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(TreeHugger)   Bathrooms are the most expensive rooms in the house, do you really need three?   (treehugger.com) divider line 172
    More: Unlikely, Kohler  
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4894 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Jun 2014 at 8:35 AM (21 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-06-04 10:41:42 AM  
I don't know what they used as a benchmark.  But it seems pretty obvious to me that the kitchen is FAR more expensive.

Anyway...  We have 2 full baths, and one half.  The 2 fulls are actually VERY convenient for 2 reasons.  1, when guests are over.  2, that one has a tub, where the other only has a shower.  So they both get used.  The half is necessary because it's downstairs.  And it's the only one with a fan.  For many reasons it is the one that is the most used.
 
2014-06-04 10:43:36 AM  

Elfich: Actually the bath and kitchen are a coin toss as to which is more expensive. Normally the appliances are not part of the construction cost, they are by definition a non-permanent part of the building.

That leaves electrical, hvac, plumbing and gas. Depending on the size of the two rooms I would say that a cramped bathroom would give any kitchen a run for its money.


If going that route, There is considerably more plumbing, electrical and gas needs in a kitchen as well as storage, flooring, etc. Avg kitchen versus avg bath is probably still double.
 
2014-06-04 10:43:57 AM  

Rigby-Reardon: My thoughts on the matter are that you need one toilet per floor +1 for main bedroom. Most houses in my area have finished basements. That means a 1 story house should have 3 toilets. However almost all new construction is two story houses (cheaper per sq ft than 1story) which means 4 toilets.

I don't care if the toilet is in a half bath, three quarter bath, or full bath (with a family I would recommend 2 showers at least).

I think we can all agree 1/4 baths are disgusting. Wash your damn hands!


This might sound like a silly question, but exactly how would you put a toilet in the basement?  Assuming it's below the drains, which it would be, you would require a pump to get the water out of there.  And that's not exactly easy considering the stuff that goes through a toilet.
 
2014-06-04 10:44:30 AM  

Rigby-Reardon: adm_crunch: By the time I'm done with my luxury master bath remodel, it will be the most expensive room in the house. Doing it myself, so I'm saving thousands. Even then, it's gonna be north of $10K. Would probably have been 25-30K if I'd hired a pro.

Just cabinets, countertops, and flooring on a small kitchen would be more than 10,000. That does not include anything else.


Yeah, when we did our kitchen remodel we were pretty "light" - no custom cabinets, we just resurfaced them ourselves. Cabinetry is wicked expensive. New linoleum floors*,  countertops, backsplash and electrical (old house, replaced the wiring and added under-cabinet lights) was about $20k.

*not actually linoleum, but something similar that's "eco-friendly". Can't remember what it's called. We preferred that over tile, it's easier on our feet when you're standing on it for a long time, and easy to clean. It's just not in fashion. Everyone wants tile/slate/etc
 
2014-06-04 10:45:20 AM  

doglover: doglover: Trailltrader: If bathrooms are the most expensive in the house then someone can't do math.

If your bathroom ISN'T the most expensive room in the house, you're doing it wrong.

[4.bp.blogspot.com image 450x566]

You see that? Those are diamonds.

Tywin Lannister is derisively said to shiat gold by his detractors. Whether he does or doesn't, I still want a toilet he'd be willing to use. Any old fire will cook food, and a fridge just has to be cold, but a toilet is a man's throne.


Damn you have to be more careful logging in and out of your alts.  I know you are just a troll/satirist but it's getting really sloppy lately.
 
2014-06-04 10:46:40 AM  
Bath " ROOM " ?www.nerdtests.comwww.flushtv.comwww.rotorama.comfc07.deviantart.net
 
2014-06-04 10:47:35 AM  

SFSailor: StopLurkListen: I'm taking notes. Our two bathrooms are at least 30 years past their useful life. The grout is disintegrating, the pipes are failing, and in general lots of stuff I won't be able to afford to fix :/

Careful.  I've done one and a half of those (one half measure to stop the onslaught of time; one full redo), and "we can reskin / renew" *quickly* becomes, "Crap.  We have to gut the whole thing and replace *everything*."

And if your grout is failing / unmaintained, your mold problem may be enormous.

Good luck!


