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(Dallas News)   Ever wonder how much your likeness is worth if used in a wildly popular and profitable sports video game? Let's check with Electronic Arts   (dallasnews.com) divider line 9
    More: Followup, Electronic Arts, settlements, Ed O'Bannon, named plaintiff, video games  
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1437 clicks; posted to Business » on 03 Jun 2014 at 10:03 AM (15 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



9 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-06-03 08:26:48 AM
$48.

But that's per year, so everything's alright, right?
 
2014-06-03 10:08:13 AM

SphericalTime: $48.

But that's per year, so everything's alright, right?


I'm not sure my likeness is worth $48 (Which is true of about all but 300 NCAA Football players in any given season), but I suspect that Marcus Mariota's and Jameis WInston's likenesses are worth a whole lot more than $48.
 
2014-06-03 10:59:32 AM
That's me...Bald guy in the stands holding a sign.
 
2014-06-03 11:18:33 AM
Thus begins the slippery slope of college players getting paid (out-right) for playing sports.
 
2014-06-03 11:54:56 AM

Gnaglor: Thus begins the slippery slope of college players getting paid (out-right) for playing sports.


Yeah, there's a bigger discussion here about that.  Considering the size and profitability of the college football and basketball industry, calling them "non-profit" or "amateur" at this point is somewhat laughable-everybody involved gets paid mega-bucks other than the actual players.

d.fastcompany.net
 
2014-06-03 12:13:17 PM
Just watched "Schooled" on netflix....pretty good documentary and raised some interesting points.

A kid on a full-scholarship who was elected as student body president was able to receive a stipend of $5,000.   I knew other students who had scholarships that were allowed to work part-time jobs.  So there is a precedent for having a scholarship and receiving extra money.

If we cared so much about "student" athletes, then why are the games for the final four held during the week instead of the weekend, so students don't miss so much class.  Some colleges have attendance policies where if a student misses X number of classes, they are automatically withdrawn, how do student athletes get around those policies?

Shouldn't amateur sports also have amateur coaches?

it also mentioned that in 2006, the NBA can no longer draft high school players, I don't remember this rule change and can't seem to find a citation for it
 
2014-06-03 12:30:40 PM

Hyjamon: Just watched "Schooled" on netflix....pretty good documentary and raised some interesting points.

A kid on a full-scholarship who was elected as student body president was able to receive a stipend of $5,000.   I knew other students who had scholarships that were allowed to work part-time jobs.  So there is a precedent for having a scholarship and receiving extra money.

If we cared so much about "student" athletes, then why are the games for the final four held during the week instead of the weekend, so students don't miss so much class.  Some colleges have attendance policies where if a student misses X number of classes, they are automatically withdrawn, how do student athletes get around those policies?

Shouldn't amateur sports also have amateur coaches?

it also mentioned that in 2006, the NBA can no longer draft high school players, I don't remember this rule change and can't seem to find a citation for it


It's an NBA rule usually called the "One and Done" rule, it was negotiated with the players union as a part of the 2005 collective bargaining agreement. Link
 
2014-06-03 01:10:57 PM
I think that we should have a program where we have amateur and professional college athletes

1  Amateur - current situation, get your scholarship, get your degree, don't get any money

2.  Professional - have an agent, make appearance money, do advertising, but you pay for school out of your pocket.  You can make money on the side, but you have to meet the same academic standards of the amateur athlete.   If you put in for the NFL draft and don't get drafted, you can return to college ball as a professional.   Same number of years of eligibility as an amateur athlete

An Amateur College Player can declare professional, any time they want, but a Professional can't become an amateur again.

With how expensive school is, I expect that we will see a lot less professionals than we think there will be now.   Other players watch their teammates declare professional and have to drop out of school a year later because they can't afford it anymore, will help them realize the true value of their scholarship.
 
2014-06-03 03:19:38 PM

weiserfireman: I think that we should have a program where we have amateur and professional college athletes

1  Amateur - current situation, get your scholarship, get your degree, don't get any money

2.  Professional - have an agent, make appearance money, do advertising, but you pay for school out of your pocket.  You can make money on the side, but you have to meet the same academic standards of the amateur athlete.   If you put in for the NFL draft and don't get drafted, you can return to college ball as a professional.   Same number of years of eligibility as an amateur athlete

An Amateur College Player can declare professional, any time they want, but a Professional can't become an amateur again.

With how expensive school is, I expect that we will see a lot less professionals than we think there will be now.   Other players watch their teammates declare professional and have to drop out of school a year later because they can't afford it anymore, will help them realize the true value of their scholarship.


nice idea, but the amateurs still need something.  Now, I never played Div I football but I do remember being a college student.  Now this varies from school to school, but if you had a meal plan it sucked because the cafeteria was only open TWICE on the weekends.  Brunch and then for dinner (4-6:30 or some early time).  Now, if you play a sport and miss dinner due to the game, travel, practice, etc.  What do you do for food?

My roomates and I would always pack a sandwich from the cafeteria and take it back to our dorm room since we wouldn't be able to eat again until 9 or 10 the next morning (unless we had money to get a pizza or something).  athletes aren't really supposed to have money, so they get cheered by thousands on saturday afternoon, then sit around hungry the rest of the day.
 
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