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(Anorak (UK))   "Here we are in 2014 and the Jetsons lifestyle still hasn't arrived. Thanks to pop culture's broken promises of delivering robot maids and whooshing Star Trek doors in a timely manner, we are all a little disappointed"   (anorak.co.uk ) divider line
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1160 clicks; posted to Geek » on 04 Jun 2014 at 4:17 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-06-04 10:55:17 AM  

devildog123: clkeagle: Hawnkee: verbaltoxin: We don't want flying cars. Most jerk-offs can't stay in the right lane but to pass. Why the hell would we want them airborne?
Oh, man. You gave me a more horrid though: Airborne rubberneckers. At that point they would probably be a threat to national security and would require being shot down.
Or here's one for you... idiots who will drink and drive in three dimensions instead of two.
We have those today.  They're called Airline pilots.


Heh... different kind of terrible.
 
2014-06-04 11:05:26 AM  

DjangoStonereaver: What you say about classic SF missing the internet and personal communication revolutions is true,
but even back in the 1940s there were a couple of predictions that were pretty eerie:

In the story A LOGIC NAMED JOE, Murray Leinster correctly predicted that given a globally searchable
database a lot of people would use it for unsavory purposes.

And THE HUDDLING PLACE (by Clifford D, Simak) predicted virtual reality (well, its more like
telepresence and video conferencing) as well as the potential that such technologies have to reinforce,
not reduce, isolation between people.


In Heinlein's SPACE CADET, written in the 40's, the protagonist produces a "pocket phone" that he uses to call his family half a world away. Unthinkable at the time.
 
2014-06-04 11:09:00 AM  

Geotpf: give me doughnuts: farkeruk: 1970 - we'd been 300,000 miles from earth.


No one has been 300,000 from Earth.
The farthest humans have gone is about half that.

The distance from the Earth to the moon is 238,900 miles.  Considering that people have orbited around the moon, when they were on the far side of it, 300,000 miles away from Earth is a good estimate.



Wow. Did I fail hard, or what? I have no idea why I though the distance to the moon was about about 100,000 miles shorter than what it is.

Sorry for the public brainfart, folks
 
2014-06-04 11:31:08 AM  
I've got plenty of star trek tech in my life, thanks subby.

Got my PADD. Got my Tricorder/communicator in my pocket. And while I can't travel at warp speed or instantly transport matter, I can skype with with my girlfriend at least as easily as Picard can talk to starfleet command.
 
2014-06-04 11:42:55 AM  

Gunboat: plcow: Self-driving cars will change the world of transportation and will probably be the biggest leap in transportation since cars went mainstream.

This.  I cannot wait for robot cars.   They'll be awesome.


I have been wondering what robot cars will do to traffic laws.

If the car drives itself, then it should not really break the law (in theory, in reality there will be errors).  No speeding tickets, no reckless operation, no parking tickets (car drops you off, parks in designated area, comes back to get you when ready).  Traffic violation revenue goes down, you don't need the number of LEO's anymore, etc...

Also, what about drug transportation?  Most people get caught on stupid moving violations when transporting drugs.  If my car can't break the law, then I could transport drugs without any fear of legal repercussions.  How will that be handled?
 
2014-06-04 11:52:14 AM  

buckler: DjangoStonereaver: What you say about classic SF missing the internet and personal communication revolutions is true,
but even back in the 1940s there were a couple of predictions that were pretty eerie:

In the story A LOGIC NAMED JOE, Murray Leinster correctly predicted that given a globally searchable
database a lot of people would use it for unsavory purposes.

And THE HUDDLING PLACE (by Clifford D, Simak) predicted virtual reality (well, its more like
telepresence and video conferencing) as well as the potential that such technologies have to reinforce,
not reduce, isolation between people.

In Heinlein's SPACE CADET, written in the 40's, the protagonist produces a "pocket phone" that he uses to call his family half a world away. Unthinkable at the time.


I'd forgotten about that one, though you do remind me that in the beginning of BETWEEN PLANETS, the
teenage protagonist had a phone built into the saddle of the horse he was riding that sounds an awful lot
like a 1980s era bagphone/carphone.

(and then there's Heinlein's prediction that the US would devolve into a theocratic dictatorship, but that's
not really technological is it?)
 
2014-06-04 11:53:53 AM  

neongoats: I've got plenty of star trek tech in my life, thanks subby.

Got my PADD. Got my Tricorder/communicator in my pocket. And while I can't travel at warp speed or instantly transport matter, I can skype with with my girlfriend at least as easily as Picard can talk to starfleet command.