Sigh. Yeah, I know ... Gutting is almost guaranteed. Thanks!
 
2014-06-04 10:50:03 AM  
The house I'm buying has two. One for me and one for him. Because without fail, right before I need to leave for work (and need to pee before I go) he's in there taking a dump.
 
2014-06-04 10:51:06 AM  

hasty ambush: AverageAmericanGuy: One off the living room (for guests). One connected to the master bedroom. One for general use at the other end of the upstairs hall.

That's the bare minimum, unless you live in a studio apartment the size of a shoebox.

You'd also want one in the garage, if possible. And one connected to the guest bedroom for their privacy.

So 5 bathrooms are needed as a minimum for a typical home. I'm not sure why anyone's trying to insinuate that having three is somehow wasteful.

I am not sure why anyone is trying to dictate how many bathrooms somebody should be allowed to have.


The same type of extremists that prattle on about the evils of property rights and admonish people for owning a truck or having grass in their yard.
 
2014-06-04 10:52:44 AM  

StopLurkListen: I'm taking notes. Our two bathrooms are at least 30 years past their useful life. The grout is disintegrating, the pipes are failing, and in general lots of stuff I won't be able to afford to fix :/


Do the work yourself....it won't be that expensive.
 
2014-06-04 10:52:53 AM  
we have 3 bedrooms (master for my wife and me, and each kid has their own) and 2 full bathrooms. each bathroom has 1 sink, 1 toilet, 1 tub, and the master has a separate shower as well, and the master tub is a garden tub, or whatever you call those gigantic things built into the corner.

this is plenty for us 4.

when we have guests, there's never a problem.

if you want more bathrooms, great. i would love a urinal in my outside building when i eventually get one. the building will be a music/hangout room
 
2014-06-04 10:54:06 AM  

StopLurkListen: SFSailor: StopLurkListen: I'm taking notes. Our two bathrooms are at least 30 years past their useful life. The grout is disintegrating, the pipes are failing, and in general lots of stuff I won't be able to afford to fix :/

Careful.  I've done one and a half of those (one half measure to stop the onslaught of time; one full redo), and "we can reskin / renew" *quickly* becomes, "Crap.  We have to gut the whole thing and replace *everything*."

And if your grout is failing / unmaintained, your mold problem may be enormous.

Good luck!

Sigh. Yeah, I know ... Gutting is almost guaranteed. Thanks!


Full gutting can be faster, cheaper and easier in most cases.
 
2014-06-04 11:00:33 AM  

WGJ: It just ain't right for a man to shiat inside his own house.


Really?

I hate shiatting anywhere but on my own toilet.  I've got 3 and I almost always use one in particular.  I can see the TV from it if I leave the door open and I always take the remote with me.  I live in fear that someday disaster will strike and the remote will fall in the toilet.  How will I change the channel if that happens?
 
2014-06-04 11:02:58 AM  

wxboy: "Need" is a big word.  Does anyone really need a dishwasher?  Or a garage?


You're goddamn right they're needed.
 
2014-06-04 11:08:25 AM  

durbnpoisn


This might sound like a silly question, but exactly how would you put a toilet in the basement? Assuming it's below the drains, which it would be, you would require a pump to get the water out of there. And that's not exactly easy considering the stuff that goes through a toilet.


Some houses are built with rough-ins in the basement to facilitate building a bathroom later. It would be pretty easy to install a toilet (properly) in such a place.

And your assumption is not correct. :-) Even in my previous house (early 20th century) the drains and sewer lines were below basement level.
 
2014-06-04 11:09:03 AM  

gfid: WGJ: It just ain't right for a man to shiat inside his own house.

Really?

I hate shiatting anywhere but on my own toilet.  I've got 3 and I almost always use one in particular.  I can see the TV from it if I leave the door open and I always take the remote with me.  I live in fear that someday disaster will strike and the remote will fall in the toilet.  How will I change the channel if that happens?


You should really reevalute your diet.
 
2014-06-04 11:10:43 AM  

durbnpoisn: Rigby-Reardon: My thoughts on the matter are that you need one toilet per floor +1 for main bedroom. Most houses in my area have finished basements. That means a 1 story house should have 3 toilets. However almost all new construction is two story houses (cheaper per sq ft than 1story) which means 4 toilets.

