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(ThinkGeek)   Fark Food Thread: Aside from knives and cooking vessels, what are some of your 'go to' kitchen utensils? What is notable about them that other Farkers should consider over similar utensils? Does the form matter as much as the function?   (thinkgeek.com ) divider line
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1565 clicks; posted to Main » on 29 May 2014 at 5:00 PM (1 year ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-05-29 09:20:39 PM  
SFSailor:
peacheslatour: lol.  My hubby and I have the same deal- I cook he cleans up.

Unless he enjoys cleaning as much as you enjoy cooking, THIS IS NOT A DEAL.  I've seen more than one divorce bubble up fundamentally driven in large part by this "deal."  Cleaning farking sucks, especially if the "cook" "enjoys" USING EVERY DAMNED UTENSIL IN THE KITCHEN POINTLESSLY, THOUGHTLESSLY, AND INSENSITIVELY, CREATING WAY MORE MESS THAN NECESSARY.

"I cook, you clean" is the most self-serving, stupid "deal" one half can inflict on the couple, unless the interests are exactly opposite -- one hates cooking and loves cleaning, and 't'other hates cleaning and loves cooking... but that's rare.  Usually, one "loves" cooking, and the other is stuck with "I cooked -- you clean."  And that is flat out messed up bullshiat that will silently seethe and build contempt until one day *bam* done.

Pet peave.  Your husband won't tell you.  I just did.


No. I clean as I go. The only thing he has to do  is wash a pot.  We both load the dishwasher- he rinses, I load.  Plus the only thing he knows how to cook is breakfast.  Cold cereal and toast.
/ We've been happily married for thirty four years.
 
2014-05-29 09:33:27 PM  

flucto: softshoes: +1 My ex listed it on her side of the property settlement, non-negotiable

THAT BIATCH/DICK. I am totally on your side on this one. Solidarity, brother/sister


She's the biatch, according to her I'm the dick. In all fairness to her I'd never heard of a Vitamix till I met her and her mother gave it to us for a wedding present. A pretty big present back in the 70's. That didn't stop me from wanting to fly out the door with it at the end. As I said all's well now I have one and the gadget I treasure above all others.
 
2014-05-29 09:35:47 PM  

softshoes: back in the 70's.


*TEAM GEEZER*  - but get off my lawn.

//fistbump
 
2014-05-29 09:42:16 PM  
img.fark.net

/Can't believe I'm the first with this.
 
2014-05-29 10:27:44 PM  
locking tongs - not much you can't do with them.  I actually prefer my cheap supply store version better than my sexy OXO tongs.  indispensable tool.

microplane (fine and coarse) - quite simply the best quality graters I've come across.  you'd be surprised how much you'd use them adding a quick flavor boost from some citrus zest or fresh ground spice.  even little touches like chocolate shavings to desserts and beverages don't take any real skill to add but enhance look and flavor with minimal effort.

coffee grinder (for spice mixes and rubs, err... and coffee) - I've mixed spices by hand but I've been using the grinder more lately for uniformity, in both mixing and coarseness, and I've been liking it.

mortar and pestle (mexican molcajete) - will add a whole new dimension to your cooking.

Jaccard Supertendermatic (48 blade meat tenderizer) - once you've used one you can't go back.  I gotta thank Will Harris from White Oak Pastures for the tip.

marinade injector - still more novelty than necessity to me but you'll never eat boring meat again.  if I lose one I find myself eventually replacing it.

instant read digital thermometer - I can pretty much touch test most cuts of meat for doneness or knife check poultry, but the instant read is a good backup for when I'm cooking something I'm less familiar with.

beer can chicken rack - just do it.
 
2014-05-29 10:40:42 PM  
My Kitchen Aid stand mixer, biatches.
 
2014-05-29 10:51:08 PM  

DGS: flucto: big-ass enameled cast iron pots with lids

We recently got an enameled cast-iron dutch oven. 5 qt I think. It's fantastic.. finally wifey can make plov. And I did duck legs for the first time. Being able to cook and then transition a pot straight to the oven is sweet.


Ok, I know I'm really late to the thread, but can you please post your plov recipe? We had an exchange student from Turkmenistan a few years ago, and I could never find a plov recipe that turned out right.

He said my somsas and manti were delicious, though.
 
2014-05-29 11:14:40 PM  
Oh, I just remembered: a digital timer. I can't imagine cooking without one.
 
2014-05-29 11:16:03 PM  
I'm a little late to the party here, but I'll add mine.

