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(Poynter Institute)   One year ago, The Chicago Sun-Times fired 28 staff photographers and told the reporters to take pictures with their iPhones. Let's see what happened to those photographers. Next please let's compare the past year's photos with the shots taken by pros   (poynter.org ) divider line
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24508 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Jun 2014 at 5:47 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-06-01 12:59:06 AM  
Four were effectively forced into early retirement. Said 61-year-old Ernie Torres, who worked at the Sun-Times for four decades: "I've kinda hung up the camera right now." Having time off with his grandchildren has been "fantastic," but his unemployment checks have run out, so he's going to start looking for a way to supplement his wife's income.

This terrifies me.
 
2014-06-01 01:25:35 AM  
I thought one of the first rules of journalism was not to make yourself the story?

Sure I can see it being newsworthy that a newspaper fired all their photographers, but a "where are they now" story?  really?
 
2014-06-01 02:35:09 AM  

Ambivalence: Sure I can see it being newsworthy that a newspaper fired all their photographers, but a "where are they now" story? really?


It's relevant to them; The Poynter Institute is a non-profit school for journalism located in St. Petersburg, Florida. (wiki)
 
2014-06-01 05:53:23 AM  

Lsherm: Four were effectively forced into early retirement. Said 61-year-old Ernie Torres, who worked at the Sun-Times for four decades: "I've kinda hung up the camera right now." Having time off with his grandchildren has been "fantastic," but his unemployment checks have run out, so he's going to start looking for a way to supplement his wife's income.

This terrifies me.


Too many young folks today dream of the day the Boomers retire, and they get our jobs. Actually kiddies - most of those jobs are just going to vanish when we leave them - the Boss don't need them done anymore.
You'd better take a page from the Orient regarding esteem for your elders, and learn to love wiping our wrinkled bottoms - it's going to be the only job half of you can get.
 
2014-06-01 06:00:29 AM  
jso2897: Lsherm: Four were effectively forced into early retirement. Said 61-year-old Ernie Torres, who worked at the Sun-Times for four decades: "I've kinda hung up the camera right now." Having time off with his grandchildren has been "fantastic," but his unemployment checks have run out, so he's going to start looking for a way to supplement his wife's income.

This terrifies me.

Too many young folks today dream of the day the Boomers retiredie, and they get our jobs. Actually kiddies - most of those jobs are just going to vanish when we leave them - the Boss don't need them done anymore.
You'd better take a page from the Orient regarding esteem for your elders, and learn to love wiping our wrinkled bottoms - it's going to be the only job half of you can get.

If you think a younger generation will be content with cleaning your shiatty asshole then you are even more out of touch than you sound.
 
2014-06-01 06:04:30 AM  

jso2897: You'd better take a page from the Orient regarding esteem for your elders, and learn to love wiping our wrinkled bottoms - it's going to be the only job half of you can get.


Yes, and this should worry you. A lot.
 
2014-06-01 06:10:33 AM  

MooseUpNorth: jso2897: You'd better take a page from the Orient regarding esteem for your elders, and learn to love wiping our wrinkled bottoms - it's going to be the only job half of you can get.

Yes, and this should worry you. A lot.


It's basically Japan's nightmare - it's a horrible future for our society. And sadly, we are mimicking Japan's errors - allowing capital to concentrate in few hands, and getting "tough" on immigration at perhaps the worst time in our history for us to do so.
And of course, systemic unemployment is a real thing, in my belief - I don't want to start that debate here - but I don't see it going away.
 
2014-06-01 06:11:49 AM  

Wolf892: jso2897: Lsherm: Four were effectively forced into early retirement. Said 61-year-old Ernie Torres, who worked at the Sun-Times for four decades: "I've kinda hung up the camera right now." Having time off with his grandchildren has been "fantastic," but his unemployment checks have run out, so he's going to start looking for a way to supplement his wife's income.

This terrifies me.

