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(ThinkGeek)   Fark Food Thread: Aside from knives and cooking vessels, what are some of your 'go to' kitchen utensils? What is notable about them that other Farkers should consider over similar utensils? Does the form matter as much as the function?   (thinkgeek.com ) divider line
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1566 clicks; posted to Main » on 29 May 2014 at 5:00 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



329 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-05-29 03:36:14 PM  
I'm not into kitchen gadgets, but I do like my Ninja if I have to fine chop a shiatload of veggies.
 
2014-05-29 03:36:34 PM  
Immersion blender.

If you make soups or sauces, they are amaaaaaaaaazing tools.
I like to use mine to make fancy scarmbly eggs as well.


Oh, and my rad sodastream. haha
 
2014-05-29 03:37:04 PM  
i.c-b.co$web_zoom$&/1308302306/microplane-grater-zester.jpg
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-05-29 03:39:32 PM  

Purelilac: I'm not into kitchen gadgets, but I do like my Ninja if I have to fine chop a shiatload of veggies.


LlamaGirl: Immersion blender.

If you make soups or sauces, they are amaaaaaaaaazing tools.
I like to use mine to make fancy scarmbly eggs as well.


Heh, I have a Ninja immersion blender that separated out so the motor can be attached to a standard blender. First thing I thought of. And you both beat me to it. Love this thing. So useful.

media.tumblr.com
 
2014-05-29 03:39:35 PM  

Purelilac: I'm not into kitchen gadgets, but I do like my Ninja if I have to fine chop a shiatload of veggies.


I have two marinades that I use my Ninja for and it makes mixing them so much easier.

Plus it's great for making rum smoothies.

That thing is a godsend.
 
2014-05-29 03:39:45 PM  
www.featherweightcreations.com
 
2014-05-29 03:40:25 PM  
No, it's not a knife.
 
2014-05-29 03:40:40 PM  
Gadgets I would not live without:

Vitamix
Kitchenaid mixer
meat grinder
stick blender
heavy duty masher
big-ass enameled cast iron pots with lids
pastry bags
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-05-29 03:40:57 PM  

CapeFearCadaver: No, it's not a knife.


Yeah, but you aren't cooking with it ei..................

*gurgle*
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-05-29 03:42:31 PM  

flucto: big-ass enameled cast iron pots with lids


We recently got an enameled cast-iron dutch oven. 5 qt I think. It's fantastic.. finally wifey can make plov. And I did duck legs for the first time. Being able to cook and then transition a pot straight to the oven is sweet.
 
2014-05-29 03:44:09 PM  
It slices meats, cheeses and vegetables, and is indispensable for dismembering bodies:

i392.photobucket.com
 
2014-05-29 03:44:43 PM  

DGS: We recently got an enameled cast-iron dutch oven. 5 qt I think. It's fantastic.. finally wifey can make plov. And I did duck legs for the first time. Being able to cook and then transition a pot straight to the oven is sweet.


Yeah, totally. I roast meat in them, make Bolognese, fry chickens, etc etc. indispensable IMO.
 
2014-05-29 03:45:05 PM  
I have been known to use forks from time to time, or spatulas.
 
2014-05-29 03:45:19 PM  

DGS: flucto: big-ass enameled cast iron pots with lids

We recently got an enameled cast-iron dutch oven. 5 qt I think. It's fantastic.. finally wifey can make plov. And I did duck legs for the first time. Being able to cook and then transition a pot straight to the oven is sweet.


Headline said not vessels, but I adore my cast iron and enameled cast iron cookware.
 
2014-05-29 03:45:50 PM  
Immersion blender
Vacuum sealer - great for bulk-buying
Keurig - I find it hard to believe that I survived as long as I did without one of these
Kitchen Aid Food Processor
Prepology silicon knives
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-05-29 03:46:44 PM  

Purelilac: DGS: flucto: big-ass enameled cast iron pots with lids

We recently got an enameled cast-iron dutch oven. 5 qt I think. It's fantastic.. finally wifey can make plov. And I did duck legs for the first time. Being able to cook and then transition a pot straight to the oven is sweet.

Headline said not vessels, but I adore my cast iron and enameled cast iron cookware.


True. Farkers tend to make their own rules, though. Heh.
 
2014-05-29 03:47:21 PM  

Purelilac: DGS: flucto: big-ass enameled cast iron pots with lids

We recently got an enameled cast-iron dutch oven. 5 qt I think. It's fantastic.. finally wifey can make plov. And I did duck legs for the first time. Being able to cook and then transition a pot straight to the oven is sweet.

Headline said not vessels, but I adore my cast iron and enameled cast iron cookware.


Submitter is not the boss of me.
 
2014-05-29 03:48:38 PM  

GalFriday: Vacuum sealer - great for bulk-buying


omg YES
 
2014-05-29 03:50:39 PM  
As far as I'm concerned, the only knife a cook needs is a Chinese cleaver. It cuts, it slices, it cleaves through bone and yet you can even use it to pare and shave. It is, by far, the most versatile cooking knife out there.

www.paulsfinest.com
 
2014-05-29 03:50:49 PM  

LlamaGirl: GalFriday: Vacuum sealer - great for bulk-buying

omg YES


Very useful indeed. A bit more of a pain than one might initially expect at times though.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-05-29 03:50:51 PM  

LlamaGirl: GalFriday: Vacuum sealer - great for bulk-buying

omg YES


I got one of these as a New Years present this past holiday, and it's been awesome. We get a few things in bulk and this does a great job of keeping them until ready to thaw 'em out and make the food up. It's noticeable.
 
2014-05-29 03:51:07 PM  
I do love my Keurig knockoff (Mr Coffee from Target).
 
2014-05-29 03:51:27 PM  
My simple garlic press is the main tool I couldn't do without.

I have this flat, round mesh strainer thing with a long handle that I use often.

My wood cutting board shaped like Michigan is awesome.
 
2014-05-29 03:53:18 PM  
ecx.images-amazon.com

This thing makes awesome coffee. Best practical method I've ever tried.
 
2014-05-29 03:53:31 PM  
Flexible cutting boards are awesome.
 
2014-05-29 03:53:59 PM  

Purelilac: I do love my Keurig knockoff (Mr Coffee from Target).


They are the greatest things!
 
2014-05-29 03:55:06 PM  
As stupid as it is, this is one of my favorite little gadgets.  especially for making things like hollandaise.  Love me some Eggs Benedict.

cdn.thisiswhatiwant.com
 
2014-05-29 03:55:33 PM  

generalDisdain: Flexible cutting boards are awesome.


This cannot be said enough.
 
2014-05-29 03:56:09 PM  

ytterbium: My wood cutting board shaped like Michigan is awesome


want
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-05-29 03:57:55 PM  

generalDisdain: Flexible cutting boards are awesome.


I really dislike them. Maybe I just have cheap ones and that's the problem, but they slide all over my countertops while I'm trying to work. I don't want to spend as much time managing my surface as I am my knife and the food I'm prepping. I opted for this, which has been solid for me.
 
2014-05-29 03:57:58 PM  
I love my garlic press.
 
2014-05-29 03:58:24 PM  
i.kinja-img.com

This changed by life.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-05-29 03:58:51 PM  

RexTalionis: As far as I'm concerned, the only knife a cook needs is a Chinese cleaver. It cuts, it slices, it cleaves through bone and yet you can even use it to pare and shave. It is, by far, the most versatile cooking knife out there.

[www.paulsfinest.com image 700x283]


I hesitate to get my hands on something like that. Though I've seen some amusing ones that look like elaborate hatchets. Heh.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-05-29 03:59:58 PM  

mrshowrules: [i.kinja-img.com image 636x358]

This changed by life.


How?


DonWrite: I love my garlic press.


I often find those annoying. :/
 
2014-05-29 04:00:01 PM  

DGS: generalDisdain: Flexible cutting boards are awesome.

I really dislike them. Maybe I just have cheap ones and that's the problem, but they slide all over my countertops while I'm trying to work. I don't want to spend as much time managing my surface as I am my knife and the food I'm prepping. I opted for this, which has been solid for me.


We solved the slipping issue by putting a piece of rubber matting under the cutting board. It does make the cutting surface slightly less solid, but avoiding the sliding issue is worth the trade-off.
 
2014-05-29 04:00:13 PM  
I love my Kitchen Aid mixer.
 
2014-05-29 04:01:08 PM  

RexTalionis: As far as I'm concerned, the only knife a cook needs is a Chinese cleaver. It cuts, it slices, it cleaves through bone and yet you can even use it to pare and shave. It is, by far, the most versatile cooking knife out there.

[www.paulsfinest.com image 700x283]


Yeaaaaaaah I'll stick with my 8' chefs knife for the majority of my kitchen duties. I would hurt myself on that there cleaver.
 
2014-05-29 04:01:29 PM  
Believe me, form matters in the kitchen:

1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-05-29 04:02:08 PM  

generalDisdain: DGS: generalDisdain: Flexible cutting boards are awesome.

