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(Seven Days)   Best quote from an article about pierogies this week: "Psychopaths and criminal behavior and mental illness is so fascinating," she says with a wistful smile. "At work it's never a dull moment"   (sevendaysvt.com ) divider line
    More: Interesting, Josh Bloomberg, South Burlington, mac and cheese, forensic psychologist  
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2969 clicks; posted to Main » on 30 May 2014 at 10:42 AM (1 year ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-05-30 08:38:23 AM  
Great, now I want pierogies.
 
2014-05-30 09:45:16 AM  
Growing up with Polish grandparents I've enjoyed made from stratch pierogies for over 44 years.

I learned to make them from my father. I will never get tired of them. EVER!
 
2014-05-30 10:48:33 AM  
Pierogi.  That's the plural.

/amazingly, TFA gets it right
//the seldom-used singular is pierog
 
2014-05-30 10:52:07 AM  
Now I'm hungry.
 
2014-05-30 10:59:32 AM  
i1.ytimg.com

/too lazy to find a better pic
 
2014-05-30 11:01:50 AM  
Am I the only one who read that as "pie orgies"?
 
2014-05-30 11:02:50 AM  
Sounds like the late Molly Ivans referring to state politics
 
2014-05-30 11:04:23 AM  
Ivins. Beh.
 
2014-05-30 11:05:02 AM  
I had too google what those were. They sound delicious.
 
2014-05-30 11:05:42 AM  
static.comicvine.com
Her other job...
 
2014-05-30 11:07:09 AM  
 "Bloomberg's barszcz shares that appealing zip..." also caught my attention. I bet it does, if you know what I'm sayin'.
 
2014-05-30 11:07:27 AM  
That article was, alas, not about pierogi, it was an article about a woman who happens to make pierogi. Way to get my hopes up, subby.
 
2014-05-30 11:09:00 AM  

Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: [static.comicvine.com image 312x400]
Her other job...


Beat me to it in the time it took to find an image.
 
2014-05-30 11:09:52 AM  

strangeguitar: Growing up with Polish grandparents I've enjoyed made from stratch pierogies for over 44 years.

I learned to make them from my father. I will never get tired of them. EVER!


Grandpa was a Polack and made them from scratch, too.. Filled with cheese, onion, potato, and pan-fried in bacon grease..

Now I'm really hungry!!
 
2014-05-30 11:13:58 AM  
I grew up in Elizabeth, NJ, when it was still evenly split between the Irish & Polish sides of town, and we
always had the best pierogis.
 
2014-05-30 11:14:14 AM  
You know what's interesting to me about pierogis is that my grandmother Adeline Wdoviak came here from Poland and made pierogis all her life.  But we only ever had them filled with fried, buttered cabbage.  Not sauerkraut, not potatoes, cheese, mushrooms or meat.  She would chop cabbage and fry it up with salt and pepper in about a pound of butter and fill the pierogis.  AND we never ever ever pan fried them.  We boiled them and drowned them in more butter so they were kind of like raviolis.  Now when I make them from scratch (usually only in the winter) I'm told I'm "doing it wrong" and "not really making pierogis".  THE WOMAN WAS FROM POLAND.
 
2014-05-30 11:25:29 AM  
So good you could plotz.
 
2014-05-30 11:25:53 AM  

DjangoStonereaver: I grew up in Elizabeth, NJ, when it was still evenly split between the Irish & Polish sides of town, and we
always had the best pierogis.


Yeah, but Wednesday night was still Prince Spaghetti Night, right?
 
2014-05-30 11:26:35 AM  

Capo Del Bandito: I had too google what those were. They sound delicious.


In a thread full of people whose last name ends with 'ski' this may come across as blasphemous but even the ones that you buy frozen in a box at every grocery store are really really good. Just fry them in a pan until golden and top off with sour cream.
 
2014-05-30 11:30:10 AM  

teenytinycornteeth: You know what's interesting to me about pierogis is that my grandmother Adeline Wdoviak came here from Poland and made pierogis all her life.  But we only ever had them filled with fried, buttered cabbage.  Not sauerkraut, not potatoes, cheese, mushrooms or meat.  She would chop cabbage and fry it up with salt and pepper in about a pound of butter and fill the pierogis.  AND we never ever ever pan fried them.  We boiled them and drowned them in more butter so they were kind of like raviolis.  Now when I make them from scratch (usually only in the winter) I'm told I'm "doing it wrong" and "not really making pierogis".  THE WOMAN WAS FROM POLAND.