What? No bluetooth headset?

www.starship-obready.org
 
2014-06-04 11:59:31 AM  

Burr: Gunboat: plcow: Self-driving cars will change the world of transportation and will probably be the biggest leap in transportation since cars went mainstream.

This.  I cannot wait for robot cars.   They'll be awesome.

I have been wondering what robot cars will do to traffic laws.

If the car drives itself, then it should not really break the law (in theory, in reality there will be errors).  No speeding tickets, no reckless operation, no parking tickets (car drops you off, parks in designated area, comes back to get you when ready).  Traffic violation revenue goes down, you don't need the number of LEO's anymore, etc...

Also, what about drug transportation?  Most people get caught on stupid moving violations when transporting drugs.  If my car can't break the law, then I could transport drugs without any fear of legal repercussions.  How will that be handled?


A lot of municipalities will be SOL when they can't rely on speed traps and parking tickets as a source of revenue.
 
2014-06-04 12:09:42 PM  

neongoats: Got my PADD. Got my Tricorder/communicator in my pocket. And while I can't travel at warp speed or instantly transport matter,


Warp speed isn't really a "prediction" of the future anyway. It's just a means to be able to tell stories about different planets. And the transporter is a sort of crappy plot device created because they couldn't afford a shuttlecraft in the first season.

And what about weapons? We have much more creative ways of killing each other than boring ass phasers and photon torpedoes.
 
2014-06-04 12:26:21 PM  

Doc Daneeka: A lot of municipalities will be SOL when they can't rely on speed traps and parking tickets as a source of revenue.


I can see extra taxes fees on licenses, titles, registration making up "some" of the revenue, but I don't think it will be anywhere close to the gold mine it is currently.

I would like to think this would lead to a smaller, more efficient police force that will increase response times, and maybe money might go into rehab, but in reality it will just pave the way for more B.S. laws  and enforcement of jaywalking and the like.
 
2014-06-04 12:51:26 PM  

frepnog: problem with wars: there will likely never be another "great war" the likes of WW2 that kills millions, unless it is nuclear in nature, and the chances of THAT are infinitesimal.

problem with plagues - Healthcare has gotten too civilized in many areas for a plague to make much headway, unless something new like the walking dead that just infects everyone comes along, and that is science fiction.

the REAL lookout is a natural disaster - but even those happen regularly, and humanity bounces back incredibly quickly. See - Katrina, Japan's recent horrors, ect.


Heh. Okay.

No big war could ever happen again, right? Yeah, we could never be that stupid. Never. No way.

Also it's not like diseases are becoming more and more antibiotic resistant. Nope, no worries there.

Last I'd like to see somebody "bounce back" from a caldera explosion.

Are all these long shots? Yeah, but the time when they happen is always the worst time to happen.

The planet's systems are fully operational and in-tact. We're just the passengers on this giant ellipsoid. We're not in control.
 
2014-06-04 12:57:23 PM  

Mad_Radhu: At some point, people are going to push back against being worked to the bone for a pittance. Something has to give soon.


Now, as opposed to any other time in recorded human history?  To be sure, there have been slave revolts in the past, but they're probably more notable by how infrequent they are.  What do you imagine is going to be the impetus to have the masses rise up against this injustice now, all of the sudden?
 
2014-06-04 12:59:26 PM  

Doc Daneeka: A lot of municipalities will be SOL when they can't rely on speed traps and parking tickets as a source of revenue.


Well, they would lose the expense of traffic police work, so it's not all a loss.
 
2014-06-04 01:03:10 PM  

verbaltoxin: frepnog: problem with wars: there will likely never be another "great war" the likes of WW2 that kills millions, unless it is nuclear in nature, and the chances of THAT are infinitesimal.

problem with plagues - Healthcare has gotten too civilized in many areas for a plague to make much headway, unless something new like the walking dead that just infects everyone comes along, and that is science fiction.

the REAL lookout is a natural disaster - but even those happen regularly, and humanity bounces back incredibly quickly. See - Katrina, Japan's recent horrors, ect.

Heh. Okay.

No big war could ever happen again, right? Yeah, we could never be that stupid. Never. No way.  (I said "likely".  No, a war like WW2 is not likely to happen.  Technology prevents the stupidity of throwing millions of soldiers at a problem, barring something really ridiculous.)

Also it's not like diseases are becoming more and more antibiotic resistant. Nope, no worries there. (Well, anything is possible, but while anything is possible, once again many things are just damned unlikely. A huge plague wiping out millions upon millions is just damned unlikely in this day and age.)

