dehydrated.


Or you take alot of vitamins.
 
2014-06-04 11:54:07 AM  

Slackfumasta: Trailltrader: If bathrooms are the most expensive in the house then someone can't do math.  Add up the price of the refrigerator, the stove, the microwave, the cabinets, the vent over the stove, and someone failed basic math in the 7th grade as compared to a sink, a toilet and a bath/shower.

I bought a house last year; the upstairs bathroom basin and faucet together cost the previous owner $5200 (according to him), and that's not even considering the fancy toilet and shower they put in - I found the toilet on Kohler's website and by itself it starts at over $1000.  They must have run out of money at that point though, because they self-installed cheap wood laminate flooring and cut the edges all wrong.

I would never spend that kind of money on a bathroom, but I guess some people do.


That sounds high, but remodeling a kitchen can easily go 40-50k, cabinets are farking expensive, I spent more on cabinets (and I got the relatively cheap ones) than I did on appliances and granite combined.
 
2014-06-04 11:54:31 AM  
Lived with one bathroom most of my life.

Saw a two-bedroom townhouse several years ago with two full baths and two half-baths.  Times have changed.
 
2014-06-04 11:58:44 AM  

bungle_jr: probesport: gfid: probesport: You should really reevalute your diet.

Why?

I had a ham sandwich and carne asada for breakfast.

Now I'm drinking a beer.

WTF have you eaten today?

Its only 11:22 here, I've had a banana. But my comment was if you are spending that much time on the toilet then you may have other issues.

central time zone here...10:30...been up since 4:45. i've had potatoes/sausage/scrambled eggs for breakfast, and a banana and 2 carrots for mid-morning snacks, along with a large travel mug of coffee, and about 1.5 quarts of water. by the end of the day i will have eaten some sort of beans or peas, and another banana, along with whatever else i eat...and probably at least 1/2 pot more of coffee. anyone who spends THAT much time on the terlet needs more fiber and water...and coffee tends to loosen the bowels as well. i'm typically in and out in under 3 minutes, 2 to 3 times per day. i pee about once an hour.

/tmi?
//maybe
///actually, wftmi


POOP THREAD!
 
2014-06-04 12:01:43 PM  
Baths and Kitchens are easily the most expensive rooms in the house.

As for number of baths required, that depends on your family size (or if you even have a family at all.) Typically, over say the last 30 years or so, you're going to have 2 full baths (tub/shower combo, pisser and sink) and probably at least one quarter bath (sink and pisser.) Extra points are awarded for a what is called a half-bath (shower stall, sink and pisser) and you're off the charts if your master has an ensuite (that's the big farker with a full shower and and a big-ass tub and room for farking easy chairs.)

Growing up, we had a 2 fulls and a quarter bath. Since I moved to New Mexico, we've never had more than two baths in our older homes. With 3 kids, it's imperative that the disgusting spawn have they're own bathroom. Kids are filthy.
 
2014-06-04 12:02:29 PM  
I do need a new bathroom, my place was built in 79-80 and previous owners half assed some repairs on the tile and it got worse. I had to spend my renovation money on other plumbing repairs, but I hope to soon have a new bathroom. It would be nice if I had two but my roomate would claim one fill it full of her garbage and take over the other. The only problem I have had sharing a bathroom with females was when my roomate and a bunch of her friends were getting ready for a wedding. I almost had to pee in the back yard, stupid girls.
 
2014-06-04 12:02:48 PM  

probesport: kitsuneymg: Cygnus God of Balance: The article doesn't quantify how bathrooms are "the most expensive room in the house" Cost of construction? Maintenance/upkeep, water?  I don't get it - as someone pointed out, the kitchen is WAY more expensive.  At any rate, I suppose the "tree hugger" author is probably a "if it's yellow let it mellow" type - I knew one of those once - freakin GROSS.

I found the linked account of 43% of new home buyers using cash more intriguing.

If it's yellow, drink more water 'cause you're dehydrated.

Or you take alot of vitamins.


or drink a lot of things besides just plain water
mine is often yellowish. i drink more water than most folks, plus coffee, and sometimes a soda, milk, juice, whatever. very rarely is it actually completely clear
 
2014-06-04 12:09:21 PM  

loaba: Baths and Kitchens are easily the most expensive rooms in the house.

