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(Anorak (UK))   "Here we are in 2014 and the Jetsons lifestyle still hasn't arrived. Thanks to pop culture's broken promises of delivering robot maids and whooshing Star Trek doors in a timely manner, we are all a little disappointed"   (anorak.co.uk) divider line 76
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1125 clicks; posted to Geek » on 04 Jun 2014 at 4:17 AM (29 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-06-04 03:06:41 AM  
Why should I lament some short-sighted Baby Boomer's vision of what the future was supposed to look like? They didn't try to make that world, they doubled down on the existing one, and not only made a post-scarcity society impossible, they very likely put a time limit on how long we're going to enjoy it as a species.
 
2014-06-04 04:25:33 AM  
My cell phone has the Jetsons doorbell ringtone and I wear those plastic circle thingies around my ankles and wrists so I feel futurey.

Eep op ork ah ah
 
2014-06-04 04:51:48 AM  
I suspect this whole "article" was just an excuse to show off hot alien women from old tv-shows

/ NTTIAWWT
 
2014-06-04 05:10:24 AM  
It's a real problem of extrapolation with sci-fi.

1950 - we'd been a few miles from earth. 1960 - we'd been a few hundred miles from earth. 1970 - we'd been 300,000 miles from earth.

Space travel is simply the greatest disappointment for my generation. I remember our class getting cancelled in the early 80s and the TV being brought in so we could watch the space shuttle launch, a craft that we were told was going to mean that going to space would be like getting on a jumbo jet in a few years.

I tell you what's really jarring in sci-fi movies, though - communication technology. They've got all this stuff that we don't have like replicants, hoverboards and intelligent robots, but their communication technology looks ancient. Blade Runner has Deckard paying to make a video call to Rachel from a bar, because what someone did was extend what people did in a bar in the 80s, but with better technology. Because in the early 80s, the only people with a phone were millionaires who had them in their cars.
 
2014-06-04 05:47:33 AM  
farkeruk: Because what someone did was extend what people did in a bar in the 80s, but with better technology.

That's all most science fiction ever does.
 
2014-06-04 06:06:57 AM  

farkeruk: I tell you what's really jarring in sci-fi movies, though - communication technology.


How so? I mean, the highest bandwidth human communication is voice. So even if you go anime style of wrist-mounted holographic displays or the any-distance 'communicators' of next gen Trek, it's just a damn phone. Sure, telepathy could be a step further, but that's not something that's interesting to portray on the screen.
 
2014-06-04 06:21:29 AM  
A lot of places have the slidey open Star Trek like doors now and I've seen plans for a hoverboard you can build. Well, it's more like a hovercraft you stand on but it works.They're not flying cars, but it's something.
 
2014-06-04 06:39:26 AM  
Whine whine whine.

Automatic doors are common at pretty much every store. And I have a robot that cleans my home - it's called Roomba.

And think about all the stuff that SF didn't even dream of.  The internet. The smartphone.

When you think that each of us carries around a device in our pockets that can instantly put us in communication with anyone on the globe, can tell us any piece of information we want to know in instants, can pinpoint our exact location and give us detailed directions to any other location, can take pictures, record video, and give us instant access to any recorded song, published book, or movie...as well as scores of other functions.

That's some SF shiat right there that we take for granted.  A person from the 60s would be astounded.
 
2014-06-04 06:47:48 AM  

starsrift: farkeruk: I tell you what's really jarring in sci-fi movies, though - communication technology.

How so? I mean, the highest bandwidth human communication is voice. So even if you go anime style of wrist-mounted holographic displays or the any-distance 'communicators' of next gen Trek, it's just a damn phone. Sure, telepathy could be a step further, but that's not something that's interesting to portray on the screen.


Beneath the Planet of the Apes...
 
2014-06-04 07:01:50 AM  

Doc Daneeka: Whine whine whine.

Automatic doors are common at pretty much every store. And I have a robot that cleans my home - it's called Roomba.

And think about all the stuff that SF didn't even dream of.  The internet. The smartphone.

When you think that each of us carries around a device in our pockets that can instantly put us in communication with anyone on the globe, can tell us any piece of information we want to know in instants, can pinpoint our exact location and give us detailed directions to any other location, can take pictures, record video, and give us instant access to any recorded song, published book, or movie...as well as scores of other functions.

