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(Some Guy)   Scientists regain contact with the long lost ISEE-3 spacecraft, show a stunning lack of awareness that these things always end badly in SciFi stories   (spacecollege.org) divider line 52
    More: Cool, International Sun/Earth Explorer 3, unconsciousnesses, spacecrafts, two-way communication, Morehead State, Arecibo, SETI Institute, NASA Headquarters  
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3764 clicks; posted to Geek » on 29 May 2014 at 11:22 PM (25 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-05-29 08:06:13 PM  
"What too you so long?"
 
2014-05-29 08:07:16 PM  
Razzn frazzn....

www.startrek.com
 
2014-05-29 08:51:39 PM  
www.badhaven.com

You can't leave. ISEE-3 won't let you.
 
2014-05-29 09:02:25 PM  
We hear you. We are coming.

/our wish is to serve man
 
2014-05-29 09:09:37 PM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: We hear you. We are coming.

/our wish is to serve man


+1  I LOL'd.
 
2014-05-29 09:43:19 PM  
Send more Chuck Berry
 
2014-05-29 11:25:03 PM  
img.photobucket.com
 
2014-05-29 11:44:27 PM  

Notabunny: [img.photobucket.com image 752x800]


601
601
601
601
 
2014-05-29 11:49:04 PM  
So I feel retarded because I don't recognize ANY of the references in this thread. Guess I need to watch more movies or read more books.
 
2014-05-29 11:53:35 PM  

Master Jason: So I feel retarded because I don't recognize ANY of the references in this thread. Guess I need to watch more movies or read more books.


Really? Not even obliquely?
 
2014-05-29 11:56:59 PM  
This thing was launched in 1978. Link

Dayum!

/I wasn't even born till 1993.
//Getting off your lawn now.
 
2014-05-30 12:01:56 AM  
Did I read the article right?  Are we really letting a university in Kentucky have spacecraft?  This can't end well.  Unless they find a way to age bourbon faster, then I'm ok with it.
 
2014-05-30 12:06:34 AM  

Notabunny: [img.photobucket.com image 752x800]


MaudlinMutantMollusk: Notabunny: [img.photobucket.com image 752x800]

601
601
601
601


i291.photobucket.com

Thank you fellow 40+ GenXer's.....
 
2014-05-30 12:06:51 AM  
Check out the original mission trajectory at the Wikipedia page::

upload.wikimedia.org

It's amazing some guy figured out this trajectory back in 1978 -- I don't care how powerful a computer you have, simply imagining this kind of maneuvering is even possible is impressive.
 
2014-05-30 12:07:55 AM  

Master Jason: So I feel retarded because I don't recognize ANY of the references in this thread. Guess I need to watch more movies or read more books.


DjangoStonereaver: Razzn frazzn....

[www.startrek.com image 320x240]


It's a trek to the stars

miss diminutive: [www.badhaven.com image 462x265]


to see the event on the horizon

Notabunny: [img.photobucket.com image 752x800]


without the strain from Andromeda
 
2014-05-30 12:13:25 AM  

Summer Glau's Love Slave: This thing was launched in 1978. Link

Dayum!

/I wasn't even born till 1993.
//Getting off your lawn now.


Then I am sorry, all you get is this:
d37wxxhohlp07s.cloudfront.net


Now, for the grown folks: anyone else remember this guy?
s2.hubimg.com
 
2014-05-30 12:15:24 AM  

Mr. Oizo: Check out the original mission trajectory at the Wikipedia page::

[upload.wikimedia.org image 710x557]

It's amazing some guy figured out this trajectory back in 1978 -- I don't care how powerful a computer you have, simply imagining this kind of maneuvering is even possible is impressive.


I read an earlier article that said the guy who plotted it was pretty famous for crazy/genius trajectories.  Back then computers could only do so much, it's amazing that any human mind could figure it out much less get it to work.
 
2014-05-30 12:16:50 AM  
Obligatory xkcd:
imgs.xkcd.com

/1337
 
2014-05-30 12:31:12 AM  
Hot damn, that hunk of space junk is almost as old as I am.

Rock on!
 
2014-05-30 12:38:12 AM  

zjbs14: Obligatory xkcd:
[imgs.xkcd.com image 740x961]

/1337


i291.photobucket.com

Bon(er)us:

i291.photobucket.com
 
2014-05-30 01:00:40 AM  

Thanks for the Meme-ries: /1337


lol koolz and jolt and h4x0r teh gibson

/favorite hacking movie
//contains no actual hacking
///love it anyway
 
2014-05-30 01:20:30 AM  
Good for them, and good for the original probe engineering and construction.  They don't build them like that anymore.
 
2014-05-30 01:41:24 AM  

Summer Glau's Love Slave: This thing was launched in 1978. Link

Dayum!

/I wasn't even born till 1993.
//Getting off your lawn now.