As for number of baths required, that depends on your family size (or if you even have a family at all.) Typically, over say the last 30 years or so, you're going to have 2 full baths (tub/shower combo, pisser and sink) and probably at least one quarter bath (sink and pisser.) Extra points are awarded for a what is called a half-bath (shower stall, sink and pisser) and you're off the charts if your master has an ensuite (that's the big farker with a full shower and and a big-ass tub and room for farking easy chairs.)

Growing up, we had a 2 fulls and a quarter bath. Since I moved to New Mexico, we've never had more than two baths in our older homes. With 3 kids, it's imperative that the disgusting spawn have they're own bathroom. Kids are filthy.


Your count is wrong. Each fixture is a quarter. Sink, toilet, shower, tub. Now a tub can have a shower in it or you can have a separate tub and shower.
1/4 bath = toilet only
1/2 bath = toilet& sink
3/4 bath = toilet , sink, & shower stall
Full bath = toilet, sink, tub & shower
 
2014-06-04 12:09:49 PM  
Does the toilet on my front porch count as a bathroom?
 
2014-06-04 12:10:04 PM  

on the road: Lived with one bathroom most of my life.

Saw a two-bedroom townhouse several years ago with two full baths and two half-baths.  Times have changed.


For singles or childless couples, one bath is fine. Add in filthy spawn and it sucks. Not to say you're 3rd-world or anything, with just one bath, but it's nice when the kids have their own filth-zone.

Generally, older homes from the 50's are going to be smaller and only have one bath. Gawd, how it would be nice to not need so much space.
 
2014-06-04 12:18:57 PM  
Most expensive room in my house has always been my office.

Every time I get an office space at home, we have another kid.  Know what it costs to raise a kid until they are 18 these days?
 
2014-06-04 12:23:53 PM  

i.r.id10t: Most expensive room in my house has always been my office.

Every time I get an office space at home, we have another kid.  Know what it costs to raise a kid until they are 18 these days?


A farking boat-load of cash. And for all you singles, don't even give me that tax rebate shiate. Spawning costs money. Lots of it.
 
2014-06-04 12:26:11 PM  

loaba: With 3 kids, it's imperative that the disgusting spawn have they're own bathroom. Kids are filthy.


I have 2 kids, never got into the filth thing luckily we have been just fine with 1 bath.
 
2014-06-04 12:28:45 PM  

probesport: loaba: With 3 kids, it's imperative that the disgusting spawn have they're own bathroom. Kids are filthy.

I have 2 kids, never got into the filth thing luckily we have been just fine with 1 bath.


We're a family of 5 - keeping things clean can be a challenge.
 
2014-06-04 12:29:40 PM  

Englebert Slaptyback: durbnpoisn

This might sound like a silly question, but exactly how would you put a toilet in the basement? Assuming it's below the drains, which it would be, you would require a pump to get the water out of there. And that's not exactly easy considering the stuff that goes through a toilet.


Some houses are built with rough-ins in the basement to facilitate building a bathroom later. It would be pretty easy to install a toilet (properly) in such a place.

And your assumption is not correct. :-) Even in my previous house (early 20th century) the drains and sewer lines were below basement level.


Well, that's not always true, especially in areas where the water table is close to the surface.  Then you need one of these:

ep.yimg.com
 
2014-06-04 12:44:25 PM  
I don't get the "Master bathroom". I'm fine sharing with family, at least my immediate family. It feels like conspicuous consumption to me to have your own bathroom.

At least 1-1/2 is a must, though. Two people and one bathroom requires calling "dibs" on the way home from somewhere. The old apartment with one was a pain, but the new place has 2-1/2 in a good arrangement, one on each floor including the basement. Not having to line up or roam the house is nice.

We still can't shower in both at the same time, but that's due to old plumbing full of 90º elbows and done in 1/2" copper right from the meter. You have to run 3/4" or 1", depending on materials, around the house to avoid the pressure drop of multiple taps being used at once. You'd be surprised what good plumbing does, and I'm going to put in modern temperature balancing fixtures in the showers as well to avoid all surprises.