I really dislike them. Maybe I just have cheap ones and that's the problem, but they slide all over my countertops while I'm trying to work. I don't want to spend as much time managing my surface as I am my knife and the food I'm prepping. I opted for this, which has been solid for me.

We solved the slipping issue by putting a piece of rubber matting under the cutting board. It does make the cutting surface slightly less solid, but avoiding the sliding issue is worth the trade-off.


Glue tiny little rubber feet to the corners. That's what I did.
 
2014-05-29 04:02:49 PM  
I've gone "Luddite" and only use sharp rocks & logs.
 
2014-05-29 04:03:12 PM  

DjangoStonereaver: Believe me, form matters in the kitchen:

[1.bp.blogspot.com image 575x780]


What is she doing squeezing an entire lemon that isn't halved, into a cast iron skillet? WHAT IS SHE DOING?!?!?!?!?

I am finding it difficult to believe she is actually cooking anything at all.
 
2014-05-29 04:03:18 PM  

DGS: mrshowrules: [i.kinja-img.com image 636x358]

This changed by life.

How?


DonWrite: I love my garlic press.

I often find those annoying. :/


Really? Saves so much time and hand washing! I use the Oxo one which feels good in my hand. I've tried others, but this one is good for me. I actually broke one. haha
 
2014-05-29 04:03:24 PM  

RexTalionis: As far as I'm concerned, the only knife a cook needs is a Chinese cleaver. It cuts, it slices, it cleaves through bone and yet you can even use it to pare and shave. It is, by far, the most versatile cooking knife out there.

[www.paulsfinest.com image 700x283]


Mine's prettier.
 
2014-05-29 04:03:30 PM  

DjangoStonereaver: 1.bp.blogspot.com


As has been pointed out to me the headline says "no vessels"
 
2014-05-29 04:05:04 PM  

LlamaGirl: generalDisdain: DGS: generalDisdain: Flexible cutting boards are awesome.

I really dislike them. Maybe I just have cheap ones and that's the problem, but they slide all over my countertops while I'm trying to work. I don't want to spend as much time managing my surface as I am my knife and the food I'm prepping. I opted for this, which has been solid for me.

We solved the slipping issue by putting a piece of rubber matting under the cutting board. It does make the cutting surface slightly less solid, but avoiding the sliding issue is worth the trade-off.

Glue tiny little rubber feet to the corners. That's what I did.


I have a silicon cutting board that slides all over, but put a damp papertowel under, and it stays put.
 
2014-05-29 04:08:53 PM  
thumbs3.ebaystatic.com

I've had this offset spatula identical to this one for years & use it more than any of my other spatulas.

thumbs3.ebaystatic.com

I inherited a spatula identical to this from my grandma. It's great for getting roasts out of the Crock Pot or a roast chicken out of the pan.
www.reluctantfarmwife.com

Every kitchen should have a Kitchamajig. Great multi-purpose kitchen tool
 
2014-05-29 04:09:54 PM  
I really need a small whisk
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-05-29 04:14:03 PM  

DonWrite: I really need a small whisk


cf2.foodista.com
 
2014-05-29 04:14:04 PM  
You can also put a kitchen towel under your cutting board to keep it solid.
 
2014-05-29 04:16:34 PM  
Other things I use at least every week:

whirley pop for roasting coffee
high temperature rubber spatulas
ceramic knife
lime juicing stick
tongs (suck it, Keller)
stick blender
salad spinner
spice grinder
vacuum sealer
rolling pins
cake pans
 
2014-05-29 04:17:56 PM  
kissthecookonline.com

Loves me my mortar and pestle.

Makes me feel like some kind of alchemist.
 
2014-05-29 04:20:49 PM  

miss diminutive: [kissthecookonline.com image 500x500]

Loves me my mortar and pestle.

Makes me feel like some kind of alchemist.


Loves mines too.  I use it even when it isn't entirely necessary.  I cackle when I use it the same way I cackle when I eat Bugles and put them on my fingertips --  all witchy and errythang.
 
2014-05-29 04:21:18 PM  

DonWrite: DGS: mrshowrules: [i.kinja-img.com image 636x358]

This changed by life.

How?


It save me tons of time cutting hot dogs into little semi-circles.
 
2014-05-29 04:21:33 PM  

DGS: DonWrite: I really need a small whisk

[cf2.foodista.com image 607x400]


>:(
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-05-29 04:23:50 PM  

mrshowrules: DonWrite: DGS: mrshowrules: [i.kinja-img.com image 636x358]

This changed by life.

How?

It save me tons of time cutting hot dogs into little semi-circles.


Now that's a... lofty goal?

/to be fair, I bet babby would love seeing that.


DonWrite: DGS: DonWrite: I really need a small whisk

[cf2.foodista.com image 607x400]

>:(


AND YOU'LL LIKE IT, MISTER
 
2014-05-29 05:03:34 PM  
Toaster oven. It might be the most versatile tool in my kitchen. Everything from, well, toasting, to baking chicken, to broiling vegetables.
 
2014-05-29 05:04:19 PM  
www.asseenontvsale.com
 
2014-05-29 05:04:33 PM  
www.4thegrill.com

Quicker than marinating

toolwizard.com

They make me feel like the Wolverine when I BBQ.
 
2014-05-29 05:06:01 PM  

miss diminutive: [kissthecookonline.com image 500x500]

Loves me my mortar and pestle.

Makes me feel like some kind of alchemist.



One of those has been on my list for a long time.  Really need to get one.
 
2014-05-29 05:07:02 PM  
i65.photobucket.com
 
2014-05-29 05:08:31 PM  
lh4.ggpht.com
If you've spent any amount of time in a restaurant and have knife skills I highly recommend Japanese steel over everything else. It holds its' blade better, it's so light, and when it does get dull is very easy to sharpen.
 
2014-05-29 05:09:14 PM  
www.globeequipment.com
thesweethome.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com
 
2014-05-29 05:09:28 PM  
I have a useful ulu, but that's a knife, I guess. A good tool I would pick after that is an old fashioned rotary slicer/shredder. It works on cheese, potatoes, vegetables, hardboiled eggs, etc. It's fun and easy and rarely maims me.
 
2014-05-29 05:09:50 PM  
media.tumblr.com
 
2014-05-29 05:10:17 PM  
Thermapen
Stand Mixer
Tilia Vac-U-Suck
Oxo Tongs
My All Clad Tri-Ply cookware. <--- More than anything else this makes a huge difference for consistency in the kitchen. Not enough can be said about have good pots and pans. You only have to buy em once.
Also my set of Cutco knives. (Yeah I know I'll catch hell for this, but I think they are good knives. They hold a good edge and are easy to sharpen with my accusharp.)
The microplane is awesome! We use it for hard cheeses all the time. So easy to use.
Also having a sturdy box grater is a must in my house. I behold the power of cheese on a daily basis so grating is important. Kitchenaid makes a box grater that I have yet to find and equal for.
 
2014-05-29 05:10:23 PM  

Purelilac: You can also put a kitchen towel under your cutting board to keep it solid.


A damp paper towel works great too...plus once you are done chopping, you can use it to clean up. :)
 
2014-05-29 05:11:05 PM  

keithgabryelski: [i.c-b.co image 165x1500]$web_zoom$&/1308302306/microplane-grater-zester.jpg


You are a farking idiot for that.

Good job keeping allergic people down.
 
2014-05-29 05:11:13 PM  
I have an irrational love of wooden spoons. I use them for pretty much anything that doesn't strongly require another type of stirring or scooping utensil. I'm not sure why cooking and baking is more enjoyable/good tastes better when I use a wooden spoon but it does!

Also my Kitchenaid mixer and microplane zester.
 
2014-05-29 05:12:26 PM  
Mini-processor for instant salsa from garden tomatoes and jalapeños.
Ancient Oster processor for hummus
Serrated vegetable knife- cannot exist without it
King Kutter for paper thin sliced veggies (love those home fry chips)
My mom's set of post-WW2 stainless Flint utensils- large and small strainers, cake server, spatula, etc. The tangs are 1/4" thick and the darn things look brand new
 
2014-05-29 05:12:32 PM  
I have two novelty cutting boards- one in the shape of Colorado and one in the shape of Hawaii.

/I use the Colorado cutting board a lot more than the Hawaii board.
//It takes too long to assmble the islands in the right order prior to using them.
///You'd think the Big Island would be the go-to island, but no.  Molokai.
 
2014-05-29 05:12:33 PM  
Yea, I'm listening to the breakdown for the track now.

farking liars and deceivers.
 
2014-05-29 05:13:04 PM  
I like my slap chop.
 
2014-05-29 05:13:17 PM  
Silpat which was great when I was baking a lot of bread; it made kneading so much easier to clean up after.

Stainless steel roaster. It was expensive, but makes roasting vegetables less expensive since I was warping cookie sheets at 450 degrees.