That's some SF shiat right there that we take for granted.  A person from the 60s would be astounded.


Ayup. I'll put my tablet up against a TOS Tricorder any day. And I still carry a clamshell cell.

...so I can wrist-flip it open.

/Person from the 60's
//More than satisfied
/// Groovy
 
2014-06-04 07:16:59 AM  
Watch TNG on an iPad.

There you have your 'flying car'.
 
2014-06-04 07:17:09 AM  

whidbey: Why should I lament some short-sighted Baby Boomer's vision of what the future was supposed to look like? They didn't try to make that world, they doubled down on the existing one, and not only made a post-scarcity society impossible, they very likely put a time limit on how long we're going to enjoy it as a species.


The Jetsons and Star Trek weren't the work of Boomers, but the generation before them.
 
2014-06-04 07:24:46 AM  

Doc Daneeka: When you think that each of us carries around a device in our pockets that can instantly put us in communication with anyone on the globe, can tell us any piece of information we want to know in instants, can pinpoint our exact location and give us detailed directions to any other location, can take pictures, record video, and give us instant access to any recorded song, published book, or movie...as well as scores of other functions


Booooring. I want a door that employs 1970s grocery store technology.

/and who really wants a flying car?
 
2014-06-04 07:31:30 AM  
My grandmother rode a horse to her first job. I can today access the entire Internet on my phone even when the power is out. I don't think we have any real room to complain.

I just hope I live long enough to see them look for life on Europa.
 
2014-06-04 07:32:52 AM  
What about the virtual worlds we have created.

We have become second level gods.  We create and destroy these worlds on a whim, with 1's and 0's, for either curiosity or profit.  With each world we become more adapt at this creation, and one day we might surpass our own world with a world we create.

And with our current technology, manual flying cars are a fools dream.  I don't trust people constrained to X and Y directions, adding a Z would just be chaos.  Lets perfect the self driving car before we worry about making flying ones.
 
2014-06-04 07:39:46 AM  
I have good news for the author. The robots are coming and they're going to take his job and do it far, far better. There'll be flying cars as well, but he'll be stuck walking from his camp under the bridge to his begging pitch.
 
2014-06-04 07:45:37 AM  

Doc Daneeka: Whine whine whine.

Automatic doors are common at pretty much every store. And I have a robot that cleans my home - it's called Roomba.

And think about all the stuff that SF didn't even dream of.  The internet. The smartphone.

When you think that each of us carries around a device in our pockets that can instantly put us in communication with anyone on the globe, can tell us any piece of information we want to know in instants, can pinpoint our exact location and give us detailed directions to any other location, can take pictures, record video, and give us instant access to any recorded song, published book, or movie...as well as scores of other functions.

That's some SF shiat right there that we take for granted.  A person from the 60s would be astounded.


Hell, a person from the mid-90s would be astounded. Especially in terms of storage capacity. My desktop computer at the time had about a dozen .MOD music files. I used to daydream about devices around the size of a TNG PADD that would take checker-size cartridges/discs, each holding a single movie. Even that seemed really futuristic and out-of-reach.

If I could send 14-year-old-me my current cell phone with just its 64gb worth of music, and show me that it has access to Netflix and a dozen other video streaming sites that have better quality than even Laserdisc at the time, 14-year-old-me's head would explode.
 
2014-06-04 08:00:04 AM  

Norwegian Squirrel: I suspect this whole "article" was just an excuse to show off hot alien women from old tv-shows

/ NTTIAWWT



They are hot, too.  The 50s/60s buxom look is the best look on women.
Speaking of hot alien women, I posted these pics awhile back in another thread, but they bear re-posting:

img2.wikia.nocookie.net

ilarge.listal.com
 
2014-06-04 08:02:27 AM  
We don't want flying cars. Most jerk-offs can't stay in the right lane but to pass. Why the hell would we want them airborne?
 
2014-06-04 08:10:40 AM  

farkeruk: in the early 80s, the only people with a phone were millionaires who had them in their cars.


I dated one of those.
She was an art nut. Entire house was paintings hung everywhere.
My ex gf had hooked me up with her.
I wasn't impressed.