Micro planer
Kitchen Aid stand mixer
Vacuum sealer
Immersion blender
Pasta roller- love me some fresh pasta

Surprised to see such reverence for the garlic press. And it seems like I've had more luck than others with the KA grinder and sausage stuffer. I've primarily done small batches though.

Next purchase will probably be a pressure cooker.

And to chime in on the duck confit conversation, places like Whole Foods sell duck fat in containers.  However if you have the option of just buying a whole next time, do that instead. Then you get the breasts and all the additional fat you can render on your own.
 
2014-05-29 11:28:15 PM  

Trillian Astra: A half-way decent chef's knife, chopping boards, and a meat thermometer. I've got a pretty bare bones kitchen.

But I'm getting a new cast iron pan after we move.


I highly recommend you search craigslist or eBay for an older Wagner or Griswold cast iron skillet. They are generally classified as antiques. Make sure you get one stamped with "Erie" (if it's a Griswold), that it sits flat and has a patina from good seasoning and even cooking over many years.  The Lodge brand is crap compared to the older American made Griswolds and Wagners.
 
2014-05-29 11:29:12 PM  
Rubber baking spatula FOR ALL THE THINGS!!! It can scrape all of the egg off of the bottom of your egg skillet when you're making scrambled eggs. It'll scrape everything off of the bottom of your wok when you're making stir fry. It'll even scrape the sides of your bowl when you're *DING!* BAKING!

That's all I have really.
 
2014-05-29 11:39:05 PM  

sdd2000: For when my GF cooks:

[img.fark.net image 850x796]


She sounds hot.

bu dum ching.

but seriously...
 
2014-05-29 11:41:30 PM  

lumiere: Trillian Astra: A half-way decent chef's knife, chopping boards, and a meat thermometer. I've got a pretty bare bones kitchen.

But I'm getting a new cast iron pan after we move.

I highly recommend you search craigslist or eBay for an older Wagner or Griswold cast iron skillet. They are generally classified as antiques. Make sure you get one stamped with "Erie" (if it's a Griswold), that it sits flat and has a patina from good seasoning and even cooking over many years.  The Lodge brand is crap compared to the older American made Griswolds and Wagners.


Does that still hold true if they have been blasted back down to white because they were rusty when the picker found found them?
 
2014-05-29 11:42:37 PM  

KeelingLovesCornholes: My Kitchen Aid stand mixer, biatches.


you gotta have a kitchen tractor
 
2014-05-30 12:16:04 AM  
Love my Stormtrooper spatula, the OXO Good Grips scrubbing brush with the base that catches drips is used throughout the day too.
c2.staticflickr.com
 
2014-05-30 12:17:16 AM  

thisisarepeat: lumiere: Trillian Astra: A half-way decent chef's knife, chopping boards, and a meat thermometer. I've got a pretty bare bones kitchen.

But I'm getting a new cast iron pan after we move.

I highly recommend you search craigslist or eBay for an older Wagner or Griswold cast iron skillet. They are generally classified as antiques. Make sure you get one stamped with "Erie" (if it's a Griswold), that it sits flat and has a patina from good seasoning and even cooking over many years.  The Lodge brand is crap compared to the older American made Griswolds and Wagners.

Does that still hold true if they have been blasted back down to white because they were rusty when the picker found found them?


Yes, just re-season them.  It'll take a bit of work, but worth it.
 
2014-05-30 12:17:41 AM  
Here's my list. I'll try not to repeat what every one else has mentioned previously, unless they are truly essential in my kitchen.

- Vitamix Blender (worth every dollar and it was purchased with a ten year warranty)
- SEB Pressure Cooker (old French model circa 1980s, gift from my mom)
- Le Creuset set of enameled cast iron pots and pans (I think I have over 7 in various sizes and colors, including a Le Creuset tagine (for North African food and most Eastern European/ Russian and uzbek stews)
- Steamer for couscous
- Wine opener (it was a gift)

Things I regret buying:
- Sous Vide (expensive and not used as much as I'd like)

The next thing I plan on buying:
- KitchenAid Stand Mixer
- LEM Sausage stuffer so I can make homemade Algerian merguez...

cdn.theatlantic.com
 
2014-05-30 12:20:19 AM  

rohar: thisisarepeat: lumiere: Trillian Astra: A half-way decent chef's knife, chopping boards, and a meat thermometer. I've got a pretty bare bones kitchen.