Presto electric pressure cooker. Also doubles as a slow cooker, and has a sauté setting. Versatile.

Food processor, duh.
 
2014-05-29 05:13:20 PM  
www.smashinggadgets.com
 
2014-05-29 05:14:12 PM  
My dishwasher. After (many) years of living without one, I finally moved into a place that has one about a year and half ago. It is so nice to speed up the clean-up!

And my kitchen also has a garbage disposal, which I find handy. First place I've ever lived to have one.

Don't really go in for gadgets. Occasionally I'll use the food processor. I use the whisk and tongs a lot, along with the flexible cutting boards that have been mentioned upthread.
 
2014-05-29 05:14:19 PM  

keithgabryelski: [i.c-b.co image 165x1500]$web_zoom$&/1308302306/microplane-grater-zester.jpg


Yep.
 
2014-05-29 05:14:46 PM  
Cast-iron skillets! Keep 'em seasoned, folks. I use them for nearly everything; I even got rid of my non-stick pans!
 
2014-05-29 05:15:35 PM  
If you're into baking, try a Silpat.
 
2014-05-29 05:16:48 PM  

DRTFA: I have two novelty cutting boards- one in the shape of Colorado and one in the shape of Hawaii.

/I use the Colorado cutting board a lot more than the Hawaii board.
//It takes too long to assmble the islands in the right order prior to using them.
///You'd think the Big Island would be the go-to island, but no.  Molokai.


Aren't most cutting boards in the shape of Colorado, or is that the joke?
 
2014-05-29 05:17:15 PM  

flucto: Gadgets I would not live without:

Vitamix
Kitchenaid mixer
meat grinder
stick blender
heavy duty masher
big-ass enameled cast iron pots with lids
pastry bags


These are all on my list as well.  Would like to add:

Mini ice cream scoop ( measures uniform muffins, cupcakes, cheese puffs ( i have two sizes), cookies, etc.
Osterizer blender
Pastry cutter

Not really a gadget, but parchment paper.
 
2014-05-29 05:17:21 PM  
I love my box grater, my $4 mandoline, and my mortar & pestle. I've never been much for electric gadgets.. if I cooked more, I'd probably appreciate them.
 
2014-05-29 05:17:22 PM  

L.D. Ablo: I love my Kitchen Aid mixer.


Absolutely, that thing does everything, it has a power takeoff on the front that you can rig to run a lot of otherwise manual tools like meat mixers for making sausage.  I call it my kitchen tractor.
 
2014-05-29 05:17:53 PM  
AirBake baking sheet. It prevents the smoke alarm from serving as the dinner bell.
Seriously, when we bake on a regular cookie sheet, the bottom is cooked way before the top is done, it gets overcooked, and sometimes puts off enough smoke (doesn't take much) to sound the alarm. With the AirBake sheet, it cooks evenly... and the cats don't freak out.
 
2014-05-29 05:19:17 PM  

peacheslatour: Osterizer blender


I know a Vitamix isn't cheap, but you'd never, ever Osterize again once you had one.
 
2014-05-29 05:19:26 PM  
My dad has OCD, and I got him the cutting board in the link as a gag gift.  I'm going to have to get him another one to actually use, he doesn't wasn't to ruin the markings on the one he has.
 
2014-05-29 05:19:49 PM  
Apple slicer. If you like apples, you want one of these:
img.fark.net
 
2014-05-29 05:20:15 PM  

thisisarepeat: Absolutely, that thing does everything, it has a power takeoff on the front that you can rig to run a lot of otherwise manual tools like meat mixers for making sausage. I call it my kitchen tractor.


The sausage stuffer for the Kitchen Aid is close to useless. I many of the other attachments but that one is way too much pain to bother.
 
2014-05-29 05:20:23 PM  
It would seem that I can't live without my toaster oven.  I use it for all sorts of things from actually cooking things in it on hot days when I don't want to heat up the whole kitchen to keeping plates and dishes warm.
 
2014-05-29 05:21:05 PM  
Pasta-strainer/colander kettle size.  I have gotten into boiling and par boiling vegetables and stuff (lord knows why,,.am I turning British?) and the pasta-strainer makes it superfly and easy.  I kiss its galvanized hole-riddled underside on lonely nights (not really).
 
2014-05-29 05:21:24 PM  
www.robohara.com
All my utensil needs are solved by Spatula City.
 
cot
2014-05-29 05:22:34 PM  

darkmayo: I like my slap chop.


Then you're in luck, as apparently Vince Offer is posting in this thread as  khyberkitsune.
 
2014-05-29 05:23:41 PM  
Slow Cooker / Crock-Pot easiest way to make most things! From Oatmeal in the morning to cobbler for after dinner.
 
2014-05-29 05:23:52 PM  

RexTalionis: As far as I'm concerned, the only knife a cook needs is a Chinese cleaver. It cuts, it slices, it cleaves through bone and yet you can even use it to pare and shave. It is, by far, the most versatile cooking knife out there.

[www.paulsfinest.com image 700x283]


A few years ago, I was at the local Asian grocery, and realized I needed something good for chopping vegetables. I picked up a Thai "Kiwi" brand cleaver for about $4.00. I figured I might get one or two uses out of it before the blade folded over, but I only needed it for a short time anyway.

Five years later, the thing is still going strong, and keeps a razor-sharp edge. It's my go-to blade for almost every slicing and chopping task in my kitchen. I love that thing, and plan to get more.

importfood.com
 
2014-05-29 05:23:59 PM  

Private_Citizen: Apple slicer. If you like apples, you want one of these:


We use ours for pears also and I even managed to wedge a pineapple too.
 
2014-05-29 05:24:00 PM  

LlamaGirl: Immersion blender.

If you make soups or sauces, they are amaaaaaaaaazing tools.
I like to use mine to make fancy scarmbly eggs as well.


Oh, and my rad sodastream. haha


I use mine to make a quick BBQ sauce after I cook short ribs.

Cook the ribs with a little apple cider vinegar, diced tomatoes, and a diced onion, plus assorted spices and herbage, pour all that in the saucepan after you're done cooking the ribs, let it reduce on medium heat for 20 minutes, then hit it with the stick blender to make it into sauce. I usually add some unflavored beef gelatin if the ribs were too lean to give the sauce some body.
 
2014-05-29 05:25:01 PM  

Purelilac: Headline said not vessels, but I adore my cast iron and enameled cast iron cookware.


I would shrivel up and die without my big cast-iron wok.
 
2014-05-29 05:25:27 PM  

flucto: peacheslatour: Osterizer blender

I know a Vitamix isn't cheap, but you'd never, ever Osterize again once you had one.


Fair point, but after living with a cheap drugstore blender for years, the Osterizer is like heaven.  My old plastic one would leak hot soup all over the place and couldn't crush ice for shiat.
 
2014-05-29 05:25:28 PM  

cgraves67: Private_Citizen: Apple slicer. If you like apples, you want one of these:

We use ours for pears also and I even managed to wedge a pineapple too.


Wow! How hard did you have to push to get it through a pineapple?
 
2014-05-29 05:25:31 PM  
The gadget I love is my moms Vitamix blender. That farker can chop up tree branches and you can make soup in it too. It spins so fast it makes its own heat to cook it.
 
2014-05-29 05:27:28 PM  

miss diminutive: [kissthecookonline.com image 500x500]

Loves me my mortar and pestle.

Makes me feel like some kind of alchemist.


I keep a second electric coffee grinder (never used for coffee) for grinding spices. Faster and easier than a mortar and pestle, but I suppose not as good for working out one's aggressions, or wet or sticky ingredients.
 
2014-05-29 05:27:39 PM  
Gotta have a Baby Bullet.
 
2014-05-29 05:27:49 PM  
Pressure cooker.

That is all.
 
2014-05-29 05:28:01 PM  
Aside from knives and cooking vessels...

lol
 
2014-05-29 05:28:26 PM  

sharpie_69: Pressure cooker.

That is all.


Terrorist.
 
2014-05-29 05:28:33 PM  
Deep fryer
 
2014-05-29 05:28:43 PM  

encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com


R.I.P Fark

 
2014-05-29 05:28:50 PM  

miss diminutive: Loves me my mortar and pestle.Makes me feel like some kind of alchemist.


I've always wanted one, just haven't ever gotten around to getting one.
 
2014-05-29 05:29:12 PM  
Not utensils or gadgets, but something no kitchen should be without - parchment paper and cheesecloth. Both of those are just so useful in all sorts of ways all over the house.

I have been wanting an actual iron rosette iron with different shapes, but can only find aluminum. My grandmother had one with all kinds of shapes and last I saw it was in the house in Posebyen, but last time I was there I couldn't find it. I think one of my cousins snagged it, so the quest continues.
 
2014-05-29 05:30:58 PM  

Nestchick: My dishwasher. After (many) years of living without one, I finally moved into a place that has one about a year and half ago. It is so nice to speed up the clean-up!