I have a 15 year old indoor-outdoor cat that gives the feral kittens a "get off my lawn" growl. She's just recently started to show her age, up until recently she could run up the fence to chase cats. Now I see the kittens within 15 feet of her.
 
2014-05-30 02:00:17 AM  

Daedalus27: They don't build them like that anymore.


Giant rover.  Rocket powered skycrane.   Mars.
 
2014-05-30 03:28:57 AM  

Cpl.D: /favorite hacking movie
//contains no actual hacking
///love it anyway


I'd put it in third place behind WarGames and Sneakers but otherwise, not too bad.  The Net and Swordfish however both should be erased from history.
 
2014-05-30 07:36:17 AM  
ISEE-3 of him!
www.hollywoodmemorabilia.com
 
2014-05-30 08:22:30 AM  

Ambivalence: Mr. Oizo: Check out the original mission trajectory at the Wikipedia page::

[upload.wikimedia.org image 710x557]

It's amazing some guy figured out this trajectory back in 1978 -- I don't care how powerful a computer you have, simply imagining this kind of maneuvering is even possible is impressive.

I read an earlier article that said the guy who plotted it was pretty famous for crazy/genius trajectories.  Back then computers could only do so much, it's amazing that any human mind could figure it out much less get it to work.


I s this the satalite the guy "hijacked?" if so.. he's putting it back wherehe found it.
 
2014-05-30 08:23:53 AM  

Mr. Oizo: Check out the original mission trajectory at the Wikipedia page::



It's amazing some guy figured out this trajectory back in 1978 -- I don't care how powerful a computer you have, simply imagining this kind of maneuvering is even possible is impressive.


I'm not sure you could even do that in Kerbal

/Ain't no crazy like NASA crazy
 
2014-05-30 08:29:57 AM  

Ambivalence: It's amazing some guy figured out this trajectory back in 1978 -- I don't care how powerful a computer you have, simply imagining this kind of maneuvering is even possible is impressive.

I read an earlier article that said the guy who plotted it was pretty famous for crazy/genius trajectories.  Back then computers could only do so much, it's amazing that any human mind could figure it out much less get it to work.


Yeah, what was his name? Wili something?

/Celest FTW
 
2014-05-30 08:44:49 AM  

Ghost Roach: Mr. Oizo: Check out the original mission trajectory at the Wikipedia page::

It's amazing some guy figured out this trajectory back in 1978 -- I don't care how powerful a computer you have, simply imagining this kind of maneuvering is even possible is impressive.

I'm not sure you could even do that in Kerbal

/Ain't no crazy like NASA crazy


As nice as KSP is, it's actually quite limited and there's a lot it can't do. Things like Lagrangian points and n-body simulation are right out.
 
2014-05-30 09:05:28 AM  
cfile8.uf.tistory.com
 
2014-05-30 09:20:35 AM  

jfarkinB: Ambivalence: It's amazing some guy figured out this trajectory back in 1978 -- I don't care how powerful a computer you have, simply imagining this kind of maneuvering is even possible is impressive.

I read an earlier article that said the guy who plotted it was pretty famous for crazy/genius trajectories.  Back then computers could only do so much, it's amazing that any human mind could figure it out much less get it to work.

Yeah, what was his name? Wili something?

/Celest FTW


HIs name is Robert Farquhar and he figured out that trajectory in 1983-ish, after ISEE-3's original mission was complete.  *That's* when he, and others, sent it off on a course to intercept 2 separate comets.  It became the first spacecraft to fly through the tail of a comet, confirming that comets are pretty much dirty iceballs.

/submitted exactly the same link with an apparently less attractive headline:

"Oh, no, hijacked again? ISEE-3 spacecraft taken over by a ragtag band of nerds "
 
2014-05-30 10:39:56 AM  

Big Merl: Did I read the article right?  Are we really letting a university in Kentucky have spacecraft?  This can't end well.  Unless they find a way to age bourbon faster, then I'm ok with it.


Orbital mechanics are a lot like basketball.
 
2014-05-30 10:40:57 AM  

Mr. Oizo: Check out the original mission trajectory at the Wikipedia page::

[upload.wikimedia.org image 710x557]

It's amazing some guy figured out this trajectory back in 1978 -- I don't care how powerful a computer you have, simply imagining this kind of maneuvering is even possible is impressive.


I don't know, it looks very similar to the maneuvers my wife uses in a shoe store.
 
2014-05-30 11:11:14 AM  
I gave like, ten bucks to make this happen. Awesome that it actually is happening :).
 
2014-05-30 11:18:59 AM  

Big Merl: Did I read the article right?  Are we really letting a university in Kentucky have spacecraft?  This can't end well.  Unless they find a way to age bourbon faster, then I'm ok with it.


New Fark Server.
 