But I'm getting a new cast iron pan after we move.

I highly recommend you search craigslist or eBay for an older Wagner or Griswold cast iron skillet. They are generally classified as antiques. Make sure you get one stamped with "Erie" (if it's a Griswold), that it sits flat and has a patina from good seasoning and even cooking over many years.  The Lodge brand is crap compared to the older American made Griswolds and Wagners.

Does that still hold true if they have been blasted back down to white because they were rusty when the picker found found them?

Yes, just re-season them.  It'll take a bit of work, but worth it.


Yep, I second what rohar said. Unless the cast iron skillet is warped, has a hairline crack or has crusts of burned food on the interior, it can be used for decades on end. Make sure you are seasoning it correctly and you'll be fine.
 
2014-05-30 12:31:04 AM  

lumiere: Here's my list. I'll try not to repeat what every one else has mentioned previously, unless they are truly essential in my kitchen.

- Vitamix Blender (worth every dollar and it was purchased with a ten year warranty)
- SEB Pressure Cooker (old French model circa 1980s, gift from my mom)
- Le Creuset set of enameled cast iron pots and pans (I think I have over 7 in various sizes and colors, including a Le Creuset tagine (for North African food and most Eastern European/ Russian and uzbek stews)
- Steamer for couscous
- Wine opener (it was a gift)

Things I regret buying:
- Sous Vide (expensive and not used as much as I'd like)

The next thing I plan on buying:
- KitchenAid Stand Mixer
- LEM Sausage stuffer so I can make homemade Algerian merguez...

[cdn.theatlantic.com image 450x300]


I know, I'm gonna piss off a bunch of foodies, but skip the LEM.  I own one and refuse to use it anymore.  This is gonna sound odd as all hell, but go to Harbor Freight.  http://www.harborfreight.com/http-www-harborfreight-com-electric-meat - grinder-99598-html.html

Tough as nails, works well if you can spin the links fast enough, and if (I haven't in over 300lbs of meat) you burn it out, it's only $50.
 
2014-05-30 12:59:07 AM  

rohar: thisisarepeat: lumiere: Trillian Astra: A half-way decent chef's knife, chopping boards, and a meat thermometer. I've got a pretty bare bones kitchen.

But I'm getting a new cast iron pan after we move.

I highly recommend you search craigslist or eBay for an older Wagner or Griswold cast iron skillet. They are generally classified as antiques. Make sure you get one stamped with "Erie" (if it's a Griswold), that it sits flat and has a patina from good seasoning and even cooking over many years.  The Lodge brand is crap compared to the older American made Griswolds and Wagners.

Does that still hold true if they have been blasted back down to white because they were rusty when the picker found found them?

Yes, just re-season them.  It'll take a bit of work, but worth it.


cool, thanks.
 
2014-05-30 01:23:50 AM  

acohn: [img.fark.net image 425x363]

/Can't believe I'm the first with this.


Oh hell yes.

In my set of kitchen supplies, I also have a bunch of non-stick cooking spoons. I use them for stirring the French Press, and then later scooping out the spent grounds. They do the job perfectly, and I don't have to worry about scratching the glass. As functional spoons, they don't work so well.
 
2014-05-30 01:52:35 AM  
Rotisserie convection toaster oven. Makes awesome Easter duck.
Immersion blender. Second best red gravy of my life.
Mesh colander. Takes the fat out of ground anything.
Flex chop mats. Why not more pop?
Rum. Makes everything better and yummier. Red wine works good in the food; though.
And another word: bolline. I bought it for me; he uses it for himself. Toodles!
 
2014-05-30 01:59:37 AM  
Cant believe this wasn't mentioned...


img0.etsystatic.com


Friggin thing is awesome - a workhorse i have been using for 25+ years


/hot like a brat
 
2014-05-30 02:07:09 AM  
Cutting boards. (I eat a lot of chopped vegetable salads.) Small strainers to catch the seeds when I squeeze lemon juice over said salads.

Flexible scraper, for making scrambled eggs and for scraping (duh) bowls when I bake.

Funnels. Seriously. I picked up a set of two funnels, one small and one large, at IKEA a while back for about $1. I use them all the time to fill water bottles, sugar jars, etc. The other day I was going to make chicken cutlets and realized I didn't have flour. Put the oil back in the bottle using a funnel - easy as pie. I highly recommend having a couple on hand.

Maybe not really a kitchen utensil, but those bag clips get a good workout in my kitchen, even though I keep most stuff in mason or canning jars.

