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(TreeHugger)   Bathrooms are the most expensive rooms in the house, do you really need three?   (treehugger.com) divider line 172
    More: Unlikely, Kohler  
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4882 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Jun 2014 at 8:35 AM (14 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-06-04 01:20:11 PM

Rigby-Reardon: Englebert Slaptyback: Deucednuisance

Well, that's not always true, especially in areas where the water table is close to the surface. Then you need one of these:


That's a fair point; I should have allowed for some exceptions. You bastard. ;-)

However, I have to ask: how many locations might there be where the water table is low enough to make a basement feasible but high enough to make below-basement-level sewage infeasible? Honest question, btw. Unless the basement is waterproofed exceedingly well this looks like an invitation to headache.

Or is it intended more as a retrofit where someone wants a basement bathroom and a new sewer line would be prohibitively expensive?

It is not just for a case of low water table. If your basement is downhill from the street and you are hooking up to city sewer you may need to pump sewage up hill to the city sewer.


We looked into putting a entire bathroom in the basement and the complexity and cost is somewhere between the Oscar broadcast and sending a man to Mars.
 
2014-06-04 01:21:44 PM

Rigby-Reardon: Englebert Slaptyback: Deucednuisance

Well, that's not always true, especially in areas where the water table is close to the surface. Then you need one of these:


That's a fair point; I should have allowed for some exceptions. You bastard. ;-)

However, I have to ask: how many locations might there be where the water table is low enough to make a basement feasible but high enough to make below-basement-level sewage infeasible? Honest question, btw. Unless the basement is waterproofed exceedingly well this looks like an invitation to headache.

Or is it intended more as a retrofit where someone wants a basement bathroom and a new sewer line would be prohibitively expensive?

It is not just for a case of low water table. If your basement is downhill from the street and you are hooking up to city sewer you may need to pump sewage up hill to the city sewer.


All true, as are the excellent comments above yours.

"Water Table" just came to mind first, as I have lived most of my life near Annapolis, and the older waterfront homes have slab foundations because you just can't dig very deep, because you're right on the water.  It's just the application I've seen most often, certainly not the only, or even the most common, use.  As I and my contemporary's approach our sixties, many of us have elderly parents moving in, and a common approach is to build a mother-in-law apartment in a basement not already plumbed for a commode, which necessitates a macerating pump to get the waste water up to the existing sewer line.

It's not that different from a plain old sump pump, really, except that it needs to handle paper and poo.

Or, as in the case of my Mom, once the dementia started really kicking in, her diapers.  Needless to say, that material exceeded specifications.  But that's what the big hatch on the side is for.

What has been seen cannot be unseen.
 
2014-06-04 01:24:33 PM

probesport: loaba: probesport: loaba: With 3 kids, it's imperative that the disgusting spawn have they're own bathroom. Kids are filthy.

I have 2 kids, never got into the filth thing luckily we have been just fine with 1 bath.

We're a family of 5 - keeping things clean can be a challenge.

It must be that one extra that destroys everything. But my kids are older now 10 and 13, cleaning has been part of their chores since they could walk.


Well you must have the two exceptions - we've got a 2-yr old boy and a 5-yr old bag-lady. Neither one is the least bit interested in clean-up time, which is a funny thing because the 5-yr old will happily sing "clean up/clean up/ everybody does their share". Our 11-yr old man-boy has no concept of cleaning up after himself.

/and they all wonder why Dad gives 'em the evil eye...
 
2014-06-04 01:25:44 PM
First off, the kitchen is the most expensive room in the house. That being said, three bathrooms is good for a decent sized two story house. One downstairs, one off the master bedroom and one more to be shared by the rest of the upstais. As anyone who has teenagers knows, you don't want to be waiting on one when you need to take your morning dump.
 
2014-06-04 01:33:55 PM

ReapTheChaos: First off, the kitchen is the most expensive room in the house. That being said, three bathrooms is good for a decent sized two story house. One downstairs, one off the master bedroom and one more to be shared by the rest of the upstais. As anyone who has teenagers knows, you don't want to be waiting on one when you need to take your morning dump.


that's when i run over to cleveland's house.
what's that? he moved back to quahog?
dammit!
 
2014-06-04 01:39:07 PM

sethen320: FTA: " Danielle points out that most of the people buying houses in the States are doing it with cash, so we are talking mostly about the 1% driving the single family house market these days..."


Forget the bathrooms, that statement warrants an article by itself.


You don't have to be in the 1% to pay cash for a house. Last year I sold my almost-paid-off big house in the city and bought a smaller house in the country. I had enough equity in the old house to pay cash for the new one. We baby boomers are starting to retire, and I would imagine a lot of us are downsizing our houses now that the kids are gone.
 
2014-06-04 01:46:52 PM
I have my own bathroom which adjoins to the guest bedroom I use in the morning. That's the one thing I miss the most when out of town family members come and stay!
 
2014-06-04 02:06:54 PM

probesport: Most expensive room in the house is subjective based on what you do.

Kitchen, can be done cheaply with $200 appliances or for 10s of thousands with the right stuff.

Living room, if thats your entertainment space the dollars can add up rapidly

Foyer, again dressed out can be costly

Garage, can equal the cost of the house if you are a car collector / mechanic

Bathroom, it can get up there but third in line from my view.

For me, the cheapest rooms in the house are bedrooms.

Here is my personal ranking from most expensive to cheapest.

Garage
Kitchen
Living Room
Bathroom
Foyer
Bedrooms
Pantry


No way is the garage typically the most expensive place in a house - either from the perspective of construction or ongoing expense.  As big as it can be, it's usually concrete floor, no support beams, no plumbing, no appliances.  It consumes very little energy, as it's usually unheated, and lit sparingly and infrequently.