And my kitchen also has a garbage disposal, which I find handy. First place I've ever lived to have one.

Don't really go in for gadgets. Occasionally I'll use the food processor. I use the whisk and tongs a lot, along with the flexible cutting boards that have been mentioned upthread.


If i'm renting a place that doesn't have a garbage disposal I install a cheap builder grade "badger" if it is on city sewer I leave it when I move, if its on septic i take it with me so the landlord doesn't know it was me that caused him to spend 5K having that farker dug up.
 
2014-05-29 05:32:03 PM  
A blender that can eat a rake:
img.fark.net

/Just kidding. If you need a blender that strong, you need to find better ingredients.
 
2014-05-29 05:32:10 PM  
Mandoline
Slap-Chop type thing from Pampered Chef
Cast iron pans
Fridge
 
2014-05-29 05:33:01 PM  
www.shinyshiny.tv
 
2014-05-29 05:35:05 PM  
This is a stealth sponsored link by Spatula City right?
 
2014-05-29 05:35:57 PM  

flucto: thisisarepeat: Absolutely, that thing does everything, it has a power takeoff on the front that you can rig to run a lot of otherwise manual tools like meat mixers for making sausage. I call it my kitchen tractor.

The sausage stuffer for the Kitchen Aid is close to useless. I many of the other attachments but that one is way too much pain to bother.


Yes you need a separate stuffer, I use the vertical press, it works great.  I use a seperate grinder as well because I make 50lb batches.
 
2014-05-29 05:36:10 PM  
 
vpc
2014-05-29 05:36:36 PM  
A pair of chopsticks.

Test if your potatoes are done, grab that finicky piece of broccoli that fell out of the pan, stir your noodles, mix the oil in your natural peanut butter, grip-extender to reach the aluminum foil on the top shelf...
 
2014-05-29 05:36:37 PM  
Ricer.
Real way to make mashed taters.


img1.southernliving.timeinc.net
 
2014-05-29 05:36:53 PM  
Bass-O-Matic
 
2014-05-29 05:37:02 PM  
My OEB-12.20 Convotherm oven at work.  It is a $42k combination convection/steamer. It has a roll out racks and self-cleaning features.
 
2014-05-29 05:37:06 PM  

DGS: generalDisdain: Flexible cutting boards are awesome.

I really dislike them. Maybe I just have cheap ones and that's the problem, but they slide all over my countertops while I'm trying to work. I don't want to spend as much time managing my surface as I am my knife and the food I'm prepping. I opted for this, which has been solid for me.


Put a damp towel or rag under the cutting board to keep it from sliding.
 
2014-05-29 05:39:06 PM  

cgraves67: Private_Citizen: Apple slicer. If you like apples, you want one of these:

We use ours for pears also and I even managed to wedge a pineapple too.


the peeler/slicer/corer thing is great if you like to buy lots of apples and premake pie fillings, etc.
 
2014-05-29 05:39:29 PM  
Toaster oven - My wife cooks more in that than in the regular oven
Ice cream scoop - Perfect for portioning out pancakes, cupcakes, and other such things
Ice pick - because sometimes the best way to solve a problem is just to stab it
Instant hot-water spout on my sink - we go through literally gallons of tea in a month, and who wants to wait for water to boil?  Also handy for instant oatmeal, heating baby bottles, and many other uses
 
2014-05-29 05:39:42 PM  
Um, the items I cannot live without:
Vitamix
Vacuum tumbler
Souis vide unit
Pressure smoker
Ceramic kamaodo.
 
2014-05-29 05:39:54 PM  
Carbon steel knives
Sharpening steel
16" cast iron wok
Box grater
Mandolin
Mortar and pestle
Kitchamajig and some other stuff I'll think of when I go to use 'em
 
2014-05-29 05:40:04 PM  

Real Women Drink Akvavit: Not utensils or gadgets, but something no kitchen should be without - parchment paper and cheesecloth. Both of those are just so useful in all sorts of ways all over the house.

I have been wanting an actual iron rosette iron with different shapes, but can only find aluminum. My grandmother had one with all kinds of shapes and last I saw it was in the house in Posebyen, but last time I was there I couldn't find it. I think one of my cousins snagged it, so the quest continues.


I would love to have one of these.  I've seen them in catalogs- and yes they're aluminum.  My grandmother had a waffle iron that made flower and other shapes, I'm sure it went with some cousin as well. :(
I want to try to make chocolate waffles for waffle and ice cream sandwiches.
 
2014-05-29 05:40:29 PM  
www.plastwarehouse.com
 
2014-05-29 05:42:50 PM  
Love my enameled cast iron dutch oven, but rarely use it (the wife doesn't like trying to clean it).
Wooden spoons for whatever.
Box grater for Cole slaw and mass shred cheese consumption.
Tongs for damn near everything.

And its been said, but bears repeating: wash your hands, dry em with a paper towel and throw it under your cutting board to prevent slipping while you chop.
 
2014-05-29 05:42:53 PM  
Electric kettle - I use it far more than I ever imagined.

Tongs - the spring-loaded V-shaped ones that you see in restaurant kitchens, not the stupid X-shaped ones.

Pizza stone & peel - for all bread-making activities.

Teeny funnel - for filling my flask.

Plus most of what's already been mentioned above.
 
2014-05-29 05:42:53 PM  
Cast iron skillet
immersion blender
mortar and pestle

We take cooking classes w/ a classically trained chef. He uses almost no gadgets except a stand mixer and an immersion blender. Once in a great while when there are a lot of people in a class he'll use a Cuisinart to chop vegetables.  He also puts down fancy knives -- he gets cheapies at Sam's Club every couple of years. For slipping cutting boards: put a damp towel underneath it.
 
2014-05-29 05:43:00 PM  
All kitchen utensils except good knives are a waste of your time and money
 
2014-05-29 05:44:35 PM  

exvaxman: Um, the items I cannot live without:
Vitamix
Vacuum tumbler
Souis vide unit
Pressure smoker
Ceramic kamaodo.


I have been suspiciously eye balling pressure smokers for a couple years.  Are they as magical as they look?
 
2014-05-29 05:45:05 PM  
Bread machine.
 
2014-05-29 05:46:28 PM  
img2.targetimg2.com
 
2014-05-29 05:46:32 PM  

mattador: Love my enameled cast iron dutch oven, but rarely use it (the wife doesn't like trying to clean it).
Wooden spoons for whatever.
Box grater for Cole slaw and mass shred cheese consumption.
Tongs for damn near everything.

And its been said, but bears repeating: wash your hands, dry em with a paper towel and throw it under your cutting board to prevent slipping while you chop.


Ya know and this is just a thought, you could clean it.
 
2014-05-29 05:47:49 PM  
Kitchen Aid, with all the attachments. Meat grinder, pasta roller, rotary slicer, etc.

Mochahete !

Immersion blender
 
2014-05-29 05:47:57 PM  
I love my Kitchenaide pedestal mixer, even though I only use it a couple times a year.  Usually in the Winter--to make marshmallow frosting for my birthday cake, and for making gingerbread men for Xmas.
 
2014-05-29 05:47:58 PM  

flucto: thisisarepeat: Absolutely, that thing does everything, it has a power takeoff on the front that you can rig to run a lot of otherwise manual tools like meat mixers for making sausage. I call it my kitchen tractor.

The sausage stuffer for the Kitchen Aid is close to useless. I many of the other attachments but that one is way too much pain to bother.


Yup.  Couldn't live without my Kitchen Aid for making bread and grinding meat, but after trying to use the sausage stuffer a couple of times I gave up and bought one of these:

cdn.lemproducts.com

Now I use the Kitchen Aid to make the sausage and the LEM to stuff it into casings and life is good.

Mmmmmm...sausage.
 
2014-05-29 05:48:34 PM  
img.fark.net
My actual go to...
 
2014-05-29 05:48:59 PM  

peacheslatour: Real Women Drink Akvavit: Not utensils or gadgets, but something no kitchen should be without - parchment paper and cheesecloth. Both of those are just so useful in all sorts of ways all over the house.

I have been wanting an actual iron rosette iron with different shapes, but can only find aluminum. My grandmother had one with all kinds of shapes and last I saw it was in the house in Posebyen, but last time I was there I couldn't find it. I think one of my cousins snagged it, so the quest continues.

I would love to have one of these.  I've seen them in catalogs- and yes they're aluminum.  My grandmother had a waffle iron that made flower and other shapes, I'm sure it went with some cousin as well. :(
I want to try to make chocolate waffles for waffle and ice cream sandwiches.


I remember the only time I spent Christmas in Norway as a little girl was the first time I had those kinds of cookies. You didn't see them where I grew up in LA. In Norway there's this tradition of "Seven Sorts" where you have to have seven sorts of cookies for Jul. My grandma hated baking anything but pies, so she "cheated" by doing "Seven Shapes" of rosette cookies. No one dared say a word, not even the neighbors. It's totally a nostalgia thing for me because my fat butt does not need more cookies - especially not fried cookies.
 