Too many young folks today dream of the day the Boomers retire, and they get our jobs. Actually kiddies - most of those jobs are just going to vanish when we leave them - the Boss don't need them done anymore.
You'd better take a page from the Orient regarding esteem for your elders, and learn to love wiping our wrinkled bottoms - it's going to be the only job half of you can get.

I'm planning on using hemp, dipped in resin then rolled in crushed glass, the way the ancients wiped their elders ass.

Get used to a little spotting.


Dude - do you seriously think I would post that if I cared about getting trolled? Don't waste your keystrokes.
 
2014-06-01 06:16:03 AM  
I think this has nothing to do with newspapers becoming obsolete than it does economy.

Jobs change, but that doesn't mean there won't be any jobs.
 
2014-06-01 06:16:25 AM  

Lsherm: Four were effectively forced into early retirement. Said 61-year-old Ernie Torres, who worked at the Sun-Times for four decades: "I've kinda hung up the camera right now." Having time off with his grandchildren has been "fantastic," but his unemployment checks have run out, so he's going to start looking for a way to supplement his wife's income.

This terrifies me.


Did you hear about Fred, he's unemployed.
They threw him away like a useless toy.
Went down the drain after 20 long years.
No warning, no pension, nobody cares.
And I can't believe that anyone would
Want to do such a terrible thing.
But why should I care?
 
2014-06-01 06:23:37 AM  

jso2897: You'd better take a page from the Orient regarding esteem for your elders, and learn to love wiping our wrinkled bottoms - it's going to be the only job half of you can get.


content9.flixster.com
I wouldn't count on it
 
2014-06-01 06:25:13 AM  
So this means the reporters are scabs in a good Democrat union town like Chicago. How many of them got tied to engine blocks and dropped in the Chicago river or just outright beaten to death by union thugs?
lh5.googleusercontent.com
 
2014-06-01 06:25:53 AM  
On the one hand, half of them ending up basically permanently unemployed ("early retirement" isn't actually retirement without a benefits package, and "freelance" is a word that means 'not quite homeless yet, but getting there') is kind of sad.

On the other hand, half of them still being unemployed after a year kind of supports the paper's central assertion that the job itself is semi-obsolete.  I guess literally "semi" in this case.

So... yeah.  Sucks to be a professional buggy-whip manufacturer in the age of automobiles and steam engines, I guess.
 
2014-06-01 06:30:19 AM  
I must suck at math. 'Most' landed on their feet?
 
2014-06-01 06:30:30 AM  
There's always new kinds of jobs, e.g. digital art for video games. Open your mind.
 
2014-06-01 06:31:17 AM  
Hopefully they'll know to take those cellphone pictures with their camera oriented the right way.
 
2014-06-01 06:37:45 AM  
FTFA:

As a 23-year-old in 2010, Powers realized he didn't need a college degree to be a full-time staff photographer at the Aurora Beacon News, a suburban Sun-Times paper. But in 2013, after being laid off, it turned out he needed that degree after all. He missed out on a staff photographer job because he didn't finish his degree at Western Kentucky University

Can an American Farker please explain this to me? I know you guys seem to need a college degree for any role higher than janitor over there, but why would having a degree factor at all in re-hiring for existing roles? Is it just me, or wouldn't you just keep those who have displayed the best skill for the role, growth potential, and who best fits the values of your organisation?
 
2014-06-01 06:38:31 AM  

abhorrent1: jso2897: You'd better take a page from the Orient regarding esteem for your elders, and learn to love wiping our wrinkled bottoms - it's going to be the only job half of you can get.

[content9.flixster.com image 240x240]
I wouldn't count on it


Don't think that I endorse what I describe - but the sad fact is that we're worth a lot more alive to you than dead. If you look at the way most Boomers have their money invested, most of their capital is going to vanish with them when they die - either into the maw of Wall Street or the coffers of the IRS. When the Boomers kick it, America is going to look around and see how few real jobs our current sort of economy produces.
Actually, the Boomers are irrelevant in the long run - if you are willing to live in a society that is run for the benefit of a tiny handful of rich people, your lives will continue to get worse, Boomers or no Boomers.
As for myself, don't worry - I'm not counting on anything or anybody, and never have.
What we humans call "reality" is notoriously unreliable.
 