Now, this is interesting:  my Polish-born great grandmother (who taught both my father & mother how to
make various Polish delicacies like gwempki) always pan-fried them straight off, no boiling them first.
Granted, she didn't make them from scratch (as I said above, there were lots of good pierogi sources in
Elizabeth NJ at the time), but when my own wife would boil them before frying them I was always confused.

I'd put it all up to regional variations of the basic cuisine.

Also, growing up we only ever had potato-filled ones, with the occasional cottage-cheese filled ones
(which I never really cottoned to), but that is obviously a question of my father's tastes.
 
2014-05-30 11:31:19 AM  

Saners: Capo Del Bandito: I had too google what those were. They sound delicious.

In a thread full of people whose last name ends with 'ski' this may come across as blasphemous but even the ones that you buy frozen in a box at every grocery store are really really good. Just fry them in a pan until golden and top off with sour cream.


I've eaten a few good frozen pierogis.  But every town has a polish deli.  I'm sure you can just go and pick up three or sixteen dozen and enjoy them this weekend.  My dad and his brothers used to have contests when grandma made them for sunday dinner. I think my dad came in second with 23.
 
2014-05-30 11:34:35 AM  

DjangoStonereaver: teenytinycornteeth: You know what's interesting to me about pierogis is that my grandmother Adeline Wdoviak came here from Poland and made pierogis all her life.  But we only ever had them filled with fried, buttered cabbage.  Not sauerkraut, not potatoes, cheese, mushrooms or meat.  She would chop cabbage and fry it up with salt and pepper in about a pound of butter and fill the pierogis.  AND we never ever ever pan fried them.  We boiled them and drowned them in more butter so they were kind of like raviolis.  Now when I make them from scratch (usually only in the winter) I'm told I'm "doing it wrong" and "not really making pierogis".  THE WOMAN WAS FROM POLAND.

Now, this is interesting:  my Polish-born great grandmother (who taught both my father & mother how to
make various Polish delicacies like gwempki) always pan-fried them straight off, no boiling them first.
Granted, she didn't make them from scratch (as I said above, there were lots of good pierogi sources in
Elizabeth NJ at the time), but when my own wife would boil them before frying them I was always confused.

I'd put it all up to regional variations of the basic cuisine.

Also, growing up we only ever had potato-filled ones, with the occasional cottage-cheese filled ones
(which I never really cottoned to), but that is obviously a question of my father's tastes.


We called gwempki GALUMPKIS.  They were always served with the pierogis.  And for breakfast grandma always made a really eggy slightly sweet polish bread with raisins in it that she called Plozack, but I'm sure there's a real word for it.
 
2014-05-30 11:35:33 AM  

Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: Great, now I want pierogies.


see my bio..  any other ___kowski last names in Fark?  in Russian my mother said it was ___kashka.

psychopaths, the criminally insane, and pierogies... count me in!  (loves pierogies) I've found one good frozen brand with mushroom duxelle inside for those 30 minute meal nights... yum

http://alexandrapierogi.com/pierogi.php
 
2014-05-30 11:37:19 AM  

frontwheeldriver: Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: Great, now I want pierogies.

see my bio..  any other ___kowski last names in Fark?  in Russian my mother said it was ___kashka.

psychopaths, the criminally insane, and pierogies... count me in!  (loves pierogies) I've found one good frozen brand with mushroom duxelle inside for those 30 minute meal nights... yum

http://alexandrapierogi.com/pierogi.php


Alexandra makes great pierogis and blintzes.  in fact, they're the only company that makes the plain fried cabbage ones like my grandmother. I've never seen them anywhere else.
 