2014-05-29 05:50:05 PM  

peacheslatour: mattador: Love my enameled cast iron dutch oven, but rarely use it (the wife doesn't like trying to clean it).
Wooden spoons for whatever.
Box grater for Cole slaw and mass shred cheese consumption.
Tongs for damn near everything.

And its been said, but bears repeating: wash your hands, dry em with a paper towel and throw it under your cutting board to prevent slipping while you chop.

Ya know and this is just a thought, you could clean it.


What surface combinations cause this slippage?  I use my plastic (also Colorado shaped) cutting boards on granite counter tops and never have any slipping issues.
 
2014-05-29 05:50:56 PM  
The more I cook, the less I like gadgets, and, for that matter, specialized knives.  Give me a decent chef's knife and I'll be yards ahead of most people using specialized knives for the same task... with the exception of a *large* slicer for thin-slicing roasts / bacon... and even then, if the chef's knife is already dirty....

I see vacuum sealer and thermapen have been covered.

So, I'll add:

A decent deep fryer, digital + ready light / tones.  Soooooo much easier, cleaner, and more economical than trying to do it on the stove.  Anybody have a hack to get the Waring digital one up beyond its 375* max?

Sausage stuffer and dedicated meat grinder:  DO NOT ATTEMPT SAUSAGE IN A KITCHENAID.  So farkin' frustrating that I was ready to chuck the entire machine (and it's not a cheap one) along with the sausage already in it.  A real grinder is a -pleasure- (even the $50 one from Harbor Freight), and a real sausage stuffer ($100-150 from LEM; there are others) is *night*and*day* better.  Mmmm, homemade sausage from < $2/pd pork butt, nearly-free pork fat (though you have to find a friendly meat counter person) and some spices.  Awesome.  The KA attachment is great for making sauces, but absolutely abysmal for stuffing sausage and borderline, at best, as a grinder:  By comparison, the $50 HF cheapie gets -colder- as grinding goes on, not hotter, along with just being less of a struggle.

For low-and-slow smokin' 'q, wireless thermometers are *indispensable*.

I'd add "a good powered knife sharpener," but they can really fark up knives if used carelessly, so if you're not already comfortable with hand-sharpening, best to take them to a pro.  And even if you're good with one, it mostly sits collecting dust for weeks/months at a stretch, if you're careful with your knives....

generalDisdain: It slices meats, cheeses and vegetables, and is indispensable for dismembering bodies:


I'm toying with getting something like that -- how often do you use it?  Do you find it worth the large amount of space it takes up?  Is a home-grade one more trouble than it's worth, in the "don't bother if you don't want to spend $500-1000 on a commercial one" way?

Homemade bacon, roast beef, smoked meats all seem like good (if thin) reasons to get one....

Curious!
 
2014-05-29 05:52:10 PM  

farkingismybusiness: All my utensil needs are solved by Spatula City.


My favorite odd kitchen item is a Zyliss silicone spatula. One piece, heat proof, no places for food to hide. One of my peeves is cracks and crevices in food prep.
 
2014-05-29 05:53:31 PM  
www.realtor.com
 
2014-05-29 05:53:53 PM  
Mellon baller to remove the cores of apples, pears, etc. Even for eating apples "whole" so you don't have to nibble around the core.

ecx.images-amazon.com

Cheese plane to cut consistent slices off a block of cheese. If you have good knife-skills you could just use a knife but I find a plane to be quicker.

ecx.images-amazon.com
You should get one with a "mouth" wide enough to handle the largest cheese blocks you use.
 
2014-05-29 05:54:44 PM  

Real Women Drink Akvavit: my fat butt


Bring it to Zul.  Bring it......
 
2014-05-29 05:55:43 PM  
justinsomnia.org

cooking chopsticks are biatchin'.

Mine are hollow aluminum.
 
2014-05-29 05:58:27 PM  
Digital probe thermometer
Slow Cooker
Grill pan
Steamer tray
 
2014-05-29 05:58:46 PM  
I love my silicone oven mitt too.  So awesome when dealing with boiling water and steam.  Also radiator caps,  sure you could just wait for it to cool first but then the farker wouldn't be hot if I didn't have someplace to go would it?  The burn ward needs work too.
 
2014-05-29 05:59:09 PM  

flucto: peacheslatour: Osterizer blender

I know a Vitamix isn't cheap, but you'd never, ever Osterize again once you had one.


+1 My ex listed it on her side of the property settlement, non-negotiable. Finally got one of my own but I had to sell one of my kids to raise the money.
 
2014-05-29 05:59:31 PM  
Get a kitchen spider

www.chefshanekelly.com
 
2014-05-29 06:00:50 PM  
My go to kitchen utensil is my wife
 
2014-05-29 06:02:29 PM  

SFSailor: generalDisdain: It slices meats, cheeses and vegetables, and is indispensable for dismembering bodies:

I'm toying with getting something like that -- how often do you use it?  Do you find it worth the large amount of space it takes up?
Is a home-grade one more trouble than it's worth, in the "don't bother if you don't want to spend $500-1000 on a commercial one" way?
Homemade bacon, roast beef, smoked meats all seem like good (if thin) reasons to get one....
Curious!


It does take up a lot of space (and it's heavy as hell), but we have a place to store it when it's not in use. I would say it's worth it because we make our own roasts, corned beef, pastrami, etc...
It's a commercial-grade slicer with a 10" blade. I scored it off of craigslist for $75, (not $750, $75...)
I honestly wouldn't even consider a non-commercial model now, for obvious reasons.
Perhaps someone else in this thread has experience with non-commercial meat slicers, and can give some additional information.
 
2014-05-29 06:02:52 PM  

SpacemanSpoof: Instant hot-water spout on my sink - we go through literally gallons of tea in a month, and who wants to wait for water to boil?  Also handy for instant oatmeal, heating baby bottles, and many other uses


Jealous.  I microwave a large cup for 4ish minutes 3-4 times a day, but I want one of those.  Do you find it adds much to your electricity bill?

exvaxman: Ceramic kamaodo.


One better:  Chargriller Akorn $300 from Lowe's, with ~$20 in mods.  (a) If you tip it over, it doesn't explode like the ceramics, (b) the surface stays cool(ish) to the touch, unlike ceramics that eventually heat soak.  Oh, and (c) $1000+ left over for meat to put in it!

Just got mine and *love* it, after getting sick of fighting with a cheapie offset and the Duo consuming so much charcoal in indirect mode.  First, somewhat random, roast pork that came out was *eye*opening*.  Still learning, though.

mattador: Love my enameled cast iron dutch oven, but rarely use it (the wife doesn't like trying to clean it).


Acquire One Step cleaning powder.  Soak in hot water + One Step overnight.  Et voila, clean pan.  Initially needed for homebrew cleaning, but it comes in handy all over the kitchen!

(Oh, yeah, another one:  A basement full of homebrew gear, but the best addition to the collection was the plastic carboys.)


thisisarepeat: I have been suspiciously eye balling pressure smokers for a couple years.  Are they as magical as they look?


If you mean kamados like the Big Green Egg / Akorn / etc, YES, at least in my month-ish of ownership so far.  There's a learning curve, and they're VERY different from "how you used to do it," so do your homework, but... after years of hearing BGE cultists go on and on to unbelievable lengths, figuring they told themselves lies to justify $1000+ for a grill, I broke down and bought the Chargriller knock off.  It. Is. Awesome.

But do your homework (I'd suggest some sites, but don't know if that's kosher on Fark... so google for some forums or EIP), and if you like **lots** of smoke flavor in low-and-slow cooking, you might be disappointed -- rumor has it that they might not get smoky enough for some, but I haven't had the problem yet, and I like *lots* of smoke.   So, you might be disappointed... but probably won't be.

The truly shocking thing is how little charcoal it uses.  It is *awesome*.

Telephone Sanitizer Second Class: Yup.  Couldn't live without my Kitchen Aid for making bread and grinding meat, but after trying to use the sausage stuffer a couple of times I gave up and bought one of these:


Drat.  Beat me by 2 minutes.  That's what I get for blathering on.  LOVE my LEM stuffer.  The KA attachment is a horrible thing sent from the pits of hell.

And go ahead and get yourself the HF grinder for $50.  It's way better than the KA and fighting with a "jack of all trades" tool instead of getting the task-specific tool.
 
2014-05-29 06:02:54 PM  
Not that it's a necessity or my favorite tool but box graters are a thing of the past now that I discovered this  http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/50153180/#
No more slipping and taking a bit of knuckle off, grates right into its own bowl, and it's easier to clean.
 
2014-05-29 06:06:42 PM  

generalDisdain: It's a commercial-grade slicer with a 10" blade. I scored it off of craigslist for $75, (not $750, $75...)


Holy balls!  $75?  I'll give ya' a hunnert for it... : )

Nice find!  I'm definitely kinda-sorta looking, but haven't seen one less than $400-500 and am hesitant at that price.  I mean, that's a -lot- of pork for sausage and/or smoking!  But, $75?  No brainer.  Lucky bastid.