I found it annoying then that she would make a call when we were on a date.
Also, she would call from my driveway and tell me to come out.
 
kab
2014-06-04 08:32:50 AM  
Wow.... this thread went emo right out of the gate.

Copperbelly watersnake: My grandmother rode a horse to her first job. I can today access the entire Internet on my phone even when the power is out.


Good luck riding your phone to work.

Most sci-fi is pretty awful (or incredibly optimistic) at guessing where society will be in a given year.   You can be sure that Terminator and the Matrix can be safely added to this list ahead of time.
 
2014-06-04 08:47:55 AM  

vudukungfu: farkeruk: in the early 80s, the only people with a phone were millionaires who had them in their cars.

I dated one of those.
She was an art nut. Entire house was paintings hung everywhere.
My ex gf had hooked me up with her.
I wasn't impressed.

I found it annoying then that she would make a call when we were on a date.
Also, she would call from my driveway and tell me to come out.


1.  Why would your ex gf hook you up with someone else?
2.  Why would you date somebody your ex gf hooked you up with?

I want teleportation, and yes, I know it looks like we can't have it the way a lot of sci-fi shows it, but I still wish it were possible.
 
2014-06-04 08:50:08 AM  
Overall, I'm fairly impressed with the rate of technological and medical advancement I have witnessed in my 45 years of life.  When I was younger, I always felt my father (born in 1923) had witnessed far greater advances; however, I believe the ones in my lifetime are equal, and in the next 45 years what I will witness will surpass anything either of us could have imagined.

I am looking forward to the journey.
 
2014-06-04 08:56:50 AM  

Doc Daneeka: Whine whine whine.

Automatic doors are common at pretty much every store. And I have a robot that cleans my home - it's called Roomba.

And think about all the stuff that SF didn't even dream of.  The internet. The smartphone.

When you think that each of us carries around a device in our pockets that can instantly put us in communication with anyone on the globe, can tell us any piece of information we want to know in instants, can pinpoint our exact location and give us detailed directions to any other location, can take pictures, record video, and give us instant access to any recorded song, published book, or movie...as well as scores of other functions.

That's some SF shiat right there that we take for granted.  A person from the 60s would be astounded.


Porn at your fingertips.

how ever, once we develop realistic 3D holographic, tactile porn society will crash and burn.
 
2014-06-04 08:58:06 AM  

whidbey: Why should I lament some short-sighted Baby Boomer's vision of what the future was supposed to look like?



ww2.hdnux.com
 
2014-06-04 09:00:11 AM  
The reason is because most of the technological development (including space travel) over the last 40 years has revolved around health and energy.  Those are the two most limiting factors in what is keeping us from a SF lifestyle.  A cpl examples:

1) Humans can only last so long in space before our bones deteriorate.  There are also mental health issues that have to be addressed
2) A flying cars biggest hurdle is that it would consume MASSIVE amounts of energy.  We need a cheaper energy source before it becomes feasable
 
2014-06-04 09:02:44 AM  

farkeruk: 1970 - we'd been 300,000 miles from earth.



No one has been 300,000 from Earth.
The farthest humans have gone is about half that.
 
2014-06-04 09:03:59 AM  
i1151.photobucket.com
♫ ♫ ♫ ♫ ♫ ♫
A just machine to make big decisions
Programmed by fellows with compassion and vision
We'll be clean when their work is done
We'll be eternally free yes and eternally young

What a beautiful world this will be
What a glorious time to be free
♫ ♫ ♫ ♫ ♫ ♫
 
2014-06-04 09:04:34 AM  

Doc Daneeka: Whine whine whine.

Automatic doors are common at pretty much every store. And I have a robot that cleans my home - it's called Roomba.

And think about all the stuff that SF didn't even dream of.  The internet. The smartphone.

When you think that each of us carries around a device in our pockets that can instantly put us in communication with anyone on the globe, can tell us any piece of information we want to know in instants, can pinpoint our exact location and give us detailed directions to any other location, can take pictures, record video, and give us instant access to any recorded song, published book, or movie...as well as scores of other functions.

That's some SF shiat right there that we take for granted.  A person from the 60s would be astounded.