I don't care if the toilet is in a half bath, three quarter bath, or full bath (with a family I would recommend 2 showers at least).

I think we can all agree 1/4 baths are disgusting. Wash your damn hands!

This might sound like a silly question, but exactly how would you put a toilet in the basement?  Assuming it's below the drains, which it would be, you would require a pump to get the water out of there.  And that's not exactly easy considering the stuff that goes through a toilet.


In most houses built with basements the main drain leaves below the basement floor, so no pump is needed. If you happen to live in an area where the basement is deeper than the city sewer lines you can get a pump system to pump up to the drains (there are pumps that are capable of pumping concrete during construction, there are plenty that can handle some crap).

The lowest spot in my house is 10' below ground and the drain still goes out under the floor. The house is on a hill though.
 
2014-06-04 11:11:03 AM  

durbnpoisn: This might sound like a silly question, but exactly how would you put a toilet in the basement?  Assuming it's below the drains, which it would be, you would require a pump to get the water out of there.  And that's not exactly easy considering the stuff that goes through a toilet.


Sewage sump and solids-passing sump pump.  Way more disgusting than it even sounds, if you can believe it.  I have one in the basement (can only guess why, thinking an unnecessary "maintain headroom!" goal at some point?) and it's on the list of things that need to go.  But it's possible.

StopLurkListen: Sigh. Yeah, I know ... Gutting is almost guaranteed. Thanks!


Gutting is just the start.  Depending on age, quality of construction and the wrath of time, you might have structure work to do, too.  Ahhh, scope creep.

But!  At least when it's done, you'll know it's right.  And that the mold is gone.  For now.

probesport: Full gutting can be faster, cheaper and easier in most cases.


I don't know if I'd agree with "most," but certainly some, and it depends on what needs to be addressed.  It really is a U-shaped curve, though, isn't it?  A quick refresh can be cheap and easy, but at some point "repair" is just more trouble and fidgety ass-pain than "gut it, and start over."  Maybe "as soon as you want to move plumbing" is the break point?
 
2014-06-04 11:12:30 AM  

Trailltrader: If bathrooms are the most expensive in the house then someone can't do math.  Add up the price of the refrigerator, the stove, the microwave, the cabinets, the vent over the stove, and someone failed basic math in the 7th grade as compared to a sink, a toilet and a bath/shower.


I bought a house last year; the upstairs bathroom basin and faucet together cost the previous owner $5200 (according to him), and that's not even considering the fancy toilet and shower they put in - I found the toilet on Kohler's website and by itself it starts at over $1000.  They must have run out of money at that point though, because they self-installed cheap wood laminate flooring and cut the edges all wrong.

I would never spend that kind of money on a bathroom, but I guess some people do.
 
2014-06-04 11:13:31 AM  

durbnpoisn: Rigby-Reardon: My thoughts on the matter are that you need one toilet per floor +1 for main bedroom. Most houses in my area have finished basements. That means a 1 story house should have 3 toilets. However almost all new construction is two story houses (cheaper per sq ft than 1story) which means 4 toilets.

I don't care if the toilet is in a half bath, three quarter bath, or full bath (with a family I would recommend 2 showers at least).

I think we can all agree 1/4 baths are disgusting. Wash your damn hands!

This might sound like a silly question, but exactly how would you put a toilet in the basement?  Assuming it's below the drains, which it would be, you would require a pump to get the water out of there.  And that's not exactly easy considering the stuff that goes through a toilet.


I can't speak for everyone obviously, but my house is built partially on a hill, and the foundation is build so that the main level floor is at least 2-3' higher than ground level at the back of the house and closer to 4' near the front so my basement isn't exactly that much further down.  The main plumbing stack goes all the way down.  I'd be willing to wager that any house with a working bathroom in the basement had it stubbed out from the beginning and the main stack went all the way down there to begin with (exit from the house lower than the point it needed to be for the basement to go into it).  Unless people just had a shiatload of money to redo all that plumbing.  Thinking about it, it has to be done this way if you want water for anything in the basement.  Sinks, laundry, etc.
 
2014-06-04 11:21:33 AM  

probesport: You should really reevalute your diet.