I find 1/2" in all kinds of older houses, and it bothers me. It may have been cheaper, but they always used so many unnecessary 90º elbows that they didn't save much by the end of it. Even worse are the places with 1/4" pipe sections twisting around through the joists; I've seen water trickle out of faucets not due to lack of pressure, just too little flow left.
 
2014-06-04 12:48:23 PM  

Deucednuisance


Well, that's not always true, especially in areas where the water table is close to the surface. Then you need one of these:


That's a fair point; I should have allowed for some exceptions. You bastard. ;-)

However, I have to ask: how many locations might there be where the water table is low enough to make a basement feasible but high enough to make below-basement-level sewage infeasible? Honest question, btw. Unless the basement is waterproofed exceedingly well this looks like an invitation to headache.

Or is it intended more as a retrofit where someone wants a basement bathroom and a new sewer line would be prohibitively expensive?
 
2014-06-04 12:51:04 PM  

loaba: probesport: loaba: With 3 kids, it's imperative that the disgusting spawn have they're own bathroom. Kids are filthy.

I have 2 kids, never got into the filth thing luckily we have been just fine with 1 bath.

We're a family of 5 - keeping things clean can be a challenge.


It must be that one extra that destroys everything. But my kids are older now 10 and 13, cleaning has been part of their chores since they could walk.
 
2014-06-04 12:55:48 PM  

Englebert Slaptyback: Deucednuisance

Well, that's not always true, especially in areas where the water table is close to the surface. Then you need one of these:


That's a fair point; I should have allowed for some exceptions. You bastard. ;-)

However, I have to ask: how many locations might there be where the water table is low enough to make a basement feasible but high enough to make below-basement-level sewage infeasible? Honest question, btw. Unless the basement is waterproofed exceedingly well this looks like an invitation to headache.

Or is it intended more as a retrofit where someone wants a basement bathroom and a new sewer line would be prohibitively expensive?


My 1920 house sewer drain is about a foot off the basement floor. Macerator and pump are my only options for downstairs. I am fairly certain my house was not originally built with a bathroom as it was a farm hand house.
 
2014-06-04 12:56:54 PM  
Heh. My dad's parents raised eight kids with an outhouse. (Actually, I think they had a double, and they might have gotten indoor plumbing before the last kid came along.)

We grew up in a house with two adults, two boys and one bath, and it really wasn't okay -- it was great when we moved up to two baths.

Now, we've got two adults, two kids and three baths, and there's rarely a day goes by that we don't have all three occupied for at least half an hour or so. We could make do with less, but we're grateful that we don't have to.
 
2014-06-04 01:05:35 PM  

Englebert Slaptyback: Deucednuisance

Well, that's not always true, especially in areas where the water table is close to the surface. Then you need one of these:


That's a fair point; I should have allowed for some exceptions. You bastard. ;-)

However, I have to ask: how many locations might there be where the water table is low enough to make a basement feasible but high enough to make below-basement-level sewage infeasible? Honest question, btw. Unless the basement is waterproofed exceedingly well this looks like an invitation to headache.

Or is it intended more as a retrofit where someone wants a basement bathroom and a new sewer line would be prohibitively expensive?


Very common for houses with septic tanks on a level lot to have the sewage leaving several feet above the basement floor - otherwise the septic tank needs to be buried fairly far below the surface, creating a pain when it needs to be pumped.  I've lived in six houses with septic tanks (three on sloped lots with walk-out basements), and only two have had the sewage depart through the basement floor.

Fortunately, my current house has the existing plumbing exiting through the floor, so putting a terlet down there is a feasible option (whenever I finally get around to finishing it, which probably won't be for a while, if ever).
 
2014-06-04 01:07:15 PM  

Englebert Slaptyback: Deucednuisance

Well, that's not always true, especially in areas where the water table is close to the surface. Then you need one of these:


That's a fair point; I should have allowed for some exceptions. You bastard. ;-)

However, I have to ask: how many locations might there be where the water table is low enough to make a basement feasible but high enough to make below-basement-level sewage infeasible? Honest question, btw. Unless the basement is waterproofed exceedingly well this looks like an invitation to headache.