Last I'd like to see somebody "bounce back" from a caldera explosion.  (Volcanos?  Really?  Well, I guess Krakatoa could happen somewhere, belching out a cloud of death that consumes the earth.  But once again.....  is it LIKELY?)

Are all these long shots? Yeah, but the time when they happen is always the worst time to happen.

The planet's systems are fully operational and in-tact. We're just the passengers on this giant ellipsoid. We're not in control.

(Well, yeah.  You are right there.)


Truth is that our biggest concern is LIKELY to be an asteroid smacking the planet and killing us all.  But it isn't LIKELY to happen.  The sun would probably burn out first, and even if it DIDN'T, mankind would LIKELY be able to avert the disaster, given enough time to prepare.

We are some smart motherfarkers.
 
2014-06-04 01:06:21 PM  

Mad_Radhu: At some point, people are going to push back against being worked to the bone for a pittance. Something has to give soon.


Things have been going in the opposite direction though.

Labor Unions (particularly private sector unions) have been declining in membership and influence for decades, and are now probably the weakest they have been in a century.

If people were getting fed up and wanting to push back, you'd think the ranks of unions would be swelling, but the opposite is true.
 
2014-06-04 01:26:25 PM  

Doc Daneeka: Mad_Radhu: At some point, people are going to push back against being worked to the bone for a pittance. Something has to give soon.

Things have been going in the opposite direction though.

Labor Unions (particularly private sector unions) have been declining in membership and influence for decades, and are now probably the weakest they have been in a century.

If people were getting fed up and wanting to push back, you'd think the ranks of unions would be swelling, but the opposite is true.


People have been conditioned that they MUST work.  What is happening now however is people are starting to demand to be PAID decently for work, decently enough to at least LIVE.

/yes, people, the minimum wage is too goddamned low.  It hasn't kept up with inflation, and the poorest among us are suffering needlessly while the corporations they toil for make record profits.
 
2014-06-04 01:30:53 PM  

Doc Daneeka: Mad_Radhu: At some point, people are going to push back against being worked to the bone for a pittance. Something has to give soon.

Things have been going in the opposite direction though.

Labor Unions (particularly private sector unions) have been declining in membership and influence for decades, and are now probably the weakest they have been in a century.

If people were getting fed up and wanting to push back, you'd think the ranks of unions would be swelling, but the opposite is true.


Well, when unions don't actually save jobs despite the money and power they have and people don't want to pay the dues because they know they don't really get any return for the chunk of change they have to give up, it's pretty easy to see why unions aren't really working out these days.

tl:dr The idea is still awesome, but the institution itself has become largely ineffective.
 
2014-06-04 01:49:19 PM  

Skleenar: Mad_Radhu: At some point, people are going to push back against being worked to the bone for a pittance. Something has to give soon.

Now, as opposed to any other time in recorded human history?  To be sure, there have been slave revolts in the past, but they're probably more notable by how infrequent they are.  What do you imagine is going to be the impetus to have the masses rise up against this injustice now, all of the sudden?



It's really interesting actually reading up on this very point.  Asking the question, what actually happened to start a revolution?  In a minute by minute detail.  In high school history books, there is always a discussion about the pressure being built up, and then one day Poof! revolution.  Reality is never that clean.

Just in Russia alone, everybody was starving for years.  The Czar was killing people.  Police were raping people.  Life could hardly be imagined to be any worse.  And even then, people weren't revolting at first.  It is amazing the depravity that people will subject themselves to rather than dictate control over their own lives or risk dying while trying (when faced with that exact choice).

Just to provide a clean example of what I am thinking about:

1) What if someone hasn't eaten anything in 24 hours and there is a 5% chance to dying while attempting to get food?
2) What about 48 hours?
3) 48 hours and a 50% chance of dying while trying?
4) What if you have eaten and your friend hasn't?  5% chance, 50% chance?
etc.

THEN

5) What if you have food, but somebody takes away one small right to do something.  Like, own land without paying taxes, own a gun, travel between states.  etc. etc. etc.  It's amazing how many rights people will give up before they will take even a very small chance of dying while fighting for those rights.

And that's how a brave new world is created.  Give people enough food, some shelter, a social context, and some soma (tv, weed, video games, whatever).  And nobody will revolt, even if you think the wealthy are taking advantage of you.  Even if you think it's the government.  Even if you have your freedoms taken by any number of people.  Bottom line, nobody will revolt.

America is a long long long long way away from revolting. Whoever is in charge, whether it be crony capitalism, dictatorship, or whatever, most probably knows how to satisfy a population.  What I am saying has been known for thousands of years.  It never slips up until you get some (literally) insane Czar, King, dictator, etc who is so mentally ill that they can't see the revolution coming.
 