Why?

I had a ham sandwich and carne asada for breakfast.

Now I'm drinking a beer.

WTF have you eaten today?
 
2014-06-04 11:22:08 AM  
Yo I heard you are on the go and you gotta go while you go on the go.

www.digitaltrends.com

Can't never outweird the Asian girls.
 
2014-06-04 11:23:11 AM  

gfid: probesport: You should really reevalute your diet.

Why?

I had a ham sandwich and carne asada for breakfast.

Now I'm drinking a beer.

WTF have you eaten today?


Its only 11:22 here, I've had a banana. But my comment was if you are spending that much time on the toilet then you may have other issues.
 
2014-06-04 11:27:28 AM  
As long as you have a 5-gallon bucket and a toilet seat, EVERY room's a bathroom!

\you're welcome
 
2014-06-04 11:32:56 AM  

probesport: Its only 11:22 here, I've had a banana. But my comment was if you are spending that much time on the toilet then you may have other issues.


Okay.  Except I didn't say how much time I spent shiatting.  I just like to watch TV and shiat on my own toilet in my own home when I shiat.

Some people read while they shiat.

Other people play with their phones.

Some people even talk on their phones.

I suppose there are even people who sit there and stare at the walls.

I can watch TV, so I do.
 
2014-06-04 11:36:07 AM  

probesport: gfid: probesport: You should really reevalute your diet.

Why?

I had a ham sandwich and carne asada for breakfast.

Now I'm drinking a beer.

WTF have you eaten today?

Its only 11:22 here, I've had a banana. But my comment was if you are spending that much time on the toilet then you may have other issues.


central time zone here...10:30...been up since 4:45. i've had potatoes/sausage/scrambled eggs for breakfast, and a banana and 2 carrots for mid-morning snacks, along with a large travel mug of coffee, and about 1.5 quarts of water. by the end of the day i will have eaten some sort of beans or peas, and another banana, along with whatever else i eat...and probably at least 1/2 pot more of coffee. anyone who spends THAT much time on the terlet needs more fiber and water...and coffee tends to loosen the bowels as well. i'm typically in and out in under 3 minutes, 2 to 3 times per day. i pee about once an hour.

/tmi?
//maybe
///actually, wftmi
 
2014-06-04 11:37:59 AM  

Cygnus God of Balance: The article doesn't quantify how bathrooms are "the most expensive room in the house" Cost of construction? Maintenance/upkeep, water?  I don't get it - as someone pointed out, the kitchen is WAY more expensive.  At any rate, I suppose the "tree hugger" author is probably a "if it's yellow let it mellow" type - I knew one of those once - freakin GROSS.

I found the linked account of 43% of new home buyers using cash more intriguing.


If it's yellow, drink more water 'cause you're dehydrated.
 
2014-06-04 11:40:14 AM  

kitsuneymg: Cygnus God of Balance: The article doesn't quantify how bathrooms are "the most expensive room in the house" Cost of construction? Maintenance/upkeep, water?  I don't get it - as someone pointed out, the kitchen is WAY more expensive.  At any rate, I suppose the "tree hugger" author is probably a "if it's yellow let it mellow" type - I knew one of those once - freakin GROSS.

I found the linked account of 43% of new home buyers using cash more intriguing.

If it's yellow, drink more water 'cause you're dehydrated.


Or you take alot of vitamins.
 
2014-06-04 11:54:07 AM  

Slackfumasta: Trailltrader: If bathrooms are the most expensive in the house then someone can't do math.  Add up the price of the refrigerator, the stove, the microwave, the cabinets, the vent over the stove, and someone failed basic math in the 7th grade as compared to a sink, a toilet and a bath/shower.

I bought a house last year; the upstairs bathroom basin and faucet together cost the previous owner $5200 (according to him), and that's not even considering the fancy toilet and shower they put in - I found the toilet on Kohler's website and by itself it starts at over $1000.  They must have run out of money at that point though, because they self-installed cheap wood laminate flooring and cut the edges all wrong.

I would never spend that kind of money on a bathroom, but I guess some people do.


That sounds high, but remodeling a kitchen can easily go 40-50k, cabinets are farking expensive, I spent more on cabinets (and I got the relatively cheap ones) than I did on appliances and granite combined.
 