2014-06-01 06:49:23 AM  
Of course the newspaper did!
Right after firing their reporters and hiring bloggers instead!!


/why go to the news when you can just grab news off the wire, rewrite it and yer done.
 
2014-06-01 06:50:40 AM  

Monaro: FTFA:

As a 23-year-old in 2010, Powers realized he didn't need a college degree to be a full-time staff photographer at the Aurora Beacon News, a suburban Sun-Times paper. But in 2013, after being laid off, it turned out he needed that degree after all. He missed out on a staff photographer job because he didn't finish his degree at Western Kentucky University

Can an American Farker please explain this to me? I know you guys seem to need a college degree for any role higher than janitor over there, but why would having a degree factor at all in re-hiring for existing roles? Is it just me, or wouldn't you just keep those who have displayed the best skill for the role, growth potential, and who best fits the values of your organisation?


So much this!  Big Education is the only institution that benefits from employers demanding a college diploma.
 
2014-06-01 06:54:24 AM  

OscarTamerz: So this means the reporters are scabs in a good Democrat union town like Chicago. How many of them got tied to engine blocks and dropped in the Chicago river or just outright beaten to death by union thugs?

img.fark.net
Great.  A multi-decade old picture from when unions were tough and people were genuinely afraid to pay a CEO 500 to 1000x the average workers salary.  Unions are a shell of their former selves, squabbling with each other, decreased in number, and holding little if any real power.  That must mean things are better now.  Wages up.  Quality of life up.  More jobs now that we got the unions out of the way.  So, lets see some data on how great workers are doing now that the private unions are out of the way.
 
2014-06-01 06:54:37 AM  

Ambivalence: I thought one of the first rules of journalism was not to make yourself the story?

Sure I can see it being newsworthy that a newspaper fired all their photographers, but a "where are they now" story?  really?


We gave up in that a long time ago. Al sharpton is a cable news host fo Gods sake. And id rather be between a mother bear and her cub than between sharpton and a camera. And anderson cooper is a solid second on that score: a cooper story is all about cooper bringing you the story.
 
2014-06-01 06:56:16 AM  

jso2897: Lsherm: Four were effectively forced into early retirement. Said 61-year-old Ernie Torres, who worked at the Sun-Times for four decades: "I've kinda hung up the camera right now." Having time off with his grandchildren has been "fantastic," but his unemployment checks have run out, so he's going to start looking for a way to supplement his wife's income.

This terrifies me.

Too many young folks today dream of the day the Boomers retire, and they get our jobs. Actually kiddies - most of those jobs are just going to vanish when we leave them - the Boss don't need them done anymore.
You'd better take a page from the Orient regarding esteem for your elders, and learn to love wiping our wrinkled bottoms - it's going to be the only job half of you can get.


Ever see the movie "Logan's Run" gramps?
 
2014-06-01 07:02:19 AM  
If you base your way of earning a living on the graces of a bigger entity, then you need to stop whining when the bigger entity goes away, or simply decides you're not needed.

Plumber, lawyer, doctor, gardener, mechanic -- these occupations do things that will always be needed and aren't dependent on being continuously employed by a bigger entity.

Teacher, designer, planner, receptionist, librarian, fork-lift driver -- these are occupations that can't be pursued as one-man-bands. So if the 28 staff photographers are actual photographers, they may do fine. If they were doing some role that is dependent on being part of a bigger entity, then they made the wrong choice.

Of course, if the expertise of being a photographer, of understanding shutter speeds and aperture and film types, now if those bits ever get digitised so that even a moron can take a good picture from a moving car in the dark, then they're fooked regardless. Hope they didn't get a mortgage on the weight of mastering 1954 technology.
 
2014-06-01 07:09:51 AM  

Jim_Callahan: On the one hand, half of them ending up basically permanently unemployed ("early retirement" isn't actually retirement without a benefits package, and "freelance" is a word that means 'not quite homeless yet, but getting there') is kind of sad.