Also on the CL restaurant-gear hunt:  One of those dealieos they use in SF taquerias to *whoosh*whoooosh* steam your tortilla before heading down the burrito-makin' line.  Just cuz.

Damn, I may now have to up my CL game for a slicer.....
 
2014-05-29 06:07:11 PM  
dyozopqfp8ikx.cloudfront.netCould not live without this.
 
2014-05-29 06:10:03 PM  

softshoes: flucto: peacheslatour: Osterizer blender

I know a Vitamix isn't cheap, but you'd never, ever Osterize again once you had one.

+1 My ex listed it on her side of the property settlement, non-negotiable. Finally got one of my own but I had to sell one of my kids to raise the money.


Thats what happened to my marble mortar and pestle, Its been almost a decade and I havent replaced it, so meh.  It could have been a lot worse she wanted me to take her shiatty little Saluki and keep MY Dane.  I have unfortunately had to replace the Great  Dane.  Danes are also great kitchen utensils if you dont have a garbage disposal / mind entire meals disappearing from the counter in the time it takes to take a piss.
 
2014-05-29 06:14:42 PM  

oldfarthenry: I've gone "Luddite" and only use sharp rocks & logs.


Sure.
If you want to cut corners.

I prefer to use blunt rocks and mash food on a flat surface.
I then gather my own wood.
Which I light by flint stone or friction bow.
 
2014-05-29 06:16:27 PM  

buckler: I picked up a Thai "Kiwi" brand cleaver for about $4.00....


This. The Kiwi paring knife is also great.

Here's a link to 'The Wok Shop' 's Kiwi blades (I have B and F).

Love their Woks (and prices), and they were very nice.

                         ***********************

Here's an Amazon link to a Potato Ricer. a whopping $14.95, makes great mashed potatoes and very easy to clean.

On the more expensive end, love our Kuhn Rikon 2.5L Pressure cooker - It's tiny, (a frying pan really), with ridged bottom. It browns stuff down nicely, then pop the top on and cut your cooking time significantly. Again it is expensive but we've had ours for over a decade and haven't even had to replace the gasket. (wife using it to make rice atm).

You'll still need a bigger pressure cooker for other tasks; here's the best quick Google search of a combo deal that I could find - the steaming trivet is very useful
 
2014-05-29 06:17:26 PM  

thisisarepeat: you dont have a garbage disposal / mind entire meals disappearing from the counter in the time it takes to take a piss.


< pets my 50#, can't quite reach the counter and has been trained not to try, chow mix >

And to think I was considering / hunting for a Newf to rescue.  Danes sure seem to be great dogs, though!

Also for the list, come to think of it:  Not sure it's a kitchen implement, but I *could*not*live* without sparkling water on tap.  Haven't bought a soda, or bottle of spendy-water, since the day it went in.  Love it so much that's worth reducing the number of homebrews on tap to have it.

Oh, yeah, kegerator, too, but that's in the sportsbar/living room... does that count?
 
2014-05-29 06:17:47 PM  

LeroyBourne: [lh4.ggpht.com image 850x638]
If you've spent any amount of time in a restaurant and have knife skills I highly recommend Japanese steel over everything else. It holds its' blade better, it's so light, and when it does get dull is very easy to sharpen.


WANT
That looks like Damascus steel...which is partly the reason for my WANT.

Mostly it's because sharp knives are such a joy to use.
Dull ones (besides being unsafe) are a pain in the wazoo (or wherever the blade hits when it slips).
 
2014-05-29 06:18:24 PM  
A half-way decent chef's knife, chopping boards, and a meat thermometer. I've got a pretty bare bones kitchen.

But I'm getting a new cast iron pan after we move.
 
2014-05-29 06:18:32 PM  

SFSailor: SpacemanSpoof: Instant hot-water spout on my sink - we go through literally gallons of tea in a month, and who wants to wait for water to boil?  Also handy for instant oatmeal, heating baby bottles, and many other uses

Jealous.  I microwave a large cup for 4ish minutes 3-4 times a day, but I want one of those.  Do you find it adds much to your electricity bill?

exvaxman: Ceramic kamaodo.

One better:  Chargriller Akorn $300 from Lowe's, with ~$20 in mods.  (a) If you tip it over, it doesn't explode like the ceramics, (b) the surface stays cool(ish) to the touch, unlike ceramics that eventually heat soak.  Oh, and (c) $1000+ left over for meat to put in it!

Just got mine and *love* it, after getting sick of fighting with a cheapie offset and the Duo consuming so much charcoal in indirect mode.  First, somewhat random, roast pork that came out was *eye*opening*.  Still learning, though.

mattador: Love my enameled cast iron dutch oven, but rarely use it (the wife doesn't like trying to clean it).

Acquire One Step cleaning powder.  Soak in hot water + One Step overnight.  Et voila, clean pan.  Initially needed for homebrew cleaning, but it comes in handy all over the kitchen!

(Oh, yeah, another one:  A basement full of homebrew gear, but the best addition to the collection was the plastic carboys.)


thisisarepeat: I have been suspiciously eye balling pressure smokers for a couple years.  Are they as magical as they look?

If you mean kamados like the Big Green Egg / Akorn / etc, YES, at least in my month-ish of ownership so far.  There's a learning curve, and they're VERY different from "how you used to do it," so do your homework, but... after years of hearing BGE cultists go on and on to unbelievable lengths, figuring they told themselves lies to justify $1000+ for a grill, I broke down and bought the Chargriller knock off.  It. Is. Awesome.

But do your homework (I'd suggest some sites, but don't know if that's kosher on Fark... so google for some forums or EI ...


I was talking about the little counter top ones that look like pressure cookers.    I would love a big green egg, but I'm afraid I wouldn't like the feeling I would get staring at it through the back door while rolling pennies for gas (said the dipshiat with a bottle of Crown Royal XR in the pantry).
 
2014-05-29 06:19:27 PM  

Ego edo infantia cattus: [justinsomnia.org image 800x533]

cooking chopsticks are biatchin'.

Mine are hollow aluminum.


I do hope they've got insulated handles.  Or you have thick callouses.
 
2014-05-29 06:20:33 PM  
You know I sort of regret not registering for good kitchen knives when I got married.
 
2014-05-29 06:20:33 PM  
ninja bullet for grinding fresh roasted coffee beans
an original Poppery for roasting coffee beans 1/2 cup at a time (I like coffee but not a lot of it so I keep it cheap)
sprouting lids that fit over quart and 2 quart canning jars
cheese molds for making cheese out of homemade yogurt
wide mouth plastic funnel that fits wide and narrow mouth canning jars for making fermented cabbage
and currently the most important thing is my beer fermenter. yes.
 
2014-05-29 06:21:00 PM  
Use long chopsticks instead of tongs. Use regular chopsticks as reusable coffee stirrers.
 
2014-05-29 06:22:22 PM  
I have purchased four different garlic presses until I found one that I liked...and interestingly enough, it was just a cheap one that I found at Publix

/small delicate hands, so I need one that curves nicely in my palm
 
2014-05-29 06:22:43 PM  

thisisarepeat: Yes you need a separate stuffer, I use the vertical press, it works great. I use a seperate grinder as well because I make 50lb batches.


I have a the separate KA stuffer for the kitchen aid and it is useless. I also have a 10 pound canister stuffer that cranks out feet at a time. The grinder on the KA is ok, especially after you figure out how to sharpen the blades.
 
2014-05-29 06:25:06 PM  

DRTFA: I have two novelty cutting boards- one in the shape of Colorado and one in the shape of Hawaii.

/I use the Colorado cutting board a lot more than the Hawaii board.
//It takes too long to assmble the islands in the right order prior to using them.
///You'd think the Big Island would be the go-to island, but no.  Molokai.


Well of course it is.

imgcdn.geocaching.com
 
2014-05-29 06:25:32 PM  

Telephone Sanitizer Second Class: Yup. Couldn't live without my Kitchen Aid for making bread and grinding meat, but after trying to use the sausage stuffer a couple of times I gave up and bought one of these:

cdn.lemproducts.com

Now I use the Kitchen Aid to make the sausage and the LEM to stuff it into casings and life is good.

Mmmmmm...sausage.


yeah baby. I have the same thing and I love it. I randomly wake up and night and think about going down to make sausage. Can't believe how good it comes out. shiat now I have to go make some.
 
2014-05-29 06:25:51 PM  

Private_Citizen: cgraves67: Private_Citizen: Apple slicer. If you like apples, you want one of these:

We use ours for pears also and I even managed to wedge a pineapple too.

Wow! How hard did you have to push to get it through a pineapple?


Hard enough that I wouldn't do it again. Getting down the first few inches was easy, but the core widens towards the end and that is harder. I recall that I had to grip the cutting board with my fingers and push the wedges towards it with my thumbs.
 