Are grinder for rock salt and pepper considered kitchen utensils? They get heavy use, as well.
 
2014-05-30 02:12:58 AM  
Oh, I forgot - my egg slicer.
 
2014-05-30 02:36:30 AM  

rohar: lumiere: Here's my list. I'll try not to repeat what every one else has mentioned previously, unless they are truly essential in my kitchen.

- Vitamix Blender (worth every dollar and it was purchased with a ten year warranty)
- SEB Pressure Cooker (old French model circa 1980s, gift from my mom)
- Le Creuset set of enameled cast iron pots and pans (I think I have over 7 in various sizes and colors, including a Le Creuset tagine (for North African food and most Eastern European/ Russian and uzbek stews)
- Steamer for couscous
- Wine opener (it was a gift)

Things I regret buying:
- Sous Vide (expensive and not used as much as I'd like)

The next thing I plan on buying:
- KitchenAid Stand Mixer
- LEM Sausage stuffer so I can make homemade Algerian merguez...

[cdn.theatlantic.com image 450x300]

I know, I'm gonna piss off a bunch of foodies, but skip the LEM.  I own one and refuse to use it anymore.  This is gonna sound odd as all hell, but go to Harbor Freight.  http://www.harborfreight.com/http-www-harborfreight-com-electric-meat - grinder-99598-html.html

Tough as nails, works well if you can spin the links fast enough, and if (I haven't in over 300lbs of meat) you burn it out, it's only $50.


Thank you, rohar! Piss off all the foodies you have to, sometimes kitchen gadgets don't have to be super expensive to be practical.

I'm not a huge fan of Harbor Freight because a lot if their stuff is crap but I do have one close by so I'll look into the meat grinder. Just one quick question, would I need to buy anything else to "stuff my own sausage/merguez"?
 
2014-05-30 02:53:50 AM  
Spice grinder. Holy shiat there's nothing better than fresh ground pepper.

I have two of them, one is a big heavy glass & bullet-proof plastic hourglass-shaped one, which is built to take LOTS of abuse...and then there's this dainty little butt-kicker that fits my small paws perfectly.

I found it in a local gourmet shop, used up the contents, and saved the grinder-top bottle.

www.italiangourmetonline.com

/hawt hawt hawt linked
 
2014-05-30 03:05:21 AM  
Those grinders have ceramic elements inside, I might add.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-05-30 06:36:16 AM  

amyldoanitrite: DGS: flucto: big-ass enameled cast iron pots with lids

We recently got an enameled cast-iron dutch oven. 5 qt I think. It's fantastic.. finally wifey can make plov. And I did duck legs for the first time. Being able to cook and then transition a pot straight to the oven is sweet.

Ok, I know I'm really late to the thread, but can you please post your plov recipe? We had an exchange student from Turkmenistan a few years ago, and I could never find a plov recipe that turned out right.

He said my somsas and manti were delicious, though.


I'll get it from her and either post it or send it to you. I thought it would have more spicing to it but it's pretty minimal. Then again, wifey can't handle spicy anything and tends to go minimal, so you'll probably end up changing it up a little as is suitable for your tastes. Generally speaking, though, it's 1-2 lbs of lamb shoulder with the bone in (the marrow is kind of important for flavor), a lb of carrots shredded, 2 large onions roughly diced, oil, rice, salt and pepper. It's the oil and rice I can't quantify at the moment.

i.imgur.com
 
2014-05-30 06:40:36 AM  

lumiere: - LEM Sausage stuffer so I can make homemade Algerian merguez...


When you get that and want help with sources and techniques I will probably be sleeping but I'll try.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-05-30 07:12:59 AM  

DGS: amyldoanitrite: DGS: flucto: big-ass enameled cast iron pots with lids

We recently got an enameled cast-iron dutch oven. 5 qt I think. It's fantastic.. finally wifey can make plov. And I did duck legs for the first time. Being able to cook and then transition a pot straight to the oven is sweet.

Ok, I know I'm really late to the thread, but can you please post your plov recipe? We had an exchange student from Turkmenistan a few years ago, and I could never find a plov recipe that turned out right.

He said my somsas and manti were delicious, though.

I'll get it from her and either post it or send it to you. I thought it would have more spicing to it but it's pretty minimal. Then again, wifey can't handle spicy anything and tends to go minimal, so you'll probably end up changing it up a little as is suitable for your tastes. Generally speaking, though, it's 1-2 lbs of lamb shoulder with the bone in (the marrow is kind of important for flavor), a lb of carrots shredded, 2 large onions roughly diced, oil, rice, salt and pepper. It's the oil and rice I can't quantify at the moment.