On the other hand, half of them still being unemployed after a year kind of supports the paper's central assertion that the job itself is semi-obsolete.  I guess literally "semi" in this case.

So... yeah.  Sucks to be a professional buggy-whip manufacturer in the age of automobiles and steam engines, I guess.


Yup. Everything is online media now. Cameras are all but dead at this point. I can't even remember the last time I went to a web page that had a picture on it. Everyone prefers to read their news right there in black and white without any of that outdated media junk cluttering it up.
 
2014-06-01 07:15:17 AM  

Monaro: FTFA:

As a 23-year-old in 2010, Powers realized he didn't need a college degree to be a full-time staff photographer at the Aurora Beacon News, a suburban Sun-Times paper. But in 2013, after being laid off, it turned out he needed that degree after all. He missed out on a staff photographer job because he didn't finish his degree at Western Kentucky University

Can an American Farker please explain this to me? I know you guys seem to need a college degree for any role higher than janitor over there, but why would having a degree factor at all in re-hiring for existing roles? Is it just me, or wouldn't you just keep those who have displayed the best skill for the role, growth potential, and who best fits the values of your organisation?


You would think but no, right now a lot of jobs here that in the past all yoou would need is some experience you now need a masters degree. Its a sellers market here for work right now, in the past some farkers have talked about jobs they applied for where they would need 5 years experience using a program that has been around for 1 year.
 
2014-06-01 07:23:58 AM  

Owangotang: jso2897: Lsherm: Four were effectively forced into early retirement. Said 61-year-old Ernie Torres, who worked at the Sun-Times for four decades: "I've kinda hung up the camera right now." Having time off with his grandchildren has been "fantastic," but his unemployment checks have run out, so he's going to start looking for a way to supplement his wife's income.

This terrifies me.

Too many young folks today dream of the day the Boomers retiredie, and they get our jobs. Actually kiddies - most of those jobs are just going to vanish when we leave them - the Boss don't need them done anymore.
You'd better take a page from the Orient regarding esteem for your elders, and learn to love wiping our wrinkled bottoms - it's going to be the only job half of you can get.

If you think a younger generation will be content with cleaning your shiatty asshole then you are even more out of touch than you sound.


Oh, we never said you'd be content...
 
2014-06-01 07:30:27 AM  

OscarTamerz: So this means the reporters are scabs in a good Democrat union town like Chicago. How many of them got tied to engine blocks and dropped in the Chicago river or just outright beaten to death by union thugs?


DA UNINZ!!!!!

Shows a lot about a person when they're willing to dig that deep to insult the working man.
 
2014-06-01 07:30:51 AM  
I didn't see any comparisons.
 
2014-06-01 07:33:58 AM  

Resident Muslim: Of course the newspaper did!
Right after firing their reporters and hiring bloggers instead!!


/why go to the news when you can just grab news off the wire, rewrite it and yer done.


Vice magazine (and its Internet and tv properties) have proved this wrong in a big way. It's not that we're not willing to pay for news, it's that the way we get our news and what we expect from the authenticity of content and presentation have changed. Newspapers haven't kept up because like everyone else they are obsessed with appearing "legitimate" to a 50-70 year old audience.
 
2014-06-01 07:37:07 AM  

letrole: even a moron can take a good picture from a moving car in the dark


What if I'm a moron AND I suck at taking pictures tho?
 
2014-06-01 07:39:58 AM  

Owangotang: If you think a younger generation will be content with cleaning your shiatty asshole then you are even more out of touch than you sound.


You'd sound tougher if so many asses weren't already being wiped. Or if the ass-wiping rate was going down even. Or even staying even.
 
2014-06-01 07:42:51 AM  

Jim_Callahan: On the one hand, half of them ending up basically permanently unemployed ("early retirement" isn't actually retirement without a benefits package, and "freelance" is a word that means 'not quite homeless yet, but getting there') is kind of sad.

On the other hand, half of them still being unemployed after a year kind of supports the paper's central assertion that the job itself is semi-obsolete.  I guess literally "semi" in this case.

