Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Slate)   Hubble peers into a cosmic jelly bean bag   (slate.com ) divider line
    More: Cool, Hubble Space Telescope, universe, Philip C. Plait, active galaxies, diffraction, light-years away, Death from the Skies, Bad Astronomy  
•       •       •

2198 clicks; posted to Geek » on 03 Jun 2014 at 11:27 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



26 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-06-03 08:51:24 PM  
Where have I seen that before?.. Oh yeah

sirian.warpcore.org
 
2014-06-03 08:51:55 PM  
This just amazes me.

We can make a rough guess as to the number of stars in our galaxy. How many are like our Sun just in our galaxy? Not a clue. Our sun isn't very big or bright and with dust and brighter objects it means their might be many more than we think there are.. just in our galaxy..... I see maybe 6-10 local stars in that picture and all the rest are other freakin galaxies

I want to go there...
 
2014-06-03 08:54:38 PM  
My god, it's full of stars
 
2014-06-03 09:09:42 PM  

texdent: My god, it's full of stars galaxies


FTFY
 
2014-06-03 09:18:18 PM  
A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away...
 
2014-06-03 09:25:28 PM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away...


Phil Plait ruined my childhood!

j/k, Phil. You know we love you.
 
2014-06-03 09:30:33 PM  

AverageAmericanGuy: Phil Plait ruined my childhood!

j/k, Phil. You know we love you.


Seriously

/props to Phil
//I always enjoy your articles, Sir
 
2014-06-03 09:37:26 PM  
The really amazing thing is that God created all of that just to create a tribe of Neolithic herders in the middle east on Earth.
 
2014-06-03 09:57:18 PM  

revrendjim: The really amazing thing is that God created all of that just to create a tribe of Neolithic herders in the middle east on Earth.


So he wasn't busy that day?
 
2014-06-03 10:46:25 PM  
I've seen better
 
2014-06-03 11:48:13 PM  
....and nothing I, or anyone else on this planet, have done or ever will do, matters.

Except for the guy that eventually figures out FTL/interstellar travel for humanity.
 
2014-06-03 11:54:02 PM  
Astronomer must be on a diet, thinking of candy like that.
 
2014-06-04 12:12:29 AM  
Come on NASA, upgrade your software to Kit Kat!
 
2014-06-04 01:58:50 AM  
deeper & deeper

farther & farther


like Alice's walk through Wonderland...
 
2014-06-04 02:15:15 AM  
Was out observing galaxies (and globular clusters) this evening.  Ninety minutes brought NGC 4631, 4627, and 4656/7 ("The Whale and Pup" and "The Hockey Stick"), NGC 4565, NGC 4015, several other galaxies I need to check against charts, and M53, NGC 5466, NGC 5053, and NGC 5897 (all globular clusters).  And that was with a six-day-old Moon next door in Leo, a sky that quickly deteriorated into pea soup, and a number of active skunks somewhere nearby.

Love articles like TFA.  An excellent dose of humility and perspective.
 
2014-06-04 03:39:18 AM  
Whoops--make that NGC 4150, not 4015.
 
2014-06-04 06:02:03 AM  
It'll have to go.
 
2014-06-04 08:30:17 AM  

grinding_journalist: ....and nothing I, or anyone else on this planet, have done or ever will do, matters.

Except for the guy that eventually figures out FTL/interstellar travel for humanity.


Easy. Just inform the japanese that we've discovered a planet with intelligent life like our pwn where the apex species is reprisented by giant tentacle monsters as males and, inexplicably, what looks like schoolgirlsnas females.

We'll be travelling at warp speeds within a month.
 
2014-06-04 08:39:50 AM  

GypsyJoker: Was out observing galaxies (and globular clusters) this evening.  Ninety minutes brought NGC 4631, 4627, and 4656/7 ("The Whale and Pup" and "The Hockey Stick"), NGC 4565, NGC 4015, several other galaxies I need to check against charts, and M53, NGC 5466, NGC 5053, and NGC 5897 (all globular clusters).  And that was with a six-day-old Moon next door in Leo, a sky that quickly deteriorated into pea soup, and a number of active skunks somewhere nearby.