Or is it intended more as a retrofit where someone wants a basement bathroom and a new sewer line would be prohibitively expensive?


It is not just for a case of low water table. If your basement is downhill from the street and you are hooking up to city sewer you may need to pump sewage up hill to the city sewer.
 
2014-06-04 01:11:13 PM  

AverageAmericanGuy: One off the living room (for guests). One connected to the master bedroom. One for general use at the other end of the upstairs hall.

That's the bare minimum, unless you live in a studio apartment the size of a shoebox.

You'd also want one in the garage, if possible. And one connected to the guest bedroom for their privacy.

So 5 bathrooms are needed as a minimum for a typical home. I'm not sure why anyone's trying to insinuate that having three is somehow wasteful.


9 of us shared 2 bathrooms growing up in the 50s. Nobody danced around holding themselves. Nobody's privacy was violated. No guests looked strained or embarrassed. No trail of tinkle or unexplained smells.

5 bathrooms? It isn't only politics that's gone nuts.
 
2014-06-04 01:20:11 PM  

Rigby-Reardon: Englebert Slaptyback: Deucednuisance

Well, that's not always true, especially in areas where the water table is close to the surface. Then you need one of these:


That's a fair point; I should have allowed for some exceptions. You bastard. ;-)

However, I have to ask: how many locations might there be where the water table is low enough to make a basement feasible but high enough to make below-basement-level sewage infeasible? Honest question, btw. Unless the basement is waterproofed exceedingly well this looks like an invitation to headache.

Or is it intended more as a retrofit where someone wants a basement bathroom and a new sewer line would be prohibitively expensive?

It is not just for a case of low water table. If your basement is downhill from the street and you are hooking up to city sewer you may need to pump sewage up hill to the city sewer.


We looked into putting a entire bathroom in the basement and the complexity and cost is somewhere between the Oscar broadcast and sending a man to Mars.
 
2014-06-04 01:21:44 PM  

Rigby-Reardon: Englebert Slaptyback: Deucednuisance

Well, that's not always true, especially in areas where the water table is close to the surface. Then you need one of these:


That's a fair point; I should have allowed for some exceptions. You bastard. ;-)

However, I have to ask: how many locations might there be where the water table is low enough to make a basement feasible but high enough to make below-basement-level sewage infeasible? Honest question, btw. Unless the basement is waterproofed exceedingly well this looks like an invitation to headache.

Or is it intended more as a retrofit where someone wants a basement bathroom and a new sewer line would be prohibitively expensive?

It is not just for a case of low water table. If your basement is downhill from the street and you are hooking up to city sewer you may need to pump sewage up hill to the city sewer.


All true, as are the excellent comments above yours.

"Water Table" just came to mind first, as I have lived most of my life near Annapolis, and the older waterfront homes have slab foundations because you just can't dig very deep, because you're right on the water.  It's just the application I've seen most often, certainly not the only, or even the most common, use.  As I and my contemporary's approach our sixties, many of us have elderly parents moving in, and a common approach is to build a mother-in-law apartment in a basement not already plumbed for a commode, which necessitates a macerating pump to get the waste water up to the existing sewer line.

It's not that different from a plain old sump pump, really, except that it needs to handle paper and poo.

Or, as in the case of my Mom, once the dementia started really kicking in, her diapers.  Needless to say, that material exceeded specifications.  But that's what the big hatch on the side is for.

What has been seen cannot be unseen.
 
2014-06-04 01:24:33 PM  

probesport: loaba: probesport: loaba: With 3 kids, it's imperative that the disgusting spawn have they're own bathroom. Kids are filthy.

I have 2 kids, never got into the filth thing luckily we have been just fine with 1 bath.

We're a family of 5 - keeping things clean can be a challenge.

It must be that one extra that destroys everything. But my kids are older now 10 and 13, cleaning has been part of their chores since they could walk.


Well you must have the two exceptions - we've got a 2-yr old boy and a 5-yr old bag-lady. Neither one is the least bit interested in clean-up time, which is a funny thing because the 5-yr old will happily sing "clean up/clean up/ everybody does their share". Our 11-yr old man-boy has no concept of cleaning up after himself.