2014-05-30 11:44:04 AM  
img.fark.netteenytinycornteeth: frontwheeldriver: Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: Great, now I want pierogies.

see my bio..  any other ___kowski last names in Fark?  in Russian my mother said it was ___kashka.

psychopaths, the criminally insane, and pierogies... count me in!  (loves pierogies) I've found one good frozen brand with mushroom duxelle inside for those 30 minute meal nights... yum

http://alexandrapierogi.com/pierogi.php

Alexandra makes great pierogis and blintzes.  in fact, they're the only company that makes the plain fried cabbage ones like my grandmother. I've never seen them anywhere else.


yay for the Sausage Chalet
 
2014-05-30 11:53:52 AM  
I wish I'd had a Polish grandmother instead of a native american (lumber camp whore). Sure, it's nice to have a permanent tan, but grampa ate whatever shiat was put in front of him. Some how both of my grand mothers were 60s era school lunch ladies.
 
2014-05-30 11:57:00 AM  

frontwheeldriver: yay for the Sausage Chalet


Sounds like a place where dudes wander around in nothing but crotchless lederhosen, smearing patrons with smoked pork fat (Schmalz).
 
2014-05-30 12:03:07 PM  
Spoken like a psychologist.
 
2014-05-30 12:50:54 PM  
I've seen cheddar cheese filled perogie. Sacrilege!!!!
 
2014-05-30 12:56:35 PM  

teenytinycornteeth: You know what's interesting to me about pierogis is that my grandmother Adeline Wdoviak came here from Poland and made pierogis all her life.  But we only ever had them filled with fried, buttered cabbage.  Not sauerkraut, not potatoes, cheese, mushrooms or meat.  She would chop cabbage and fry it up with salt and pepper in about a pound of butter and fill the pierogis.  AND we never ever ever pan fried them.  We boiled them and drowned them in more butter so they were kind of like raviolis.  Now when I make them from scratch (usually only in the winter) I'm told I'm "doing it wrong" and "not really making pierogis".  THE WOMAN WAS FROM POLAND.


Boiling pierogi and serving them with melted butter to pour over them is also how my Polish-descended family makes them.
 
2014-05-30 01:00:11 PM  
img.fark.net
....Lucky Bastard!

/Dinsdale?
 
2014-05-30 01:30:31 PM  
THE WHITING PIEROGI FEST
Coming up soon! I'll be there... always a good time
Link
 
2014-05-30 01:37:22 PM  

shortdarkandmeh: Am I the only one who read that as "pie orgies"?


No.
i1134.photobucket.com
 
2014-05-30 01:48:36 PM  

teenytinycornteeth: We called gwempki GALUMPKIS.


I gather grape leaves all summer and freeze them in ziplock baggies.
 
2014-05-30 01:58:28 PM  

vudukungfu: teenytinycornteeth: We called gwempki GALUMPKIS.

I gather grape leaves all summer and freeze them in ziplock baggies.


Wait what?  We use cabbage leaves. WHY DO PEOPLE DO THINKS DIFFERENTLY MY LIFE IS TOPSY TURVY
 
2014-05-30 02:11:03 PM  
Great with sour cream and zaprushka (caramelized onions).
 
2014-05-30 02:51:29 PM  

teenytinycornteeth: vudukungfu: teenytinycornteeth: We called gwempki GALUMPKIS.

I gather grape leaves all summer and freeze them in ziplock baggies.

Wait what?  We use cabbage leaves. WHY DO PEOPLE DO THINKS DIFFERENTLY MY LIFE IS TOPSY TURVY


Greek/ Polish.
One does it one way, One another.
Cabbage leaves are good.
So are grapes.
Grape leaves leave you less gassy.
 
2014-05-30 03:17:51 PM  

Pants full of macaroni!!: Pierogi.  That's the plural.

/amazingly, TFA gets it right
//the seldom-used singular is pierog


My Polish friend corrects people for that and Pączki.

I say 'pierogies' every so often to kid around with her.
 
2014-05-30 03:21:56 PM  

CrazyGerbilLady: teenytinycornteeth: You know what's interesting to me about pierogis is that my grandmother Adeline Wdoviak came here from Poland and made pierogis all her life.  But we only ever had them filled with fried, buttered cabbage.  Not sauerkraut, not potatoes, cheese, mushrooms or meat.  She would chop cabbage and fry it up with salt and pepper in about a pound of butter and fill the pierogis.  AND we never ever ever pan fried them.  We boiled them and drowned them in more butter so they were kind of like raviolis.  Now when I make them from scratch (usually only in the winter) I'm told I'm "doing it wrong" and "not really making pierogis".  THE WOMAN WAS FROM POLAND.