2014-05-29 06:25:56 PM  
Alton covered his favorite countertop items in this weeks podcast (at 16:30):

http://www.nerdist.com/pepisode/the-alton-browncast-47-mailbag-grab-b a g/
 
2014-05-29 06:27:02 PM  

softshoes: +1 My ex listed it on her side of the property settlement, non-negotiable


THAT BIATCH/DICK. I am totally on your side on this one. Solidarity, brother/sister
 
2014-05-29 06:27:02 PM  

meanassian: As stupid as it is, this is one of my favorite little gadgets.  especially for making things like hollandaise.  Love me some Eggs Benedict.

[cdn.thisiswhatiwant.com image 228x500]


I see that it's a "butter cutter," but what does it actually do?  Slice butter into pats or something?  I'm honestly asking - I've never seen a gadget like this.
 
2014-05-29 06:27:45 PM  

tiamet4: I have an irrational love of wooden spoons. I use them for pretty much anything that doesn't strongly require another type of stirring or scooping utensil. I'm not sure why cooking and baking is more enjoyable/good tastes better when I use a wooden spoon but it does!

Also my Kitchenaid mixer and microplane zester.


I likes wooden spoons, too.
They don't scratch expensive 'non-stick' surfaces, don't melt at high heats, don't react with acid/alkaline foods and produce weird flavors...and there's just something about a wooden spoon that makes things BETTER.
 
2014-05-29 06:28:12 PM  
az163874.vo.msecnd.net One of these if you want to make your own fries or onion rings or just about any sliced food.

www.chefdepot.net
And a pair of these so you don't turn your fingers into french fries.
 
2014-05-29 06:28:18 PM  

DjangoStonereaver: Believe me, form matters in the kitchen:

[1.bp.blogspot.com image 575x780]


OOH! A sandwich maker!
 
2014-05-29 06:29:47 PM  

generalDisdain: SFSailor: generalDisdain: It slices meats, cheeses and vegetables, and is indispensable for dismembering bodies:

I'm toying with getting something like that -- how often do you use it?  Do you find it worth the large amount of space it takes up?
Is a home-grade one more trouble than it's worth, in the "don't bother if you don't want to spend $500-1000 on a commercial one" way?
Homemade bacon, roast beef, smoked meats all seem like good (if thin) reasons to get one....
Curious!

It does take up a lot of space (and it's heavy as hell), but we have a place to store it when it's not in use. I would say it's worth it because we make our own roasts, corned beef, pastrami, etc...
It's a commercial-grade slicer with a 10" blade. I scored it off of craigslist for $75, (not $750, $75...)
I honestly wouldn't even consider a non-commercial model now, for obvious reasons.
Perhaps someone else in this thread has experience with non-commercial meat slicers, and can give some additional information.


Oh man, I wish we had a place to store a commercial slicer, but our kitchen is small and already packed to the gills.  The only place I could think to put it would be in our garage.  I already keep a big stock pot and wok out there because they take up too much room otherwise.  But the garage is detached, and I can't imagine muscling something that bulky and heavy up the stairs and through the back door every time we wanted to use it.
 
2014-05-29 06:29:59 PM  

flucto: Gadgets I would not live without:

Vitamix
Kitchenaid mixer
meat grinder
stick blender
heavy duty masher
big-ass enameled cast iron pots with lids
pastry bags


I like you
 
2014-05-29 06:31:09 PM  

TommyJReed: [az163874.vo.msecnd.net image 800x800] One of these if you want to make your own fries or onion rings or just about any sliced food.

[www.chefdepot.net image 454x250]
And a pair of these so you don't turn your fingers into french fries.


The nice thing about mandolins / v-slicers is that they can be had on the cheap and if you are making things like onion soup they make quick work of the prep.
 
2014-05-29 06:33:02 PM  

Epic Fap Session: [www.4thegrill.com image 300x300]

Quicker than marinating

[toolwizard.com image 350x261]

They make me feel like the Wolverine when I BBQ.


I have a couple of 60cc feeding syringes and a spinal tap needle that makes for easy and delicious marinade injection.


Try mixing palm sugar, orange juice/apple juice/chardonnay, some sage, some meat tenderizer and reduce. Strain it well, inject into your chicken/turkey and cook at 300F until done. Amazing tasty and tender poultry
 
2014-05-29 06:33:11 PM  

thisisarepeat: I was talking about the little counter top ones that look like pressure cookers.    I would love a big green egg, but I'm afraid I wouldn't like the feeling I would get staring at it through the back door while rolling pennies for gas (said the dipshiat with a bottle of Crown Royal XR in the pantry).


And now you've given me something to Google.  Never heard of such a thing, but I imagine a countertop smoker could be quite handy in the winter.  Hmmm.

Fark the BGE.  Save up the $300 for an Akorn, or keep an eye out for sales -- there's rumor / report of seeing them < $200 from time to time.  And it pro'ly won't be too long until they're cheap in the CL secondary market with dumbasses buying them, thinking they cook like a Webber, and hating the results, then selling at a fire-sale price to get rid of it.

Heck, over a long enough time horizon, the thing will pay for itself in saved charcoal from how incredibly efficient they are, and the almost-unbelievable ability to kill a fire in minutes.
 
2014-05-29 06:35:47 PM  

flucto: thisisarepeat: Absolutely, that thing does everything, it has a power takeoff on the front that you can rig to run a lot of otherwise manual tools like meat mixers for making sausage. I call it my kitchen tractor.

The sausage stuffer for the Kitchen Aid is close to useless. I many of the other attachments but that one is way too much pain to bother.


The meat grinder is wonderful, though!

My indispensable:

Kitchen Aid
immersion blender
crock pot
electric kettle
 
2014-05-29 06:36:36 PM  

Lee451: Try mixing palm sugar, orange juice/apple juice/chardonnay, some sage, some meat tenderizer and reduce bacon fat. Strain it well, inject into your chicken/turkey brisket and cook smoke at 300F 225-250F until done. Amazing tasty and tender poultry actual food.


FTFM, YMMV. : )
 
2014-05-29 06:36:50 PM  

Zul the Magnificent: Purelilac: Headline said not vessels, but I adore my cast iron and enameled cast iron cookware.

I would shrivel up and die without my big cast-iron wok.


I thought I was the only one who went cast-iron for my wok.  I haul that thing out almost weekly for SFR (Stir-Fried-Random).  It used to be my go-to for deep frying until I got the enameled cast iron pot.

As far as my "can't live without" list?

Kitchen-Aid mixer
Food processor
Regular bulb whisk
SIlicone sauce whisk
Silicone-tipped spring-loaded tongs, in an assortment of sizes
Cheap set of nesting prep bowls

Oh, not on the "essential" list but I've grown very attached to having it around:

img.fark.net
 
2014-05-29 06:37:09 PM  

catmandu: The meat grinder is wonderful, though!


especially once you work out how to sharpen the blades.
 
2014-05-29 06:37:49 PM  

proteus_b: I like you


Let's pick out curtains.
 
2014-05-29 06:38:50 PM  

PullItOut: [dyozopqfp8ikx.cloudfront.net image 372x361]Could not live without this.


Now you're just showing off :)

/We really need to get together and do another tasting menu...
 
2014-05-29 06:39:31 PM  

catmandu: The meat grinder is wonderful, though!


I thought so, too... then I got an *actual* meat grinder and will *never* go back.  The KA attachments are now in the basement, pending a trip to Goodwill or similar.

If you grind meats regularly, get a real grinder.  A real one doesn't heat up and break the fat with extended use (the one I have actually gets *colder* the longer you use it), and is way faster / lower effort (and not awkwardly up in the air, if you're on the shorter side and the KA is on the counter).  Fundamentally, the lack of a cooling fan on the KA is, to my mind, a fatal design flaw.
 
2014-05-29 06:39:59 PM  

sdd2000: TommyJReed: [az163874.vo.msecnd.net image 800x800] One of these if you want to make your own fries or onion rings or just about any sliced food.

[www.chefdepot.net image 454x250]
And a pair of these so you don't turn your fingers into french fries.

The nice thing about mandolins / v-slicers is that they can be had on the cheap and if you are making things like onion soup they make quick work of the prep.


exactly,  I got my mom 2 of these for christmas last year after she broke her first one.  She decided that she didn't want an expensive one because she uses it so rarely and she got 2 years out of the first one.
One of my favorite time savers because I tend to slice and dice a lot of things when I cook.
 
2014-05-29 06:40:53 PM  

peacheslatour: flucto: peacheslatour: Osterizer blender

I know a Vitamix isn't cheap, but you'd never, ever Osterize again once you had one.

Fair point, but after living with a cheap drugstore blender for years, the Osterizer is like heaven.  My old plastic one would leak hot soup all over the place and couldn't crush ice for shiat.


That is when you move up to a Ninja. Mine was only $100 and well worth it.
 