2014-06-04 11:54:31 AM  
Lived with one bathroom most of my life.

Saw a two-bedroom townhouse several years ago with two full baths and two half-baths.  Times have changed.
 
2014-06-04 11:58:44 AM  

bungle_jr: probesport: gfid: probesport: You should really reevalute your diet.

Why?

I had a ham sandwich and carne asada for breakfast.

Now I'm drinking a beer.

WTF have you eaten today?

Its only 11:22 here, I've had a banana. But my comment was if you are spending that much time on the toilet then you may have other issues.

central time zone here...10:30...been up since 4:45. i've had potatoes/sausage/scrambled eggs for breakfast, and a banana and 2 carrots for mid-morning snacks, along with a large travel mug of coffee, and about 1.5 quarts of water. by the end of the day i will have eaten some sort of beans or peas, and another banana, along with whatever else i eat...and probably at least 1/2 pot more of coffee. anyone who spends THAT much time on the terlet needs more fiber and water...and coffee tends to loosen the bowels as well. i'm typically in and out in under 3 minutes, 2 to 3 times per day. i pee about once an hour.

/tmi?
//maybe
///actually, wftmi


POOP THREAD!
 
2014-06-04 12:01:43 PM  
Baths and Kitchens are easily the most expensive rooms in the house.

As for number of baths required, that depends on your family size (or if you even have a family at all.) Typically, over say the last 30 years or so, you're going to have 2 full baths (tub/shower combo, pisser and sink) and probably at least one quarter bath (sink and pisser.) Extra points are awarded for a what is called a half-bath (shower stall, sink and pisser) and you're off the charts if your master has an ensuite (that's the big farker with a full shower and and a big-ass tub and room for farking easy chairs.)

Growing up, we had a 2 fulls and a quarter bath. Since I moved to New Mexico, we've never had more than two baths in our older homes. With 3 kids, it's imperative that the disgusting spawn have they're own bathroom. Kids are filthy.
 
2014-06-04 12:02:29 PM  
I do need a new bathroom, my place was built in 79-80 and previous owners half assed some repairs on the tile and it got worse. I had to spend my renovation money on other plumbing repairs, but I hope to soon have a new bathroom. It would be nice if I had two but my roomate would claim one fill it full of her garbage and take over the other. The only problem I have had sharing a bathroom with females was when my roomate and a bunch of her friends were getting ready for a wedding. I almost had to pee in the back yard, stupid girls.
 
2014-06-04 12:02:48 PM  

probesport: kitsuneymg: Cygnus God of Balance: The article doesn't quantify how bathrooms are "the most expensive room in the house" Cost of construction? Maintenance/upkeep, water?  I don't get it - as someone pointed out, the kitchen is WAY more expensive.  At any rate, I suppose the "tree hugger" author is probably a "if it's yellow let it mellow" type - I knew one of those once - freakin GROSS.

I found the linked account of 43% of new home buyers using cash more intriguing.

If it's yellow, drink more water 'cause you're dehydrated.

Or you take alot of vitamins.


or drink a lot of things besides just plain water
mine is often yellowish. i drink more water than most folks, plus coffee, and sometimes a soda, milk, juice, whatever. very rarely is it actually completely clear
 
2014-06-04 12:09:21 PM  

loaba: Baths and Kitchens are easily the most expensive rooms in the house.

As for number of baths required, that depends on your family size (or if you even have a family at all.) Typically, over say the last 30 years or so, you're going to have 2 full baths (tub/shower combo, pisser and sink) and probably at least one quarter bath (sink and pisser.) Extra points are awarded for a what is called a half-bath (shower stall, sink and pisser) and you're off the charts if your master has an ensuite (that's the big farker with a full shower and and a big-ass tub and room for farking easy chairs.)

Growing up, we had a 2 fulls and a quarter bath. Since I moved to New Mexico, we've never had more than two baths in our older homes. With 3 kids, it's imperative that the disgusting spawn have they're own bathroom. Kids are filthy.