So... yeah.  Sucks to be a professional buggy-whip manufacturer in the age of automobiles and steam engines, I guess.


There's very few positions for it these days. Most companies hire contractors. But not everyone wants to or is good at running a business.
 
2014-06-01 07:45:38 AM  
Yes, let's see how mulatto Jesus President Hussein has been doing for the working man or did you want to go ahead and blame everything on Bush now? After all Obama's massas bought him the presidency twice for billions of dollars so he could bring to bear his vast experience community organizing to negotiating with terrorists and getting ass farked in the process.
 
2014-06-01 07:47:39 AM  

letrole: If you base your way of earning a living on the graces of a bigger entity, then you need to stop whining when the bigger entity goes away, or simply decides you're not needed.

Plumber, lawyer, doctor, gardener, mechanic -- these occupations do things that will always be needed and aren't dependent on being continuously employed by a bigger entity.

Teacher, designer, planner, receptionist, librarian, fork-lift driver -- these are occupations that can't be pursued as one-man-bands. So if the 28 staff photographers are actual photographers, they may do fine. If they were doing some role that is dependent on being part of a bigger entity, then they made the wrong choice.

Of course, if the expertise of being a photographer, of understanding shutter speeds and aperture and film types, now if those bits ever get digitised so that even a moron can take a good picture from a moving car in the dark, then they're fooked regardless. Hope they didn't get a mortgage on the weight of mastering 1954 technology.


Most Americans need to work in organizations, and the problem usually isn't one of capital. The problem is, they need to be told what to do. Sure, wives and girlfriends pick up the slack on the off hours, but there's only so much they can do. They have lives, too.  American men need more guidance than even the naggiest nag can provide.
Land of the farking free, my ass.
 
2014-06-01 07:49:53 AM  

Monaro: FTFA:

As a 23-year-old in 2010, Powers realized he didn't need a college degree to be a full-time staff photographer at the Aurora Beacon News, a suburban Sun-Times paper. But in 2013, after being laid off, it turned out he needed that degree after all. He missed out on a staff photographer job because he didn't finish his degree at Western Kentucky University

Can an American Farker please explain this to me? I know you guys seem to need a college degree for any role higher than janitor over there, but why would having a degree factor at all in re-hiring for existing roles? Is it just me, or wouldn't you just keep those who have displayed the best skill for the role, growth potential, and who best fits the values of your organisation?


Hahahaha.  You're funny.  I worked for a major U.S. telecom for about 10 years - around year 9, they were trying to demote me (despite highest job performance rankings from the day I was hired) because I had the "wrong" undergraduate degree - a bachelor of arts (because I went to a liberal ARTS college) rather than a bachelor of science.  My college offered only bachelor of arts degrees, even in things like physics, chemistry, etc.  It was only through a LOT of push back from some VP-level folks that I was able to keep my job title + current pay grade.  Really crazy stuff, but completely standard around here, especially with big companies that want to standardize on a policy rather than having to use a little common sense.
 
2014-06-01 07:52:20 AM  

Monaro: Can an American Farker please explain this to me? I know you guys seem to need a college degree for any role higher than janitor over there, but why would having a degree factor at all in re-hiring for existing roles? Is it just me, or wouldn't you just keep those who have displayed the best skill for the role, growth potential, and who best fits the values of your organisation?


One of the biggest reasons that degrees are demanded is because of the Human Resources Department's process.  For every professional level job - such as staff photographer - requirements are established.  The person for whom the new hire works has input to that set of criteria but only input.  The HR professionals actually run the show.   All resumes and job apps are sent to HR.  HR does the initial screening process.  In many cases, HR actually conducts preliminary interviews with "qualified" candidates to find those they feel are not only qualified but "acceptable.  HR then forwards "qualified" and "acceptable"  candidates' resumes to the person doing the hiring.

Because HR usually has absolutely no expertise in the area of the person being hired, they look for shortcuts to winnow the huge number of resumes and apps down to a manageable number, manageable being defined as the number of folks they feel like interviewing.

