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(UPI)   Scientists develop thermometer so precise it can pinpoint room temperatures to 30 billionths of a degree, but the women in the room are still cold   (upi.com) divider line 26
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527 clicks; posted to Geek » on 04 Jun 2014 at 12:15 AM (15 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



26 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-06-03 11:26:01 PM
Still cold? I wasn't aware thermometers were supposed to change the temperature.
 
2014-06-04 12:20:32 AM
As long as it can tell me if my beer is cold or super cold.
 
2014-06-04 12:21:58 AM
She's as cold as ice,
Willing to sacrifice our love.....
 
2014-06-04 12:24:50 AM
s18.postimg.org
 
2014-06-04 12:39:20 AM
Don't worry, I'll just warm my feet against the back of their legs while they try to sleep.  It'll all even out.
 
2014-06-04 12:40:19 AM
Why?

Science!
 
2014-06-04 01:21:00 AM
The best way to save energy is to convert to an extremely conservative form of Islam and make her cover as much of her body as possible at all times. You'll save as much on energy as you do on bacon.
 
2014-06-04 01:47:28 AM
This is like Daylight Saving time helping save daylight ;)
 
2014-06-04 02:17:26 AM
At that point, isn't that going to vary widely throughout the room past the first couple of decimal points?
 
2014-06-04 02:26:05 AM
Just out of curiosity, how could scientists be sure it even worked without developing a second thermometer using different technology to check the accuracy of the first?
 
2014-06-04 02:51:11 AM

Emposter: Just out of curiosity, how could scientists be sure it even worked without developing a second thermometer using different technology to check the accuracy of the first?


Because they can actually work out with math how the two beams of light will be effected by the disk at different temperatures. The issue would be if the observations don't jive with the calculations. But as they're publishing it, it would appear the observations match what they should be.
 
2014-06-04 02:55:08 AM
My wife just woke up because I set the thermostat to 74 three hours ago. 
I was actually cold for once.
 
2014-06-04 03:05:49 AM

WhyteRaven74: Emposter: Just out of curiosity, how could scientists be sure it even worked without developing a second thermometer using different technology to check the accuracy of the first?

Because they can actually work out with math how the two beams of light will be effected by the disk at different temperatures. The issue would be if the observations don't jive with the calculations. But as they're publishing it, it would appear the observations match what they should be.


No, I get that.  What I don't get is how they're able to do the calculations to check the discs effect on the light without ALREADY knowing the temperature of the disc to the same degree of accuracy as a factor in those same calculations.
 
2014-06-04 03:12:19 AM

Emposter: What I don't get is how they're able to do the calculations to check the discs effect on the light without ALREADY knowing the temperature of the disc to the same degree of accuracy as a factor in those same calculations.


You can calculate what the disk will due to the light at any given temperature by working from the properties of the disk and inputting a temperature into the calculation as a variable. It's a matter of knowing the properties of the disk on a very small scale and how it interplay with light, from there you can work out what it'll do to light at any particular temperature.
 
2014-06-04 03:20:30 AM

WhyteRaven74: Emposter: What I don't get is how they're able to do the calculations to check the discs effect on the light without ALREADY knowing the temperature of the disc to the same degree of accuracy as a factor in those same calculations.

You can calculate what the disk will due to the light at any given temperature by working from the properties of the disk and inputting a temperature into the calculation as a variable. It's a matter of knowing the properties of the disk on a very small scale and how it interplay with light, from there you can work out what it'll do to light at any particular temperature.


You're just repeating what I already said I know, without answering the question.  How do you work out what the disc will do to light at a given temperature if you don't know what temperature the disc is?  You'd need some way to determine the temperature so that you could run the calculations in the first place, which would require either A) a second method of measuring temperature to a 30 billionth of a degree, or B) a method of controlling the temperature to a 30 billionth of a degree.

Otherwise you're just calculating in circles.
 
2014-06-04 03:21:50 AM
Less is more.
 
2014-06-04 03:38:22 AM

Emposter: which would require either A) a second method of measuring temperature to a 30 billionth of a degree, or B) a method of controlling the temperature to a 30 billionth of a degree.