Your count is wrong. Each fixture is a quarter. Sink, toilet, shower, tub. Now a tub can have a shower in it or you can have a separate tub and shower.
1/4 bath = toilet only
1/2 bath = toilet& sink
3/4 bath = toilet , sink, & shower stall
Full bath = toilet, sink, tub & shower
 
2014-06-04 12:09:49 PM  
Does the toilet on my front porch count as a bathroom?
 
2014-06-04 12:10:04 PM  

on the road: Lived with one bathroom most of my life.

Saw a two-bedroom townhouse several years ago with two full baths and two half-baths.  Times have changed.


For singles or childless couples, one bath is fine. Add in filthy spawn and it sucks. Not to say you're 3rd-world or anything, with just one bath, but it's nice when the kids have their own filth-zone.

Generally, older homes from the 50's are going to be smaller and only have one bath. Gawd, how it would be nice to not need so much space.
 
2014-06-04 12:18:57 PM  
Most expensive room in my house has always been my office.

Every time I get an office space at home, we have another kid.  Know what it costs to raise a kid until they are 18 these days?
 
2014-06-04 12:23:53 PM  

i.r.id10t: Most expensive room in my house has always been my office.

Every time I get an office space at home, we have another kid.  Know what it costs to raise a kid until they are 18 these days?


A farking boat-load of cash. And for all you singles, don't even give me that tax rebate shiate. Spawning costs money. Lots of it.
 
2014-06-04 12:26:11 PM  

loaba: With 3 kids, it's imperative that the disgusting spawn have they're own bathroom. Kids are filthy.


I have 2 kids, never got into the filth thing luckily we have been just fine with 1 bath.
 
2014-06-04 12:28:45 PM  

probesport: loaba: With 3 kids, it's imperative that the disgusting spawn have they're own bathroom. Kids are filthy.

I have 2 kids, never got into the filth thing luckily we have been just fine with 1 bath.


We're a family of 5 - keeping things clean can be a challenge.
 
2014-06-04 12:29:40 PM  

Englebert Slaptyback: durbnpoisn

This might sound like a silly question, but exactly how would you put a toilet in the basement? Assuming it's below the drains, which it would be, you would require a pump to get the water out of there. And that's not exactly easy considering the stuff that goes through a toilet.


Some houses are built with rough-ins in the basement to facilitate building a bathroom later. It would be pretty easy to install a toilet (properly) in such a place.

And your assumption is not correct. :-) Even in my previous house (early 20th century) the drains and sewer lines were below basement level.


Well, that's not always true, especially in areas where the water table is close to the surface.  Then you need one of these:

ep.yimg.com
 
2014-06-04 12:44:25 PM  
I don't get the "Master bathroom". I'm fine sharing with family, at least my immediate family. It feels like conspicuous consumption to me to have your own bathroom.

At least 1-1/2 is a must, though. Two people and one bathroom requires calling "dibs" on the way home from somewhere. The old apartment with one was a pain, but the new place has 2-1/2 in a good arrangement, one on each floor including the basement. Not having to line up or roam the house is nice.

We still can't shower in both at the same time, but that's due to old plumbing full of 90º elbows and done in 1/2" copper right from the meter. You have to run 3/4" or 1", depending on materials, around the house to avoid the pressure drop of multiple taps being used at once. You'd be surprised what good plumbing does, and I'm going to put in modern temperature balancing fixtures in the showers as well to avoid all surprises.

I find 1/2" in all kinds of older houses, and it bothers me. It may have been cheaper, but they always used so many unnecessary 90º elbows that they didn't save much by the end of it. Even worse are the places with 1/4" pipe sections twisting around through the joists; I've seen water trickle out of faucets not due to lack of pressure, just too little flow left.
 
2014-06-04 12:48:23 PM  

Deucednuisance


Well, that's not always true, especially in areas where the water table is close to the surface. Then you need one of these:


That's a fair point; I should have allowed for some exceptions. You bastard. ;-)

However, I have to ask: how many locations might there be where the water table is low enough to make a basement feasible but high enough to make below-basement-level sewage infeasible? Honest question, btw. Unless the basement is waterproofed exceedingly well this looks like an invitation to headache.

Or is it intended more as a retrofit where someone wants a basement bathroom and a new sewer line would be prohibitively expensive?
 