If a company goes through an employment agency, they also set down criteria for the candidates they want to hire.  College degree is usually at the top of the list because it is always mentioned as "You'd expect the candidate to have a degree, right?"

Because of HR and employment agency control, the resume of an experienced professional with a great reputation in the field but no degree will be thrown out before the person hiring ever sees it.  If you are a professional without that all-important sheepskin, you had better be networking in your industry like crazy or people with hiring authority will never even know you're looking.  I have had the good fortune of hiring some great management types who lacked a degree but they never came in through HR; always because I heard about them from a friend or somebody in the department or in a professional organization who knew that the person was looking.  I always had to skirt HR to hire them.
 
2014-06-01 07:56:40 AM  

whitman00: Unions are a shell of their former selves, squabbling with each other, decreased in number, and holding little if any real power.


Considering how much money they're able to donate to the democrats every year, I'd say they've been doing better than they like to admit.
 
2014-06-01 07:56:57 AM  

Prostrate with Vast Deference: Monaro: FTFA:

As a 23-year-old in 2010, Powers realized he didn't need a college degree to be a full-time staff photographer at the Aurora Beacon News, a suburban Sun-Times paper. But in 2013, after being laid off, it turned out he needed that degree after all. He missed out on a staff photographer job because he didn't finish his degree at Western Kentucky University

Can an American Farker please explain this to me? I know you guys seem to need a college degree for any role higher than janitor over there, but why would having a degree factor at all in re-hiring for existing roles? Is it just me, or wouldn't you just keep those who have displayed the best skill for the role, growth potential, and who best fits the values of your organisation?

Hahahaha.  You're funny.  I worked for a major U.S. telecom for about 10 years - around year 9, they were trying to demote me (despite highest job performance rankings from the day I was hired) because I had the "wrong" undergraduate degree - a bachelor of arts (because I went to a liberal ARTS college) rather than a bachelor of science.  My college offered only bachelor of arts degrees, even in things like physics, chemistry, etc.  It was only through a LOT of push back from some VP-level folks that I was able to keep my job title + current pay grade.  Really crazy stuff, but completely standard around here, especially with big companies that want to standardize on a policy rather than having to use a little common sense.


At my tier 1 school you got a BA or BS in science or engineering depending on what track you were on. I have a BA in CS because I got tired of physics and differential equations and enjoyed exploring the humanities that make a well rounded person.

Big corps are foolish in many ways.
 
2014-06-01 07:57:18 AM  
letrole: even a moron can take a good picture from a moving car in the dark


ghostfacekillahrabbit: What if I'm a moron AND I suck at taking pictures tho?


I'd like you to meet Shaniqua. She's a new hire from that inner-city youth initiative that the company has become heavily invested in since the release of the first quarter earnings... She'll be working beside you for the next few weeks. Just show her all the basics, in case you're ever off sick or something and we need to be able to see that your job still gets done. Oh, and while I'm down here, I've got some paperwork from IT that needs refreshing, just the usual about acknowledging you still have possession of any company equipment like a mobile phone or a laptop. Don't worry, it's just for the hardware audit.
 
2014-06-01 08:03:37 AM  

rumpelstiltskin: Most Americans need to work in organizations, and the problem usually isn't one of capital. The problem is, they need to be told what to do. Sure, wives and girlfriends pick up the slack on the off hours, but there's only so much they can do. They have lives, too.  American men need more guidance than even the naggiest nag can provide.Land of the farking free, my ass.



And this is why being an entrepreneur has its own rewards, apart from the obvious benefit of getting to keep the profits for yourself.
 
2014-06-01 08:09:05 AM  
OscarTamerz: So this means the reporters are scabs in a good Democrat union town like Chicago. How many of them got tied to engine blocks and dropped in the Chicago river or just outright beaten to death by union thugs?
[img.fark.net image 280x210]

whitman00: Great.  A multi-decade old picture from when unions were tough and people were genuinely afraid to pay a CEO 500 to 1000x the average workers salary.  Unions are a shell of their former selves, squabbling with each other, decreased in number, and holding little if any real power.  That must mean things are better now.  Wages up.  Quality of life up.  More jobs now that we got the unions out of the way.  So, lets see some data on how great workers are doing now that the private unions are out of the way.