Love articles like TFA.  An excellent dose of humility and perspective.


Later this summer, I'll get an opportunity to really put Deep Sky Stacker and my new telescope with DSLR adapter to good use. It's painful to live in a city, with sky views so poor that even Jupiter looks like a lump, and have all this hardware and software just... sitting. Can't even see Alcor on the clearest nights.
 
2014-06-04 09:25:31 AM  

unchellmatt: GypsyJoker: Was out observing galaxies (and globular clusters) this evening.  Ninety minutes brought NGC 4631, 4627, and 4656/7 ("The Whale and Pup" and "The Hockey Stick"), NGC 4565, NGC 4015, several other galaxies I need to check against charts, and M53, NGC 5466, NGC 5053, and NGC 5897 (all globular clusters).  And that was with a six-day-old Moon next door in Leo, a sky that quickly deteriorated into pea soup, and a number of active skunks somewhere nearby.

Love articles like TFA.  An excellent dose of humility and perspective.

Later this summer, I'll get an opportunity to really put Deep Sky Stacker and my new telescope with DSLR adapter to good use. It's painful to live in a city, with sky views so poor that even Jupiter looks like a lump, and have all this hardware and software just... sitting. Can't even see Alcor on the clearest nights.


Ugh.

I've been there--I grew up in the suburbs of Cincinnati (limiting magnitude about 4.5, and choking humidity that turned the city skyglow into a constant fog of grey sky-light).  It actually made me a better observer, though, because I really had to struggle to see anything more than a few vaporous blobs in the scope.  I got the entire Messier catalogue there somehow.

There's a guy on the CloudyNights forums who does imaging from central London--nothing fancy, but he gets 18th-magnitude (!) galaxies in his images on decent nights (his user name is nytecam, if you feel like looking him up; his pictures can be found here).  A guy in my club here imaged the Coma Galaxy Cluster in our crappy, humid, light-polluted conditions with the 1st-Quarter Moon nearby and got more than a hundred galaxies in the frame.

I guess what I'm saying is to stay with it. It can be really discouraging to live somewhere where the conditions for astronomy suck, but if you really push yourself and your gear, you might be amazed at what you can do.
 
2014-06-04 09:46:12 AM  

GypsyJoker: There's a guy on the CloudyNights forums who does imaging from central London--nothing fancy, but he gets 18th-magnitude (!) galaxies in his images on decent nights (his user name is nytecam, if you feel like looking him up; his pictures can be found here). A guy in my club here imaged the Coma Galaxy Cluster in our crappy, humid, light-polluted conditions with the 1st-Quarter Moon nearby and got more than a hundred galaxies in the frame.


Thanks for the tip! I hadn't seen his posts, now I'm going to be horribly unproductive at work today :)
 
2014-06-04 09:51:38 AM  

revrendjim: The really amazing thing is that God created all of that just to create a tribe of Neolithic herders in the middle east on Earth.


*tips fedora*
 
2014-06-04 09:52:13 AM  
static4.quoteswave.com
 
2014-06-04 10:13:59 AM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away...


nevernotanerd.com
 
2014-06-04 10:15:27 AM  

unchellmatt: GypsyJoker: There's a guy on the CloudyNights forums who does imaging from central London--nothing fancy, but he gets 18th-magnitude (!) galaxies in his images on decent nights (his user name is nytecam, if you feel like looking him up; his pictures can be found here). A guy in my club here imaged the Coma Galaxy Cluster in our crappy, humid, light-polluted conditions with the 1st-Quarter Moon nearby and got more than a hundred galaxies in the frame.

Thanks for the tip! I hadn't seen his posts, now I'm going to be horribly unproductive at work today :)


No problem.  And sorry about that!
 
2014-06-04 12:59:39 PM  
It always boggles my mind to think that the light from some of those galaxies originated as many as 5,000 years ago.
 
Displayed 26 of 26 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter








In Other Media
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report