What you say about classic SF missing the internet and personal communication revolutions is true,
but even back in the 1940s there were a couple of predictions that were pretty eerie:

In the story A LOGIC NAMED JOE, Murray Leinster correctly predicted that given a globally searchable
database a lot of people would use it for unsavory purposes.

And THE HUDDLING PLACE (by Clifford D, Simak) predicted virtual reality (well, its more like
telepresence and video conferencing) as well as the potential that such technologies have to reinforce,
not reduce, isolation between people.
 
2014-06-04 09:09:04 AM  

Copperbelly watersnake: My grandmother rode a horse to her first job. I can today access the entire Internet on my phone even when the power is out. I don't think we have any real room to complain.

I just hope I live long enough to see them look for life on Europa.


It would just be nice if transportation technology had progressed nearly as fast as communications tech.
While someone from the 1940s would be baffled by a modern telephone, they would not be by our cars or motorcycles.

And our construction methods for houses have hardly changed at all in the past century.
 
2014-06-04 09:12:43 AM  

Doc Daneeka: Whine whine whine.

Automatic doors are common at pretty much every store. And I have a robot that cleans my home - it's called Roomba.

And think about all the stuff that SF didn't even dream of.  The internet. The smartphone.

When you think that each of us carries around a device in our pockets that can instantly put us in communication with anyone on the globe, can tell us any piece of information we want to know in instants, can pinpoint our exact location and give us detailed directions to any other location, can take pictures, record video, and give us instant access to any recorded song, published book, or movie...as well as scores of other functions.

That's some SF shiat right there that we take for granted.  A person from the 60s would be astounded.


Well said. Author is being a whiny little biatch.

That said the biggest lie of the Jetsons was not the technology, but the idea that we'd all have a 8 hour workweek because we'd all be so productive, and we could spend the rest of our time screwing around... turns out that's not how things work in the real world.
 
2014-06-04 09:13:15 AM  

Gunboat: Norwegian Squirrel: I suspect this whole "article" was just an excuse to show off hot alien women from old tv-shows

/ NTTIAWWT


They are hot, too.  The 50s/60s buxom look is the best look on women.
Speaking of hot alien women, I posted these pics awhile back in another thread, but they bear re-posting:

[img2.wikia.nocookie.net image 325x433]

[ilarge.listal.com image 768x573]


Here's one of the hottest of the Star Trek TOS babes:
pics.wikifeet.com
Leslie Parrish
 
2014-06-04 09:17:14 AM  

give me doughnuts: Copperbelly watersnake: My grandmother rode a horse to her first job. I can today access the entire Internet on my phone even when the power is out. I don't think we have any real room to complain.

I just hope I live long enough to see them look for life on Europa.

It would just be nice if transportation technology had progressed nearly as fast as communications tech.
While someone from the 1940s would be baffled by a modern telephone, they would not be by our cars or motorcycles.

And our construction methods for houses have hardly changed at all in the past century.


Self-driving cars will change the world of transportation and will probably be the biggest leap in transportation since cars went mainstream.
 
2014-06-04 09:17:51 AM  

Arkanaut: That said the biggest lie of the Jetsons was not the technology, but the idea that we'd all have a 8 hour workweek because we'd all be so productive, and we could spend the rest of our time screwing around... turns out that's not how things work in the real world.



What Buckminster Fuller (1895-1983) said about "earning a living":

"We should do away with the absolutely specious notion that everybody has to earn a living. It is a fact today that one in ten thousand of us can make a technological breakthrough capable of supporting all the rest. The youth of today are absolutely right in recognizing this nonsense of earning a living. We keep inventing jobs because of this false idea that everybody has to be employed at some kind of drudgery because, according to Malthusian Darwinian theory he must justify his right to exist. So we have inspectors of inspectors and people making instruments for inspectors to inspect inspectors. The true business of people should be to go back to school and think about whatever it was they were thinking about before somebody came along and told them they had to earn a living."
 
2014-06-04 09:23:31 AM  
give me doughnuts:

Here's one of the hottest of the Star Trek TOS babes:
[pics.wikifeet.com image 200x430]
Leslie Parrish


Oh my!!
(going to do further research on imdb....)
 