2014-06-04 12:51:04 PM  

loaba: probesport: loaba: With 3 kids, it's imperative that the disgusting spawn have they're own bathroom. Kids are filthy.

I have 2 kids, never got into the filth thing luckily we have been just fine with 1 bath.

We're a family of 5 - keeping things clean can be a challenge.


It must be that one extra that destroys everything. But my kids are older now 10 and 13, cleaning has been part of their chores since they could walk.
 
2014-06-04 12:55:48 PM  

Englebert Slaptyback: Deucednuisance

Well, that's not always true, especially in areas where the water table is close to the surface. Then you need one of these:


That's a fair point; I should have allowed for some exceptions. You bastard. ;-)

However, I have to ask: how many locations might there be where the water table is low enough to make a basement feasible but high enough to make below-basement-level sewage infeasible? Honest question, btw. Unless the basement is waterproofed exceedingly well this looks like an invitation to headache.

Or is it intended more as a retrofit where someone wants a basement bathroom and a new sewer line would be prohibitively expensive?


My 1920 house sewer drain is about a foot off the basement floor. Macerator and pump are my only options for downstairs. I am fairly certain my house was not originally built with a bathroom as it was a farm hand house.
 
2014-06-04 12:56:54 PM  
Heh. My dad's parents raised eight kids with an outhouse. (Actually, I think they had a double, and they might have gotten indoor plumbing before the last kid came along.)

We grew up in a house with two adults, two boys and one bath, and it really wasn't okay -- it was great when we moved up to two baths.

Now, we've got two adults, two kids and three baths, and there's rarely a day goes by that we don't have all three occupied for at least half an hour or so. We could make do with less, but we're grateful that we don't have to.
 
2014-06-04 01:05:35 PM  

Englebert Slaptyback: Deucednuisance

Well, that's not always true, especially in areas where the water table is close to the surface. Then you need one of these:


That's a fair point; I should have allowed for some exceptions. You bastard. ;-)

However, I have to ask: how many locations might there be where the water table is low enough to make a basement feasible but high enough to make below-basement-level sewage infeasible? Honest question, btw. Unless the basement is waterproofed exceedingly well this looks like an invitation to headache.

Or is it intended more as a retrofit where someone wants a basement bathroom and a new sewer line would be prohibitively expensive?


Very common for houses with septic tanks on a level lot to have the sewage leaving several feet above the basement floor - otherwise the septic tank needs to be buried fairly far below the surface, creating a pain when it needs to be pumped.  I've lived in six houses with septic tanks (three on sloped lots with walk-out basements), and only two have had the sewage depart through the basement floor.

Fortunately, my current house has the existing plumbing exiting through the floor, so putting a terlet down there is a feasible option (whenever I finally get around to finishing it, which probably won't be for a while, if ever).
 
2014-06-04 01:07:15 PM  

Englebert Slaptyback: Deucednuisance

Well, that's not always true, especially in areas where the water table is close to the surface. Then you need one of these:


That's a fair point; I should have allowed for some exceptions. You bastard. ;-)

However, I have to ask: how many locations might there be where the water table is low enough to make a basement feasible but high enough to make below-basement-level sewage infeasible? Honest question, btw. Unless the basement is waterproofed exceedingly well this looks like an invitation to headache.

Or is it intended more as a retrofit where someone wants a basement bathroom and a new sewer line would be prohibitively expensive?


It is not just for a case of low water table. If your basement is downhill from the street and you are hooking up to city sewer you may need to pump sewage up hill to the city sewer.
 
2014-06-04 01:11:13 PM  

AverageAmericanGuy: One off the living room (for guests). One connected to the master bedroom. One for general use at the other end of the upstairs hall.

That's the bare minimum, unless you live in a studio apartment the size of a shoebox.

You'd also want one in the garage, if possible. And one connected to the guest bedroom for their privacy.

So 5 bathrooms are needed as a minimum for a typical home. I'm not sure why anyone's trying to insinuate that having three is somehow wasteful.


9 of us shared 2 bathrooms growing up in the 50s. Nobody danced around holding themselves. Nobody's privacy was violated. No guests looked strained or embarrassed. No trail of tinkle or unexplained smells.

5 bathrooms? It isn't only politics that's gone nuts.
 
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