Union organisers think it's still 1960, and still peddle a message that's basically a retard's guide to the socialist worker's paradise. They have a enough sense to not lobby and recruit on the shop floor, so they prowl nearby coffee shops and convenience stores, where they approach fellows wearing factory gear.

The amusing thing is that organisers either get told to buck a fuzzard, or they get a good response from a fellow who's shiat at what he does and probably hates the company anyway. There is no middle ground. This happens every time.
 
2014-06-01 08:18:15 AM  
Prostrate with Vast Deference:
Really crazy stuff, but completely standard around here, especially with big companies that want to standardize on a policy rather than having to use a little common sense.

Mr. Right:
Because of HR and employment agency control, the resume of an experienced professional with a great reputation in the field but no degree will be thrown out before the person hiring ever sees it.  If you are a professional without that all-important sheepskin, you had better be networking in your industry like crazy or people with hiring authority will never even know you're looking.  I have had the good fortune of ...


Thanks for the clarifications. Sound like you have a bit of a "race to the bottom" in hiring process. Pity common sense goes out the window with it, though I guess common sense doesn't scale well! Probably why it's not so bad in NZ.

I have a lot of input in the hiring process, managing some teams and working with my peers' teams. I can say that although I've been tempted to give up and just let the HR machine go through its motions, I've always found the extra couple of days-worth of work pays dividends in who we ultimately hire. More than once I've sifted through the "junk" folder and found a gem who didn't make it past the filter, but was far superior to anyone the recruitment agency put forward.
 
2014-06-01 08:25:23 AM  

Monaro: FTFA:

As a 23-year-old in 2010, Powers realized he didn't need a college degree to be a full-time staff photographer at the Aurora Beacon News, a suburban Sun-Times paper. But in 2013, after being laid off, it turned out he needed that degree after all. He missed out on a staff photographer job because he didn't finish his degree at Western Kentucky University

Can an American Farker please explain this to me? I know you guys seem to need a college degree for any role higher than janitor over there, but why would having a degree factor at all in re-hiring for existing roles? Is it just me, or wouldn't you just keep those who have displayed the best skill for the role, growth potential, and who best fits the values of your organisation?


In essence, education gets the job and experience keeps it.

I had 10 years experience but no degree at one point.  It took me a year to find a job and that was only because I was lucky enough to have an inside contact.  If you don't meet the educational requirements today you'll never even get an interview and every job requires a degree now.
 
2014-06-01 08:36:10 AM  
img.fark.net

Most of today's jobs are going to be automated away. The "creative" jobs that were meant to replace them don't look like they will.
 
2014-06-01 08:51:08 AM  

AngryDragon: Monaro: FTFA:

As a 23-year-old in 2010, Powers realized he didn't need a college degree to be a full-time staff photographer at the Aurora Beacon News, a suburban Sun-Times paper. But in 2013, after being laid off, it turned out he needed that degree after all. He missed out on a staff photographer job because he didn't finish his degree at Western Kentucky University

Can an American Farker please explain this to me? I know you guys seem to need a college degree for any role higher than janitor over there, but why would having a degree factor at all in re-hiring for existing roles? Is it just me, or wouldn't you just keep those who have displayed the best skill for the role, growth potential, and who best fits the values of your organisation?

In essence, education gets the job and experience keeps it.

I had 10 years experience but no degree at one point.  It took me a year to find a job and that was only because I was lucky enough to have an inside contact.  If you don't meet the educational requirements today you'll never even get an interview and every job requires a degree now.


Yep. It used to be you could start at the bottom and work your way up. Not anymore there is a glass ceiling for people without degrees. My moms company just revised their rules that any new supervisor must have a degree no exceptions. So once those old timers are gone everyone one of them will have to come from college. And this is just a small factory. No longer can a blue collar work their way up to a white collar job regardless of talent or experience. Partly why I'm trying to go back to school. A college degree is what a high school diploma used to be. A requirement for almost any job these days.
 