[i.imgur.com image 450x600]


Oh, and how did I forget this: a whole bulb of garlic.

So, basically, oil in the pan/pot, meat goes in to cook it so it browns a little bit, then add in your carrots and onion. Salt and pepper it, then stir to mix well. Once the onion starts to soften throw in the garlic and the rice, cover with a heavy lid so the rice can steam up while everything cooks in together.

This was me mostly watching.Later today I'll try to get the actual quantities.
 
2014-05-30 08:06:51 AM  
Aside from knives an cooking vessels?
Stainless steel mixing bowls and whisks.
Colander.
Gas flame.
Maple cutting boards.
And something from spatula city..
 
kth
2014-05-30 08:36:24 AM  

lumiere: Trillian Astra: A half-way decent chef's knife, chopping boards, and a meat thermometer. I've got a pretty bare bones kitchen.

But I'm getting a new cast iron pan after we move.

I highly recommend you search craigslist or eBay for an older Wagner or Griswold cast iron skillet. They are generally classified as antiques. Make sure you get one stamped with "Erie" (if it's a Griswold), that it sits flat and has a patina from good seasoning and even cooking over many years.  The Lodge brand is crap compared to the older American made Griswolds and Wagners.


Our local junk shop has two griswold mini casseroles. For $75. Each. That seems excessive.  I'm all for good stuff, but I thought it was an error when I first coveted them.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-05-30 08:44:56 AM  

lumiere: Here's my list. I'll try not to repeat what every one else has mentioned previously, unless they are truly essential in my kitchen.

- Le Creuset set of enameled cast iron pots and pans (I think I have over 7 in various sizes and colors, including a Le Creuset tagine (for North African food and most Eastern European/ Russian and uzbek stews)
- Steamer for couscous


We have an Oster steamer and it's worked great for us. Set the rice and ignore it while doing the rest of the work. Smooth and simple.

I'd love le creuset. Just costly as hell. We ended up picking up a Cuisinart 5qt enameled dutch oven and it has proven to be great so far. I can't really compare due to lack of experience with both but I can't much complain about what we have. Huge success for us (including the aforementioned plov, fitting right into your eastern European comment).
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-05-30 08:53:26 AM  

AllUpInYa: nickel-coated cast iron skillet (bullet-proof cast iron cooking without the headaches)


My eyebrows shot up at this one. Wifey has a strong nickel allergy (can't wear a lot of silver because of it, etc), so I can't help but think of just how bad this could be for us if any of that leeches out like normal cast-iron. I hope it's sealed, I've never heard of nickel-coated cast iron prior to this.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-05-30 08:58:06 AM  

sleeps in trees: flucto: DGS: We recently got an enameled cast-iron dutch oven. 5 qt I think. It's fantastic.. finally wifey can make plov. And I did duck legs for the first time. Being able to cook and then transition a pot straight to the oven is sweet.

Yeah, totally. I roast meat in them, make Bolognese, fry chickens, etc etc. indispensable IMO.

Off topic, my husband bought duck legs and I've never made them before.  Any tips?


Did you see my mail?
 
2014-05-30 09:10:29 AM  

lumiere: rohar: lumiere: Here's my list. I'll try not to repeat what every one else has mentioned previously, unless they are truly essential in my kitchen.

- Vitamix Blender (worth every dollar and it was purchased with a ten year warranty)
- SEB Pressure Cooker (old French model circa 1980s, gift from my mom)
- Le Creuset set of enameled cast iron pots and pans (I think I have over 7 in various sizes and colors, including a Le Creuset tagine (for North African food and most Eastern European/ Russian and uzbek stews)
- Steamer for couscous
- Wine opener (it was a gift)

Things I regret buying:
- Sous Vide (expensive and not used as much as I'd like)

The next thing I plan on buying:
- KitchenAid Stand Mixer
- LEM Sausage stuffer so I can make homemade Algerian merguez...

[cdn.theatlantic.com image 450x300]

I know, I'm gonna piss off a bunch of foodies, but skip the LEM.  I own one and refuse to use it anymore.  This is gonna sound odd as all hell, but go to Harbor Freight.  http://www.harborfreight.com/http-www-harborfreight-com-electric-meat - grinder-99598-html.html

Tough as nails, works well if you can spin the links fast enough, and if (I haven't in over 300lbs of meat) you burn it out, it's only $50.