2014-06-04 02:04:18 PM  

Burr: Also, what about drug transportation?  Most people get caught on stupid moving violations when transporting drugs.  If my car can't break the law, then I could transport drugs without any fear of legal repercussions.  How will that be handled?


I would imagine the liability would fall on either the car's owner, or the person who packed the drugs and programmed its destination.
 
2014-06-04 02:10:54 PM  

plcow: America is a long long long long way away from revolting. Whoever is in charge, whether it be crony capitalism, dictatorship, or whatever, most probably knows how to satisfy a population.  What I am saying has been known for thousands of years.  It never slips up until you get some (literally) insane Czar, King, dictator, etc who is so mentally ill that they can't see the revolution coming.


To be overly optimistic, the US has a chance to have a "soft revolution" where we decide we're tired of this shiat, and want change. It can be done within the system, but we'd have to be insistent and unwavering. We've already examples before us like Ghandi and MLK. We don't have to go all French/Russian Revolution on anyone's ass. There is no King, and we're not fighting a world war like the Russians were doing.

We could change for the better. People just have to be inspired to pull themselves out of the 80+ hour work week distractions, distractions with social obligations, distractions that the status quo has put in place to keep people docile enough to remain apathetic.

We're at a point now in our history where we've never had a better opportunity to organize.
 
2014-06-04 02:26:03 PM  

Skleenar: Mad_Radhu: At some point, people are going to push back against being worked to the bone for a pittance. Something has to give soon.

Now, as opposed to any other time in recorded human history?  To be sure, there have been slave revolts in the past, but they're probably more notable by how infrequent they are.  What do you imagine is going to be the impetus to have the masses rise up against this injustice now, all of the sudden?


There were huge push backs against the status quo during the late 19th century and early 20th century because of the excesses of unfettered capitalism. It doesn't have to be a bloody revolution to make things better for the working and middle class.
 
2014-06-04 03:19:52 PM  

Doc Daneeka: Whine whine whine.

Automatic doors are common at pretty much every store. And I have a robot that cleans my home - it's called Roomba.

And think about all the stuff that SF didn't even dream of.  The internet. The smartphone.

When you think that each of us carries around a device in our pockets that can instantly put us in communication with anyone on the globe, can tell us any piece of information we want to know in instants, can pinpoint our exact location and give us detailed directions to any other location, can take pictures, record video, and give us instant access to any recorded song, published book, or movie...as well as scores of other functions.

That's some SF shiat right there that we take for granted.  A person from the 60s would be astounded.


Your average smartphone today blows away 90% of technobabble magic wish fulfillment phlebtinum from old sci-fi. How many robots or computers back then were terrible, back talking oracles? Even when you type something wrong into Google it responds back with the friendly "did you mean..." Your average smartphone user has a literal Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy in their pockets. Want to know etiquette or phrases in a foreign country? Restaurants? Reviews? Directions? GPS?

Just because we don't live on a base on the moon and eat protein pills doesn't mean things aren't astonishing. Last year my wife went to India for a month and we video talked for an hour a day, in real time at opposite ends of the earth FOR FREE.

SciFi writers lack VISION. I always think of the (Asimov, I think) robot designed as a bipedal talking, sentient being, who was used to sort a CARD CATALOG by (ungodly fast) robotic hand. It's like all the comic book villains who come up with a way to transmute matter and immediately use that ability to rob banks.
 
2014-06-04 03:29:54 PM  

Fano: Your average smartphone user has a literal Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy in their pockets


That's true, HGTTG was probably one of the best to "predict" the future, at least as far as the Guide itself went.
 
2014-06-04 04:57:11 PM  

Skleenar: Mad_Radhu: At some point, people are going to push back against being worked to the bone for a pittance. Something has to give soon.

Now, as opposed to any other time in recorded human history?  To be sure, there have been slave revolts in the past, but they're probably more notable by how infrequent they are.  What do you imagine is going to be the impetus to have the masses rise up against this injustice now, all of the sudden?


And Haiti is an example of the only successful slave revolt in history
 
2014-06-04 07:28:31 PM  
i59.tinypic.com
 
2014-06-04 08:16:20 PM  

47 is the new 42: 1.  Why would your ex gf hook you up with someone else?
2.  Why would you date somebody your ex gf hooked you up with?


1) She vanted to be left alone.

See Greta Garbo, whom she resembled.

2) There is a sort of deliciousness associated with being set up to to bang a very wealthy and hot young thing, and then not doing it, to the chagrin of the limited, smug,  wealthy community.

See Caddyshack.
 
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