2014-06-04 09:24:16 AM  

plcow: Self-driving cars will change the world of transportation and will probably be the biggest leap in transportation since cars went mainstream.


This.  I cannot wait for robot cars.   They'll be awesome.
 
2014-06-04 09:30:18 AM  

give me doughnuts: Arkanaut: That said the biggest lie of the Jetsons was not the technology, but the idea that we'd all have a 8 hour workweek because we'd all be so productive, and we could spend the rest of our time screwing around... turns out that's not how things work in the real world.


What Buckminster Fuller (1895-1983) said about "earning a living":

"We should do away with the absolutely specious notion that everybody has to earn a living. It is a fact today that one in ten thousand of us can make a technological breakthrough capable of supporting all the rest. The youth of today are absolutely right in recognizing this nonsense of earning a living. We keep inventing jobs because of this false idea that everybody has to be employed at some kind of drudgery because, according to Malthusian Darwinian theory he must justify his right to exist. So we have inspectors of inspectors and people making instruments for inspectors to inspect inspectors. The true business of people should be to go back to school and think about whatever it was they were thinking about before somebody came along and told them they had to earn a living."


That fails on so many levels.  I don't even... nevermind.

Just don't complain when that "one in ten thousand" person controls the other 9,999's lives, has a bigger house, a better car, a jet, a bigger say in the government, a bigger say in what you eat, etc. etc. etc.
 
2014-06-04 09:33:15 AM  

verbaltoxin: We don't want flying cars. Most jerk-offs can't stay in the right lane but to pass. Why the hell would we want them airborne?


Oh, man. You gave me a more horrid though: Airborne rubberneckers. At that point they would probably be a threat to national security and would require being shot down.
 
2014-06-04 09:35:37 AM  

whidbey: Why should I lament some short-sighted Baby Boomer's vision of what the future was supposed to look like? They didn't try to make that world, they doubled down on the existing one

I think you got the Boomers right and the Jetsons wrong.  The Jetsons are a sitcom of then-present life; from what I've seen the future was merely used as a device for humor.  There's no vision here, not that there needs to be, as that wasn't the point.  It's a portrayal of the future as much as the Flintstones were a portrayal of the past.  It might've shaped its viewers' perception of the future but I doubt that was the goal.
 
2014-06-04 09:55:34 AM  

Hawnkee: verbaltoxin: We don't want flying cars. Most jerk-offs can't stay in the right lane but to pass. Why the hell would we want them airborne?

Oh, man. You gave me a more horrid though: Airborne rubberneckers. At that point they would probably be a threat to national security and would require being shot down.


Or here's one for you... idiots who will drink and drive in three dimensions instead of two.
 
2014-06-04 09:55:54 AM  
"16 Tragic Scifi Calendar Miscalculations"

Wait, I meant "5 Tragic Scifi Calendar Miscalculations and 11 Other Scifi Shows and Movies Set in a Year That Still Hasn't Arrived Yet (But Admittedly Aren't Likely to be Accurate Even Then)"
 
2014-06-04 10:04:02 AM  

give me doughnuts: farkeruk: 1970 - we'd been 300,000 miles from earth.


No one has been 300,000 from Earth.
The farthest humans have gone is about half that.


The distance from the Earth to the moon is 238,900 miles.  Considering that people have orbited around the moon, when they were on the far side of it, 300,000 miles away from Earth is a good estimate.
 
2014-06-04 10:09:25 AM  

starsrift: farkeruk: I tell you what's really jarring in sci-fi movies, though - communication technology.

How so? I mean, the highest bandwidth human communication is voice. So even if you go anime style of wrist-mounted holographic displays or the any-distance 'communicators' of next gen Trek, it's just a damn phone. Sure, telepathy could be a step further, but that's not something that's interesting to portray on the screen.


The point isn't that scifi communication technology doesn't blow past current technology, it's that any communication tech in a scifi setting made before 2000 looks like something you'd currently find a better-working version of in a Happy Meal despite the fact that they have robots walking around that are indistinguishable from humans and get around using teleporters.

The other bit of jarring anachronism is computer technology, like when see an FTL starship being run by a computer that uses spools of magnetic tape.

Robotics, AI and transportation (including space flight) technology has lagged behind some overly optimistic expectations from the 20th century, but computer and communications technology has blown past even some of the more out there projections of most scifi writers from the same time.
 