2014-05-30 11:23:58 AM  

bmckenna: I gave like, ten bucks to make this happen. Awesome that it actually is happening :).


Me too.  My brother gave $50.  I was hopeful, but dubious at first, then I saw they had help from Ettus Research and became very hopeful.

This IS awesome!
 
2014-05-30 12:41:43 PM  

Brainsick: Summer Glau's Love Slave: This thing was launched in 1978. Link

Dayum!

/I wasn't even born till 1993.
//Getting off your lawn now.

Then I am sorry, all you get is this:
[d37wxxhohlp07s.cloudfront.net image 490x348]


Now, for the grown folks: anyone else remember this guy?
[s2.hubimg.com image 260x481]


I have absolutely no idea what either of those images represent.

/Norman, coordinate?.
//Shazbot!
 
2014-05-30 02:07:38 PM  

ampoliros: Ghost Roach: Mr. Oizo: Check out the original mission trajectory at the Wikipedia page::

It's amazing some guy figured out this trajectory back in 1978 -- I don't care how powerful a computer you have, simply imagining this kind of maneuvering is even possible is impressive.

I'm not sure you could even do that in Kerbal

/Ain't no crazy like NASA crazy

As nice as KSP is, it's actually quite limited and there's a lot it can't do. Things like Lagrangian points and n-body simulation are right out.


Actually some guy has already made an n-body physics mod for KSP but it`s not released to the public yet though. Lagrange points are an emergent behaviour from proper n-body modelling.
 
2014-05-30 02:25:03 PM  

Kanemano: Master Jason: So I feel retarded because I don't recognize ANY of the references in this thread. Guess I need to watch more movies or read more books.

DjangoStonereaver: Razzn frazzn....

[www.startrek.com image 320x240]

It's a trek to the stars

miss diminutive: [www.badhaven.com image 462x265]

to see the event on the horizon

Notabunny: [img.photobucket.com image 752x800]

without the strain from Andromeda


You are supposed to put all those references hidden in one huge paragraph text wall, so we can spend several minutes of work time finding them!   What kind of farker are you, anyway!  :)
 
2014-05-30 02:30:37 PM  

Cpl.D: Daedalus27: They don't build them like that anymore.

Giant rover.  Rocket powered skycrane.   Mars.


While those are all sturdy well built and long lasting designs, this is in a different level.  The probe completed it's primary mission 30 years ago, completed a secondary mission 14 years ago and was parked, and is now preparing to do yet another mission.   Don't get me wrong, it is amazing that Opportunity and Spirit before they passed took a 90 day mission exploring Mars and are continuing to this day (or lasted 6 years in Spirit's case). I just think we don't see the overengineering at the same level because so many of the challenges these instruments face are known quantities so contractors build to the level they need to in order to save money and fatten their profit margins.
 
2014-05-30 04:49:40 PM  
No problem. We'll send Baltar over to make sure it's safe.
 
2014-05-30 05:55:19 PM  

EngineerAU: Cpl.D: /favorite hacking movie
//contains no actual hacking
///love it anyway

I'd put it in third place behind WarGames and Sneakers but otherwise, not too bad.  The Net and Swordfish however both should be erased from history.


Meh.  Ever see Wargames 2?  "If we shoot out the glass, it'll overheat and force a prompt."  At least Hackers at least tried to involve something pretending to be hacking in a hacking movie.
 
2014-05-30 06:14:55 PM  
images.spaceref.com

OUT.

STANDING.
 
2014-05-30 06:29:23 PM  
If they fix the N-body model issues with KSP I might just buy it.
 
2014-05-30 06:40:33 PM  
img.fark.net

Go home, satellite.  You're drunk.
 
2014-05-30 07:00:43 PM  

studebaker hoch: If they fix the N-body model issues with KSP I might just buy it.


Don't make that mistake.  Don't think just because they use spheres of influence that it's somehow watered down or easy.

It's worth it.  Take it from me, for however you might value that.  If at all.  Get the demo.  See how easy it is to get to the Mun.  You'll see.
 
2014-05-30 07:37:32 PM  

Thanks for the Meme-ries: Notabunny: [img.photobucket.com image 752x800]

MaudlinMutantMollusk: Notabunny: [img.photobucket.com image 752x800]

601
601
601
601



Thank you fellow 40+ GenXer's.....


Have you ordered up a 7-12?

/My favorite science fiction book of all time. When asked to do a book report on any book, I think I did one every year from 5th through 11th grade.
//Unlike Jeremy Stone, I don't know everything, but I am pretty much fascinated by the rest.
 
2014-05-30 09:59:38 PM  

MBrady: at least the spacecraft is running DOS 1.0 or C64 assembly language, so there is no chance of the BSOD.


Not so fast......

i291.photobucket.com
 
2014-05-30 11:40:28 PM  
So how much delta V does that thing have left in the tanks?
 
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