/and they all wonder why Dad gives 'em the evil eye...
 
2014-06-04 01:25:44 PM  
First off, the kitchen is the most expensive room in the house. That being said, three bathrooms is good for a decent sized two story house. One downstairs, one off the master bedroom and one more to be shared by the rest of the upstais. As anyone who has teenagers knows, you don't want to be waiting on one when you need to take your morning dump.
 
2014-06-04 01:33:55 PM  

ReapTheChaos: First off, the kitchen is the most expensive room in the house. That being said, three bathrooms is good for a decent sized two story house. One downstairs, one off the master bedroom and one more to be shared by the rest of the upstais. As anyone who has teenagers knows, you don't want to be waiting on one when you need to take your morning dump.


that's when i run over to cleveland's house.
what's that? he moved back to quahog?
dammit!
 
2014-06-04 01:39:07 PM  

sethen320: FTA: " Danielle points out that most of the people buying houses in the States are doing it with cash, so we are talking mostly about the 1% driving the single family house market these days..."


Forget the bathrooms, that statement warrants an article by itself.


You don't have to be in the 1% to pay cash for a house. Last year I sold my almost-paid-off big house in the city and bought a smaller house in the country. I had enough equity in the old house to pay cash for the new one. We baby boomers are starting to retire, and I would imagine a lot of us are downsizing our houses now that the kids are gone.
 
2014-06-04 01:46:52 PM  
I have my own bathroom which adjoins to the guest bedroom I use in the morning. That's the one thing I miss the most when out of town family members come and stay!
 
2014-06-04 02:06:54 PM  

probesport: Most expensive room in the house is subjective based on what you do.

Kitchen, can be done cheaply with $200 appliances or for 10s of thousands with the right stuff.

Living room, if thats your entertainment space the dollars can add up rapidly

Foyer, again dressed out can be costly

Garage, can equal the cost of the house if you are a car collector / mechanic

Bathroom, it can get up there but third in line from my view.

For me, the cheapest rooms in the house are bedrooms.

Here is my personal ranking from most expensive to cheapest.

Garage
Kitchen
Living Room
Bathroom
Foyer
Bedrooms
Pantry


No way is the garage typically the most expensive place in a house - either from the perspective of construction or ongoing expense.  As big as it can be, it's usually concrete floor, no support beams, no plumbing, no appliances.  It consumes very little energy, as it's usually unheated, and lit sparingly and infrequently.

It's essentially a shed attached to a house.
 
2014-06-04 02:22:13 PM  

Hagbardr: One communal bath house per block for shiats and showers. Used milk jugs when you need to piss.


I prefer the orange juice bottles, they have a big enough opening for me.
 
2014-06-04 02:23:01 PM  

Babwa Wawa: probesport: Most expensive room in the house is subjective based on what you do.

Kitchen, can be done cheaply with $200 appliances or for 10s of thousands with the right stuff.

Living room, if thats your entertainment space the dollars can add up rapidly

Foyer, again dressed out can be costly

Garage, can equal the cost of the house if you are a car collector / mechanic

Bathroom, it can get up there but third in line from my view.

For me, the cheapest rooms in the house are bedrooms.

Here is my personal ranking from most expensive to cheapest.

Garage
Kitchen
Living Room
Bathroom
Foyer
Bedrooms
Pantry

No way is the garage typically the most expensive place in a house - either from the perspective of construction or ongoing expense.  As big as it can be, it's usually concrete floor, no support beams, no plumbing, no appliances.  It consumes very little energy, as it's usually unheated, and lit sparingly and infrequently.

It's essentially a shed attached to a house.


You obviously don't have the same garage I do.  Nor do you seem to appreciate cars.
 
2014-06-04 02:25:15 PM  

Babwa Wawa: No way is the garage typically the most expensive place in a house - either from the perspective of construction or ongoing expense.  As big as it can be, it's usually concrete floor, no support beams, no plumbing, no appliances.  It consumes very little energy, as it's usually unheated, and lit sparingly and infrequently.