It's essentially a shed attached to a house.
 
2014-06-04 02:22:13 PM

Hagbardr: One communal bath house per block for shiats and showers. Used milk jugs when you need to piss.


I prefer the orange juice bottles, they have a big enough opening for me.
 
2014-06-04 02:23:01 PM

Babwa Wawa: probesport: Most expensive room in the house is subjective based on what you do.

Kitchen, can be done cheaply with $200 appliances or for 10s of thousands with the right stuff.

Living room, if thats your entertainment space the dollars can add up rapidly

Foyer, again dressed out can be costly

Garage, can equal the cost of the house if you are a car collector / mechanic

Bathroom, it can get up there but third in line from my view.

For me, the cheapest rooms in the house are bedrooms.

Here is my personal ranking from most expensive to cheapest.

Garage
Kitchen
Living Room
Bathroom
Foyer
Bedrooms
Pantry

No way is the garage typically the most expensive place in a house - either from the perspective of construction or ongoing expense.  As big as it can be, it's usually concrete floor, no support beams, no plumbing, no appliances.  It consumes very little energy, as it's usually unheated, and lit sparingly and infrequently.

It's essentially a shed attached to a house.


You obviously don't have the same garage I do.  Nor do you seem to appreciate cars.
 
2014-06-04 02:25:15 PM

Babwa Wawa: No way is the garage typically the most expensive place in a house - either from the perspective of construction or ongoing expense.  As big as it can be, it's usually concrete floor, no support beams, no plumbing, no appliances.  It consumes very little energy, as it's usually unheated, and lit sparingly and infrequently.

It's essentially a shed attached to a house.


My personal ranking, not yours.

Mine is cinderblock, detached, with shop area, 100amp service, heated, air conditioned, floor drains, 30' ceiling, plumbed for water and air, 6 rows of fluorescent lighting, factory style steel tilt windows, formica countertops, mucho cabinets and storage and thats just the construction aspect.

Also the concrete used has to have specific rating to handle a lift.
 
2014-06-04 02:38:02 PM

probesport: Also the concrete used has to have specific rating to handle a lift.


rohar: You obviously don't have the same garage I do.  Nor do you seem to appreciate cars.


A residential garage is a place to put your car to protect it from the elements.  Most people would call what you both are describing a "shop".
 
2014-06-04 02:40:57 PM

Babwa Wawa: probesport: Also the concrete used has to have specific rating to handle a lift.

rohar: You obviously don't have the same garage I do.  Nor do you seem to appreciate cars.

A residential garage is a place to put your car to protect it from the elements.  Most people would call what you both are describing a "shop".


I call mine a temple.  3500 SqFt on the first floor, we don't want to discuss the second floor.
 
2014-06-04 02:44:20 PM

Babwa Wawa: probesport: Also the concrete used has to have specific rating to handle a lift.

rohar: You obviously don't have the same garage I do.  Nor do you seem to appreciate cars.

A residential garage is a place to put your car to protect it from the elements.  Most people would call what you both are describing a "shop".


Hey its a better hobby then just shiatting in different places in your house.

rohar: I call mine a temple.  3500 SqFt on the first floor, we don't want to discuss the second floor.


I refer to that as the loft. A clean room and a place for gearheads to crash during late night projects.
 
2014-06-04 03:10:15 PM

probesport: I refer to that as the loft. A clean room and a place for gearheads to crash during late night projects.


Amateur.  We generally fall asleep under the cars we're working on due to inebriation.  The floor heating almost guarantees the result.  Waking up sucks though, you forget where you fell asleep and your reaction is to sit up.  There are numerous transmission dents on my forehead.
 
2014-06-04 03:30:51 PM

rohar: probesport: I refer to that as the loft. A clean room and a place for gearheads to crash during late night projects.

Amateur.  We generally fall asleep under the cars we're working on due to inebriation.  The floor heating almost guarantees the result.  Waking up sucks though, you forget where you fell asleep and your reaction is to sit up.  There are numerous transmission dents on my forehead.


Just feeling the effects of 20 years of wrenching, I have come to welcome a good nights sleep.
 
2014-06-04 04:11:04 PM

Prank Call of Cthulhu: I guess you need extra toilets too if you're breeding spastic dorks that have to be strapped in to do their business.
[i.imgur.com image 519x960]


This cracks me the fark up every time I see it.
 
2014-06-04 04:31:16 PM
My wife and I shower in the master bathroom but I use the guest bathroom for everything else (unless there are guests). If we ever had to share a toilet again it would end in death or divorce.

We also have a powder room downstairs which we could easily live without but I doubt it would have saved much in construction costs and it would be a huge negative for resale.
 
2014-06-04 04:48:54 PM

hej: Crudbucket: We just moved into a new apartment and the bathrooms are carpeted. I don't farking get it.

It helps insure all the stray urine sprinkles get extra fermented over time.


My grandmothers house had carpeted bathrooms. She also liked to put those big fuzzy covers on the toilet lid, so the lid and the seat never stayed up on their own. You'd have to stand there, slightly hunched over the toilet with one hand holding the seat up and the other aiming the nozzle.
 
2014-06-04 05:57:33 PM
Just popped back in to say thanks for the responses re: the basement sewage pumps.


Really never thought I'd say that but here we are.
 
2014-06-04 07:52:55 PM

Buster 49: Does a window count as a toilet?


It does in parts of Africa

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flying_toilet
 
2014-06-04 09:15:44 PM

lokis_mentor: Subby obviously doesnt have 3 daughters.  You don't want them anywhere near your throne.


That. Women and bathrooms are like cats and litterboxes - experts recommend one per critter (or cooter, as you may prefer) and then one extra.
 
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