2014-06-01 08:59:25 AM  

Monaro: FTFA:

As a 23-year-old in 2010, Powers realized he didn't need a college degree to be a full-time staff photographer at the Aurora Beacon News, a suburban Sun-Times paper. But in 2013, after being laid off, it turned out he needed that degree after all. He missed out on a staff photographer job because he didn't finish his degree at Western Kentucky University

Can an American Farker please explain this to me? I know you guys seem to need a college degree for any role higher than janitor over there, but why would having a degree factor at all in re-hiring for existing roles? Is it just me, or wouldn't you just keep those who have displayed the best skill for the role, growth potential, and who best fits the values of your organisation?


Previous generations had some really stupid ideas like "everybody should own a home", "I've gotten where I am entirely on my own" and "everybody should go to college".  They built social and political policies based on these ideas, then poured in money to try to make them come true.

Just like we had a housing bubble, we've got an "education bubble" that hasn't been allowed to explode.  Impressionable kids have been told that they have to get a college degree and have been given insane loans to make sure they can.  This has created a glut of money available to colleges and universities, resulting in rising prices and quite a few new institutions being created (relatively new, academia measures age in decades, not years).  Often times the actual quality of education received at these institutions is questionable.

Meanwhile, due to a number of factors, education standards have fallen across the country in both primary and secondary education.  So, a Bachelor degree is much more common to have and means less than it would have 40 or 50 years ago.  You can get away without one if you have connections to help you land a job, but otherwise you're probably applying for work at a large corporation or government institution.  These jobs are filtered by bureaucrats or computers before anybody is interviewed, and resumes without minimum paper work (X degree, Y certification) get tossed.

Now, the photographers in the article probably all could have landed jobs in our market if they had thought a bit outside the box.  One of my former coworkers was a graphic designer who did some freelance photography, he's managed to land job for a fashion company where he can leverage both skills.  I have another friend who spent 5 years at a crappy job, but made sure to make as many connections as he could and now is making a fair amount of money as a freelancer.  Shoot, if you're near retirement age go snap some quality photos and sell them on stock photography sites.
 
2014-06-01 09:09:22 AM  

Lsherm: Four were effectively forced into early retirement. Said 61-year-old Ernie Torres, who worked at the Sun-Times for four decades: "I've kinda hung up the camera right now." Having time off with his grandchildren has been "fantastic," but his unemployment checks have run out, so he's going to start looking for a way to supplement his wife's income.

This terrifies me.


Liberals told me people on unemployment want to work. This asshole waited til the checks stopped
 
2014-06-01 09:11:51 AM  
This shot from Andrew Renneisen of Clara Gantt, the widow of SFC Joseph Gantt who's remains are now being returned from Korea 63 years after the war:
img.fark.net

Would not be shot from some reporter or blogger with a cellphone. Why?
Modern pro dSLRs are great in low light. ISO of 25k+!! Try that with a phone (which, while worlds better than they were have nothing on a pro or prosumer dSLR in low light)
Also, try stopping action with a cellphone. And chances are that most reporters will miss the action anyway because the phone is usually in the pocket or hip holster.

But no one will care. Because in this age of bathroom selfies and Worldstar no one values riveting photojournalism that elicits emotion. Hell, most Americans don't know good photography from shiatty photography anyway. And the Chicago Sun-Times knows that.
 
2014-06-01 09:25:48 AM  

nightbringerggz: Previous generations had some really stupid ideas like "everybody should own a home",

nightbringerggz: Shoot, if you're near retirement age go snap some quality photos and sell them on stock photography sites.



But you just said buying a house was a stupid idea, and for somebody approaching retirement you offer a genuinely stupid idea that's one step above washing windscreens at a stoplight for spare change.


It's one step above because people don't honk their horns or curse at you when you upload photographs. Otherwise, it's exactly the same.
 
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