It's essentially a shed attached to a house.


My personal ranking, not yours.

Mine is cinderblock, detached, with shop area, 100amp service, heated, air conditioned, floor drains, 30' ceiling, plumbed for water and air, 6 rows of fluorescent lighting, factory style steel tilt windows, formica countertops, mucho cabinets and storage and thats just the construction aspect.

Also the concrete used has to have specific rating to handle a lift.
 
2014-06-04 02:38:02 PM  

probesport: Also the concrete used has to have specific rating to handle a lift.


rohar: You obviously don't have the same garage I do.  Nor do you seem to appreciate cars.


A residential garage is a place to put your car to protect it from the elements.  Most people would call what you both are describing a "shop".
 
2014-06-04 02:40:57 PM  

Babwa Wawa: probesport: Also the concrete used has to have specific rating to handle a lift.

rohar: You obviously don't have the same garage I do.  Nor do you seem to appreciate cars.

A residential garage is a place to put your car to protect it from the elements.  Most people would call what you both are describing a "shop".


I call mine a temple.  3500 SqFt on the first floor, we don't want to discuss the second floor.
 
2014-06-04 02:44:20 PM  

Babwa Wawa: probesport: Also the concrete used has to have specific rating to handle a lift.

rohar: You obviously don't have the same garage I do.  Nor do you seem to appreciate cars.

A residential garage is a place to put your car to protect it from the elements.  Most people would call what you both are describing a "shop".


Hey its a better hobby then just shiatting in different places in your house.

rohar: I call mine a temple.  3500 SqFt on the first floor, we don't want to discuss the second floor.


I refer to that as the loft. A clean room and a place for gearheads to crash during late night projects.
 
2014-06-04 03:10:15 PM  

probesport: I refer to that as the loft. A clean room and a place for gearheads to crash during late night projects.


Amateur.  We generally fall asleep under the cars we're working on due to inebriation.  The floor heating almost guarantees the result.  Waking up sucks though, you forget where you fell asleep and your reaction is to sit up.  There are numerous transmission dents on my forehead.
 
2014-06-04 03:30:51 PM  

rohar: probesport: I refer to that as the loft. A clean room and a place for gearheads to crash during late night projects.

Amateur.  We generally fall asleep under the cars we're working on due to inebriation.  The floor heating almost guarantees the result.  Waking up sucks though, you forget where you fell asleep and your reaction is to sit up.  There are numerous transmission dents on my forehead.


Just feeling the effects of 20 years of wrenching, I have come to welcome a good nights sleep.
 
2014-06-04 04:11:04 PM  

Prank Call of Cthulhu: I guess you need extra toilets too if you're breeding spastic dorks that have to be strapped in to do their business.
[i.imgur.com image 519x960]


This cracks me the fark up every time I see it.
 
2014-06-04 04:31:16 PM  
My wife and I shower in the master bathroom but I use the guest bathroom for everything else (unless there are guests). If we ever had to share a toilet again it would end in death or divorce.

We also have a powder room downstairs which we could easily live without but I doubt it would have saved much in construction costs and it would be a huge negative for resale.
 
2014-06-04 04:48:54 PM  

hej: Crudbucket: We just moved into a new apartment and the bathrooms are carpeted. I don't farking get it.

It helps insure all the stray urine sprinkles get extra fermented over time.


My grandmothers house had carpeted bathrooms. She also liked to put those big fuzzy covers on the toilet lid, so the lid and the seat never stayed up on their own. You'd have to stand there, slightly hunched over the toilet with one hand holding the seat up and the other aiming the nozzle.
 
2014-06-04 05:57:33 PM  
Just popped back in to say thanks for the responses re: the basement sewage pumps.


Really never thought I'd say that but here we are.
 
2014-06-04 07:52:55 PM  

Buster 49: Does a window count as a toilet?


It does in parts of Africa

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flying_toilet
 
2014-06-04 09:15:44 PM  

lokis_mentor: Subby obviously doesnt have 3 daughters.  You don't want them anywhere near your throne.


That. Women and bathrooms are like cats and litterboxes - experts recommend one per critter (or cooter, as you may prefer) and then one extra.
 
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