Thank you, rohar! Piss off all the foodies you have to, sometimes kitchen gadgets don't have to be super expensive to be practical.

I'm not a huge fan of Harbor Freight because a lot if their stuff is crap but I do have one close by so I'll look into the meat grinder. Just one quick question, would I need to buy anything else to "stuff my own sausage/merguez"?


Casings.  That's it.  Works better if the meat is a bit on the cold side.  That's pretty normal for most meat grinders  Not frozen, but close seems perfect.

I'm not a huge fan of Harbor Freight either, but they've got a couple of products right.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-05-30 09:12:47 AM  

rohar: I'm not a huge fan of Harbor Freight either, but they've got a couple of products right.


Other than the meat grinder, what are some of the other products you feel are done well? Or did I miss that?
 
2014-05-30 09:19:03 AM  

DGS: rohar: I'm not a huge fan of Harbor Freight either, but they've got a couple of products right.

Other than the meat grinder, what are some of the other products you feel are done well? Or did I miss that?


They're not food related so I left them out :)

Wait, maybe HVLP paint sprayers could be used in the kitchen...
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-05-30 09:22:18 AM  

rohar: DGS: rohar: I'm not a huge fan of Harbor Freight either, but they've got a couple of products right.

Other than the meat grinder, what are some of the other products you feel are done well? Or did I miss that?

They're not food related so I left them out :)

Wait, maybe HVLP paint sprayers could be used in the kitchen...


Oh, gotcha.

/and maybe to spray moisture onto ribs in the smoker?
 
2014-05-30 09:34:16 AM  

SFSailor: catmandu: The meat grinder is wonderful, though!

I thought so, too... then I got an *actual* meat grinder and will *never* go back.  The KA attachments are now in the basement, pending a trip to Goodwill or similar.

If you grind meats regularly, get a real grinder.  A real one doesn't heat up and break the fat with extended use (the one I have actually gets *colder* the longer you use it), and is way faster / lower effort (and not awkwardly up in the air, if you're on the shorter side and the KA is on the counter).  Fundamentally, the lack of a cooling fan on the KA is, to my mind, a fatal design flaw.


Good point. I don't grind my own meats very often, just for a couple of recipes and when I make cannibal sandwiches. The attachment was a freebie when I bought my mixer (I got a special 75th anniversary one back in the 90's which was a special price, 2 free attachments, and a second bowl with my name engraved on it). That second bowl is the best "extra" you can get with a mixer. I have several cake recipes that require the egg whites be beaten separately and it is great to just pop one bowl on, beat, set aside and mix the rest of the batter in the other bowl. Also, when doing lots of baking, like at the holidays, I can mix dough for one batch and let it chill while still having a second bowl for another batch. Saves time when you don't have to transfer to something else, then wash the bowl.

I have dibs on my Mom's hand cranked meat grinder when she passes away. It has served her well for the last 65+ years (since her marriage to Dad) and I expect it to serve me well too.
 
2014-05-30 09:35:52 AM  
fbspc.com

Took years for me to get one of these, couldn't live without it now.  No pre-heating and doesn't heat up the house in warmer weather.
 
2014-05-30 09:41:05 AM  

DGS: amyldoanitrite: DGS: flucto: big-ass enameled cast iron pots with lids

We recently got an enameled cast-iron dutch oven. 5 qt I think. It's fantastic.. finally wifey can make plov. And I did duck legs for the first time. Being able to cook and then transition a pot straight to the oven is sweet.

Ok, I know I'm really late to the thread, but can you please post your plov recipe? We had an exchange student from Turkmenistan a few years ago, and I could never find a plov recipe that turned out right.

He said my somsas and manti were delicious, though.

I'll get it from her and either post it or send it to you. I thought it would have more spicing to it but it's pretty minimal. Then again, wifey can't handle spicy anything and tends to go minimal, so you'll probably end up changing it up a little as is suitable for your tastes. Generally speaking, though, it's 1-2 lbs of lamb shoulder with the bone in (the marrow is kind of important for flavor), a lb of carrots shredded, 2 large onions roughly diced, oil, rice, salt and pepper. It's the oil and rice I can't quantify at the moment.