2014-06-04 10:11:08 AM  
Because you can't abuse a sentient robot like a female slave when you have a bad day at work mindlessly poking the one button. You know, such was the life of Rosie.

The future will look a lot like today minus annoyances.
 
2014-06-04 10:13:51 AM  

plcow: Just don't complain when that "one in ten thousand" person controls the other 9,999's lives, has a bigger house, a better car, a jet, a bigger say in the government, a bigger say in what you eat, etc. etc. etc.


That already happens and we still have to work pointless jobs to keep the bills paid.
 
2014-06-04 10:14:58 AM  

plcow: give me doughnuts: Arkanaut: That said the biggest lie of the Jetsons was not the technology, but the idea that we'd all have a 8 hour workweek because we'd all be so productive, and we could spend the rest of our time screwing around... turns out that's not how things work in the real world.


What Buckminster Fuller (1895-1983) said about "earning a living":

"We should do away with the absolutely specious notion that everybody has to earn a living. It is a fact today that one in ten thousand of us can make a technological breakthrough capable of supporting all the rest. The youth of today are absolutely right in recognizing this nonsense of earning a living. We keep inventing jobs because of this false idea that everybody has to be employed at some kind of drudgery because, according to Malthusian Darwinian theory he must justify his right to exist. So we have inspectors of inspectors and people making instruments for inspectors to inspect inspectors. The true business of people should be to go back to school and think about whatever it was they were thinking about before somebody came along and told them they had to earn a living."

That fails on so many levels.  I don't even... nevermind.

Just don't complain when that "one in ten thousand" person controls the other 9,999's lives, has a bigger house, a better car, a jet, a bigger say in the government, a bigger say in what you eat, etc. etc. etc.


At the same time, we're currently seeing the breakdown of the old system he was criticizing. There aren't enough jobs for new graduates, and rises in productivity haven't made the poor and middle class any richer. At some point, people are going to push back against being worked to the bone for a pittance. Something has to give soon.
 
2014-06-04 10:17:45 AM  

Mad_Radhu: At the same time, we're currently seeing the breakdown of the old system he was criticizing. There aren't enough jobs for new graduates, and rises in productivity haven't made the poor and middle class any richer. At some point, people are going to push back against being worked to the bone for a pittance. Something has to give soon.


It will give. Humankind has always had three fail-safes to keep it from wrecking the planet: wars, plagues, and natural disasters.

Eventually there will be a great war, a nasty plague, and several, awful natural disasters. It sounds bleak but our history is littered with them. They all wrought huge societal changes in their wakes too.
 
2014-06-04 10:20:26 AM  

plcow: That fails on so many levels. I don't even... nevermind.


star trek, man.  the society to strive for.
 
2014-06-04 10:23:39 AM  

clkeagle: Hawnkee: verbaltoxin: We don't want flying cars. Most jerk-offs can't stay in the right lane but to pass. Why the hell would we want them airborne?

Oh, man. You gave me a more horrid though: Airborne rubberneckers. At that point they would probably be a threat to national security and would require being shot down.

Or here's one for you... idiots who will drink and drive in three dimensions instead of two.


We have those today.  They're called Airline pilots.
 
2014-06-04 10:42:52 AM  

verbaltoxin: It will give. Humankind has always had three fail-safes to keep it from wrecking the planet: wars, plagues, and natural disasters.


problem with wars:  there will likely never be another "great war" the likes of WW2 that kills millions, unless it is nuclear in nature, and the chances of THAT are infinitesimal.

problem with plagues - Healthcare has gotten too civilized in many areas for a plague to make much headway, unless something new like the walking dead that just infects everyone comes along, and that is science fiction.

the REAL lookout is a natural disaster - but even those happen regularly, and humanity bounces back incredibly quickly.  See - Katrina, Japan's recent horrors, ect.

those three fail safes are almost useless these days.  Barring the asteroid from Armageddon hitting us...  life is going to basically continue on much like it is now, with slight advances here and there, and the best advances kept from the public because there is no farking money in it.

Or do you really think that someone somewhere hasn't already figured out a car that gets over 100 miles to a gallon of gas?
 
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