Boiling pierogi and serving them with melted butter to pour over them is also how my Polish-descended family makes them.


Sacrilege! My (immigrant) Polish friend insists on cutting up bacon into rough squares, some onion, a little garlic and cooking that for a bit. Then she puts the homemade pierogi in with the bacon to cook. Mmm, bacon and homemade pierogi. Tastes almost as good as she does.
 
2014-05-30 04:00:58 PM  

inglixthemad: CrazyGerbilLady: teenytinycornteeth: You know what's interesting to me about pierogis is that my grandmother Adeline Wdoviak came here from Poland and made pierogis all her life.  But we only ever had them filled with fried, buttered cabbage.  Not sauerkraut, not potatoes, cheese, mushrooms or meat.  She would chop cabbage and fry it up with salt and pepper in about a pound of butter and fill the pierogis.  AND we never ever ever pan fried them.  We boiled them and drowned them in more butter so they were kind of like raviolis.  Now when I make them from scratch (usually only in the winter) I'm told I'm "doing it wrong" and "not really making pierogis".  THE WOMAN WAS FROM POLAND.

Boiling pierogi and serving them with melted butter to pour over them is also how my Polish-descended family makes them.

Sacrilege! My (immigrant) Polish friend insists on cutting up bacon into rough squares, some onion, a little garlic and cooking that for a bit. Then she puts the homemade pierogi in with the bacon to cook. Mmm, bacon and homemade pierogi. Tastes almost as good as she does.


See, this is what pisses me off.  It's not sacrilege.  It's how I grew up eating them and I love them and my grandmother was Polish FROM POLAND so I highly doubt she just came up with the idea in her head.  I'm not "doing it wrong" or "not really polish", it's just different.
 
2014-05-30 06:29:27 PM  
This is actually the first time I've ever heard that not frying pierogi can be considered "wrong". I'd always assumed there were just different ways of doing it. In fact, I've always explained to people that boiling them and pouring butter over them is traditional.

My grandparents were also from Poland. In fact, they came over to Canada along with my infant mother. It is possible that the "normal" way to make pierogi in Poland has changed over the course of 65 years or so. I know my Polish (from Poland) cousin said, when she was visiting, that my mom's kisiel (a Jello-like dessert made with starch instead of gelatin) was very weird and not at all like the kisiel she was used to, but also that she'd never seen it made from scratch before, as apparently most people in Poland buy it in a powedered form like Jello.

If my family is anything to go by, though, there's no sense arguing over the proper way to make "traditional" Polish food. Every family thinks their way is the right one. 

My family also uses Cheddar cheese when they make cheese pierogi, and they also make blueberry pierogi, which stems from their having immigrated to Northern Ontario where blueberries were plentiful and free if you could be bothered to go out in the woods to pick them. I doubt my grandmother ever made blueberry pierogi while she was living in Poland, but that doesn't mean they're "wrong".
 
2014-05-30 07:57:54 PM  

kimwim: I've seen cheddar cheese filled perogie. Sacrilege!!!!


That actually sounds quite yummy, much better than the cottage cheese I was exposed to as a child.

Although.... swiss cheese/gouda with onions might be good as well.
 
2014-05-30 09:29:02 PM  

CrazyGerbilLady: This is actually the first time I've ever heard that not frying pierogi can be considered "wrong". I'd always assumed there were just different ways of doing it. In fact, I've always explained to people that boiling them and pouring butter over them is traditional.
...

My family also uses Cheddar cheese when they make cheese pierogi, and they also make blueberry pierogi, which stems from their having immigrated to Northern Ontario where blueberries were plentiful and free if you could be bothered to go out in the woods to pick them. I doubt my grandmother ever made blueberry pierogi while she was living in Poland, but that doesn't mean they're "wrong".


Actually, there's an excellent German grocery store/deli here in Chicago that makes blueberry pierogi.  they sort of remind me of blintzes.  Very tasty!
 
2014-05-30 11:53:37 PM  
Being from Winnipeg, I've eaten a lot of pierogi, and I love the little cheesy-potatoey things with sour cream and crumbled bacon - but I've never had any that sounded as good as those made by this talented lady.

I wonder if she delivers to Canada?
 
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