[i.imgur.com image 450x600]


I went through a Russian phase and plov is one of my favorite dishes to make. My suggestions: add bay leaves, turmeric, coriander, cumin and paprika. Also, the carrots should be julienned. Natasha's kitchen has a good recipe for plov here.  Other Russian dishes I make regularly include Salad Olivieh (Russian potato salad on crack), and Chebureki (deep fried dumplings stuffed with beef or lamb). Feel free to email me if you want any of the recipes le ila ime @ gmail.com.

flucto: lumiere: - LEM Sausage stuffer so I can make homemade Algerian merguez...

When you get that and want help with sources and techniques I will probably be sleeping but I'll try.


Thanks! I'll take you up on that as soon as I head to Harbor Freight and pick one up. But it won't be anytime soon.

kth: lumiere: Trillian Astra: A half-way decent chef's knife, chopping boards, and a meat thermometer. I've got a pretty bare bones kitchen.

But I'm getting a new cast iron pan after we move.

I highly recommend you search craigslist or eBay for an older Wagner or Griswold cast iron skillet. They are generally classified as antiques. Make sure you get one stamped with "Erie" (if it's a Griswold), that it sits flat and has a patina from good seasoning and even cooking over many years.  The Lodge brand is crap compared to the older American made Griswolds and Wagners.

Our local junk shop has two griswold mini casseroles. For $75. Each. That seems excessive.  I'm all for good stuff, but I thought it was an error when I first coveted them.


75 bucks for a mini Griswold seems steep. You can find better deals if you aren't in a rush. I placed a bid on one on eBay (#9 Griswold Erie for $49). I got outbid but I'm not in a rush, they pop up all the time. Just don't settle.

DGS: lumiere: Here's my list. I'll try not to repeat what every one else has mentioned previously, unless they are truly essential in my kitchen.

- Le Creuset set of enameled cast iron pots and pans (I think I have over 7 in various sizes and colors, including a Le Creuset tagine (for North African food and most Eastern European/ Russian and uzbek stews)
- Steamer for couscous


We have an Oster steamer and it's worked great for us. Set the rice and ignore it while doing the rest of the work. Smooth and simple.

I'd love le creuset. Just costly as hell. We ended up picking up a Cuisinart 5qt enameled dutch oven and it has proven to be great so far. I can't really compare due to lack of experience with both but I can't much complain about what we have. Huge success for us (including the aforementioned plov, fitting right into your eastern European comment).


Le Creuset is super pricy but in all fairness, they last a lifetime and it's well worth the investment. I purchased several as a set from Sur La Table and if anything goes wrong with them, the company replaces them - no questions asked. I drunkenly dropped one and the handle cracked, within two weeks they sent me a replacement.

I should specify, the 'steamers' I have are pictured below. They are more like a basket. You put the couscous in it over a pot of boiling water. Perhaps steamer isn't the correct word but I wasn't sure how to translate 'couscousiere':

i.imgur.com
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-05-30 09:47:00 AM  

lumiere: I went through a Russian phase and plov is one of my favorite dishes to make. My suggestions: add bay leaves, turmeric, coriander, cumin and paprika. Also, the carrots should be julienned. Natasha's kitchen has a good recipe for plov here. Other Russian dishes I make regularly include Salad Olivieh (Russian potato salad on crack), and Chebureki (deep fried dumplings stuffed with beef or lamb). Feel free to email me if you want any of the recipes le ila ime @ gmail.com.


Thanks for the offer, I'm all for recipes. Being married to a Russian, though, I know better than to try and change her recipes without a good discussion. This is her childhood, heh. And Babushka is very particular about how her recipes get used. She asks about them anytime she hears we made something. :D I do know I'd like to punch up the plov some but.. well.. wish me luck on that. It still tastes quite good so I can't complain.

Olivie is a staple and there's not a New Years (let alone most other family gatherings) where this doesn't have a prominent spot on the table. I've come to enjoy vinaigrette as a very light, refreshing salad without all the mayo or sour cream. We've got the tools to make our own pelmeni and vareniki but wifey's been a bit lax on that. She swears she'll do it but.. heh.. we'll see.
 
2014-05-30 09:51:49 AM  
essential tools:

www.ikea.com


cast iron skillet
wok
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-05-30 09:59:55 AM  

lumiere: DGS: amyldoanitrite: DGS: flucto: big-ass enameled cast iron pots with lids

We recently got an enameled cast-iron dutch oven. 5 qt I think. It's fantastic.. finally wifey can make plov. And I did duck legs for the first time. Being able to cook and then transition a pot straight to the oven is sweet.