Came here to say that :)
It could be 100% accurate, but there is no way to know for sure.
It could even be used as a new reference, but that would take acceptance.
/drtfa
 
2014-06-04 07:34:53 AM
Temperature is a statistical property of a gaussian distribution of a large number of particles.  They may be able to measure the energy in a tiny area very precisely, but that's not 'temperature'.
 
2014-06-04 08:51:47 AM
Awesome...the global climate change graphs are going to be even more misleading.
 
2014-06-04 09:34:26 AM
At what range or precission?  Generally with greater accuracy most measuring devices have to give up on range and/or precission.
 
2014-06-04 09:34:56 AM

Emposter: Otherwise you're just calculating in circles.


www.paulburgess.org


There's nothing wrong with calculating in circles.
 
2014-06-04 09:43:05 AM

dittybopper: Emposter: Otherwise you're just calculating in circles.

[www.paulburgess.org image 400x389]


There's nothing wrong with calculating in circles.


Well, except that my toy of a phone can do the same job, more precisely and faster.
 
2014-06-04 09:52:28 AM

ikanreed: dittybopper: Emposter: Otherwise you're just calculating in circles.

[www.paulburgess.org image 400x389]


There's nothing wrong with calculating in circles.

Well, except that my toy of a phone can do the same job, more precisely and faster.


Not faster, because the limitation is in your ability to enter the data, not calculating speed, and you've never heard of "false precision"?

Also, something like that works without batteries.  Always.

I carry a Pickett N-200T Pocket Trig most of the time.  Looks like this:

sliderulemuseum.com

Except mine is imprinted with


AMERICAN-STANDARD

INDUSTRIAL DIVISION * DETROIT, MICHIGAN 48232


on the trig side.
 
2014-06-04 10:16:42 AM

dittybopper: Not faster, because the limitation is in your ability to enter the data, not calculating speed, and you've never heard of "false precision"?


Yeah, because slide rules totally store and communicate all those sig-figs.  You do have to understand the math you're doing at some level to use a calculator, but seriously?  You're arguing that slide rules do that better?
 
2014-06-04 11:54:55 AM

ikanreed: dittybopper: Not faster, because the limitation is in your ability to enter the data, not calculating speed, and you've never heard of "false precision"?

Yeah, because slide rules totally store and communicate all those sig-figs.  You do have to understand the math you're doing at some level to use a calculator, but seriously?  You're arguing that slide rules do that better?


No, I'm arguing that they aren't necessarily as obsolete as you might think.   I'm arguing that using an electronic method to calculate isn't so much better that there isn't a place for them.  Pilots often still use E6B's, or at least carry them as a back-up, because there are no batteries to run down or electronics to fail.  It's two circular pieces (generally either metal or cardboard) with the appropriate markings on them.

I don't have to worry if I drop my Pickett in a puddle.  It'll still work.

Above all, though, I think they should be used for primary math instruction because it's a very visually intuitive way to show how basics like multiplication, division, exponents, and trigonometry work.

My Pickett is, at a bare minimum, 48 years old, and still works as good as the day it was made.  In fact, it's older than I am.

Will your phone still work in 2062?
 
2014-06-04 01:06:12 PM

Emposter: WhyteRaven74: Emposter: What I don't get is how they're able to do the calculations to check the discs effect on the light without ALREADY knowing the temperature of the disc to the same degree of accuracy as a factor in those same calculations.

You can calculate what the disk will due to the light at any given temperature by working from the properties of the disk and inputting a temperature into the calculation as a variable. It's a matter of knowing the properties of the disk on a very small scale and how it interplay with light, from there you can work out what it'll do to light at any particular temperature.

You're just repeating what I already said I know, without answering the question.  How do you work out what the disc will do to light at a given temperature if you don't know what temperature the disc is?  You'd need some way to determine the temperature so that you could run the calculations in the first place, which would require either A) a second method of measuring temperature to a 30 billionth of a degree, or B) a method of controlling the temperature to a 30 billionth of a degree.

Otherwise you're just calculating in circles.


You determine the dielectric function of the material, using multi spectral ellipsometry. The rest is just math.
 
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