Ok, I know I'm really late to the thread, but can you please post your plov recipe? We had an exchange student from Turkmenistan a few years ago, and I could never find a plov recipe that turned out right.

He said my somsas and manti were delicious, though.

I'll get it from her and either post it or send it to you. I thought it would have more spicing to it but it's pretty minimal. Then again, wifey can't handle spicy anything and tends to go minimal, so you'll probably end up changing it up a little as is suitable for your tastes. Generally speaking, though, it's 1-2 lbs of lamb shoulder with the bone in (the marrow is kind of important for flavor), a lb of carrots shredded, 2 large onions roughly diced, oil, rice, salt and pepper. It's the oil and rice I can't quantify at the moment.

[i.imgur.com image 450x600]


I went through a Russian phase and plov is one of my favorite dishes to make. My suggestions: add bay leaves, turmeric, coriander, cumin and paprika. Also, the carrots should be julienned. Natasha's kitchen has a good recipe for plov here.


Also - I went and read that recipe. Good stuff, and reminds me that yes, she'd boiled water in a kettle and added it after adding the rice. I really should've written all this down, but this seems like a good recipe if you want to go with beef. I still think missing out on the flavor from the bone is taking away from it even with the other spices added that I didn't mention.
 
2014-05-30 10:00:21 AM  

lumiere: DGS: amyldoanitrite: DGS: flucto:
*snip*

I should specify, the 'steamers' I have are pictured below. They are more like a basket. You put the couscous in it over a pot of boiling water. Perhaps steamer isn't the correct word but I wasn't sure how to translate 'couscousiere':


Want! Those look like the perfect baskets to raise my bread in!
 
2014-05-30 10:02:04 AM  

DGS: lumiere: I went through a Russian phase and plov is one of my favorite dishes to make. My suggestions: add bay leaves, turmeric, coriander, cumin and paprika. Also, the carrots should be julienned. Natasha's kitchen has a good recipe for plov here. Other Russian dishes I make regularly include Salad Olivieh (Russian potato salad on crack), and Chebureki (deep fried dumplings stuffed with beef or lamb). Feel free to email me if you want any of the recipes le ila ime @ gmail.com.

Thanks for the offer, I'm all for recipes. Being married to a Russian, though, I know better than to try and change her recipes without a good discussion. This is her childhood, heh. And Babushka is very particular about how her recipes get used. She asks about them anytime she hears we made something. :D I do know I'd like to punch up the plov some but.. well.. wish me luck on that. It still tastes quite good so I can't complain.

Olivie is a staple and there's not a New Years (let alone most other family gatherings) where this doesn't have a prominent spot on the table. I've come to enjoy vinaigrette as a very light, refreshing salad without all the mayo or sour cream. We've got the tools to make our own pelmeni and vareniki but wifey's been a bit lax on that. She swears she'll do it but.. heh.. we'll see.


Da, don't ever mess with the Ruskies when it comes to cooking and trying to alter their recipes. If you and your SO are ever in Austin, Texas, a friend of mine,  Varda Tamoulianis, owns the only Russian restaurant here, Russian House NaZdorovye. They cook a mean Pelmeni and their Manti is great too.  You can tell her the Algerian sent you. ;)

Priyatnogo appetita!
 
2014-05-30 10:19:32 AM  

DGS: rohar: DGS: rohar: I'm not a huge fan of Harbor Freight either, but they've got a couple of products right.

Other than the meat grinder, what are some of the other products you feel are done well? Or did I miss that?

They're not food related so I left them out :)

Wait, maybe HVLP paint sprayers could be used in the kitchen...

Oh, gotcha.

/and maybe to spray moisture onto ribs in the smoker?


I suppose one of these:

http://www.harborfreight.com/3-cfm-two-stage-vacuum-pump-60805.html

could be useful if you were looking to do a massive sous vide.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-05-30 10:24:19 AM  

lumiere: Da, don't ever mess with the Ruskies when it comes to cooking and trying to alter their recipes. If you and your SO are ever in Austin, Texas, a friend of mine, Varda Tamoulianis, owns the only Russian restaurant here, Russian House NaZdorovye. They cook a mean Pelmeni and their Manti is great too. You can tell her the Algerian sent you. ;)

Priyatnogo appetita!


Hah, На Здoровье :D Excellent. Thanks for the tip.. we actually live in a -very- heavily Russian neighborhood. But I'll certainly keep that in mind should we head that way.
 
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