2014-05-29 06:42:14 PM  

praxcelis: Oh, not on the "essential" list but I've grown very attached to having it around:


I'll second that.  This past winter was the first I ran a grow light over herbs, and it'll happen every year from now on.  Very nice to have.  I'm even considering diving into figuring out how to hydro/aero/something-grow tomatoes out of season.

Plus, it's fun watching cops come to a screeching halt with the ridiculous suspicion that I'd be growing something I am not supposed to right there in the window like a dumbass!
 
2014-05-29 06:43:54 PM  

Lee451: peacheslatour: flucto: peacheslatour: Osterizer blender

I know a Vitamix isn't cheap, but you'd never, ever Osterize again once you had one.

Fair point, but after living with a cheap drugstore blender for years, the Osterizer is like heaven.  My old plastic one would leak hot soup all over the place and couldn't crush ice for shiat.

That is when you move up to a Ninja. Mine was only $100 and well worth it.


I don't know anything about the Ninja but the vitamix is a beast. It's huge because it's got such a gigantic motor. This thing is not hype at all, it's a beast.
 
2014-05-29 06:46:01 PM  
Slap chop or variation, small whisk, soft tip tongs, basting brush, digital meat thermometer with remote receiver.
 
2014-05-29 06:47:38 PM  

SFSailor: Lee451: Try mixing palm sugar, orange juice/apple juice/chardonnay, some sage, some meat tenderizer and reduce bacon fat. Strain it well, inject into your chicken/turkey brisket and cook smoke at 300F 225-250F until done. Amazing tasty and tender poultry actual food.

FTFM, YMMV. : )



Bacon fat works well. I did the apple juice/palm sugar on my Thanksgiving turkey and I was amazed at how well it turned out. 

/It just depends on what flavors you want.
//I still love my 1963 Good Housekeeping cookbook. The only one you will ever need.
///Recipe? Where we're going we don't need a recipe....
 
2014-05-29 06:49:41 PM  

flucto: Lee451: peacheslatour: flucto: peacheslatour: Osterizer blender

I know a Vitamix isn't cheap, but you'd never, ever Osterize again once you had one.

Fair point, but after living with a cheap drugstore blender for years, the Osterizer is like heaven.  My old plastic one would leak hot soup all over the place and couldn't crush ice for shiat.

That is when you move up to a Ninja. Mine was only $100 and well worth it.

I don't know anything about the Ninja but the vitamix is a beast. It's huge because it's got such a gigantic motor. This thing is not hype at all, it's a beast.


The vitamix may be more powerful. The Ninja has a 900 watt motor; I have no idea what the other brands come with.
 
2014-05-29 06:50:02 PM  
Our spiral pineapple cutter is pretty nifty and when making homemade salsa my Slap Chop is a Godsend!
 
2014-05-29 06:50:03 PM  

RexTalionis: As far as I'm concerned, the only knife a cook needs is a Chinese cleaver. It cuts, it slices, it cleaves through bone and yet you can even use it to pare and shave. It is, by far, the most versatile cooking knife out there.

[www.paulsfinest.com image 700x283]


Second this.  Also my nonstick heat resistant spatula and tongs.  If I want to get really snooty in an Asian sort of way, chopsticks (because they can be used to strain water from a pot while keeping solids in, used as de facto tongs if you don't have those handy, you can use them to stir, whip eggs/salad dressings... the only thing they fail at is to ladle out soup or cut things).
 
2014-05-29 06:50:24 PM  
Count me in to the cast iron fan club. My clever husband built this rack in our garage for me. Not sure why the pic is skewed. iPad thing I guess.

img.fark.net
 
2014-05-29 06:54:05 PM  

SquiggsIN: a surprising number of farkers seem to really enjoy their sausage. I'm no peta-flag waving vegan but, I don't eat sausage, at all.


I'm a vegan about 5 days a week but IMO if you think you don't like sausage it's because you've only had bad sausage.
 
2014-05-29 06:54:58 PM  

SFSailor: praxcelis: Oh, not on the "essential" list but I've grown very attached to having it around:

I'll second that.  This past winter was the first I ran a grow light over herbs, and it'll happen every year from now on.  Very nice to have.  I'm even considering diving into figuring out how to hydro/aero/something-grow tomatoes out of season.

Plus, it's fun watching cops come to a screeching halt with the ridiculous suspicion that I'd be growing something I am not supposed to right there in the window like a dumbass!


Coffee grinders are great for grinding um...herbs as well.
 
2014-05-29 06:56:35 PM  
Wood spoons. I use them with practically anything I cook. I like that they are safe to use no matter what type of pot/pan/skillet you're using.
 
2014-05-29 07:00:39 PM  

SquiggsIN: thisisarepeat: SFSailor: praxcelis: Oh, not on the "essential" list but I've grown very attached to having it around:

I'll second that.  This past winter was the first I ran a grow light over herbs, and it'll happen every year from now on.  Very nice to have.  I'm even considering diving into figuring out how to hydro/aero/something-grow tomatoes out of season.

Plus, it's fun watching cops come to a screeching halt with the ridiculous suspicion that I'd be growing something I am not supposed to right there in the window like a dumbass!

Coffee grinders are great for grinding um...herbs as well.

I've used my ninja for everything from coriander seeds to Mexican ditch weed.


I'm going to have to finally watch the ninja channel, I was under the impression it was just an expensive blender.
 
2014-05-29 07:02:16 PM  

SquiggsIN: a surprising number of farkers seem to really enjoy their sausage. I'm no peta-flag waving vegan but, I don't eat sausage, at all.


The nice thing about DIY sausage is that you know -exactly- what went into it, including how fresh the meat was, how much (of what kind of) fat, spices, etc.  I've conducted an unintended experiment (aka "forgot it was in the fridge") and was -shocked- by how fresh the sausage seemed a week+ later, compared to store bought... which just reinforces that for site-made sausage, they're chucking in the old stuff, and for off-site-made, well, it's been sitting, shipped, sitting again, etc.

Really no comparison.  It's a bit of work, but worth it.

SquiggsIN: It has more to do with knowing how it is made. I won't even eat chicken skin and i trim all the fat i can from any meat. so I'm really unwilling to chop up fat with the meat to eat it.


We are very different, you and I.  I may have happened to pick up 5-10 pounds of pork fat from my new meat counter friend just a few days ago.  And 5 pounds of pork and 10-15 of beef a week or so ago.  Now to find a source of duck fat pre-commercial-rendering!

Hint:  Depending on how you cook it / with it, not all the fat in the recipe winds up, you know, in your mouth. : ) And as far as health concerns, I'd rather have a bit of extra fat (and, hence, flavor and texture) in my sausage than a bun filled with pointless calories wrapped around it!
 
2014-05-29 07:02:20 PM  

praxcelis: I thought I was the only one who went cast-iron for my wok


Yeah, the big cast-iron one is my 2-3x week thing. I've had it for a number of years now, and it's developed a totally frictionless surface.

I also have a carbon steel one that I use for quickly doing up some veggies, that kind of thing.  Heats up to furious in about a minute and a half.
 
2014-05-29 07:02:22 PM  

SquiggsIN: That's a lot of cast iron! How big is your family? I can't imagine needing that many pieces cooking for two.


Over the years I've accumulated some, then got married to a guy who had some too. Pretty much one of every size. There are three I use all the time. My son will get a few pieces when he moves out on his own.
 
2014-05-29 07:05:48 PM  
chef'n double-headed (one-piece, fully sealed) silicone spatulas
tawa (good for heating tortillas, making roti, grilled cheese, toasting buns, hot dogs, patrami and onions)
nickel-coated cast iron skillet (bullet-proof cast iron cooking without the headaches)
cast iron mortar and pestle - the extra weight does all of the work
breville toaster oven
propane burner in that backyard that allows me to cook things on raging high heat (searing steaks and stir-fry *see nickel-coated cast iron skillet*) or cooking things that will splatter (burger patties) or leave lingering smells/make it difficult to breathe (curries, roasting habaneros/jalapenos)
 
2014-05-29 07:05:54 PM  
img.fark.net
Get one of these suckers and use Reverse Sear technique on your steak. I personally finish on the grill but you will not find a lazier way to make perfect unfarkable steak in your life. It's like Sous Vide without all the expensive equipment and time wasting. I sit on my ass until the steak reaches 115 degrees, then I go turn on the grill. Steak reaches 125 I take it out and head to the grill. Perfectly pink right to the edge of the meat after I sear the shiat out of it for a few minutes each side.
 
2014-05-29 07:06:12 PM  

SquiggsIN: abhorrent1: My go to kitchen utensil is my wife

Way to live up to "misogynist" like my fark tag for you


derp
 
2014-05-29 07:06:37 PM  

freetomato: My son will get a few pieces when he moves out on his own.


This, Ladies and Gentlemen, is Quality Parenting.
 
2014-05-29 07:07:01 PM  
A KitchenAid mixer with a set of pasta rollers/cutters. Even if you never use it for anything but making pasta, it's worth it.
 
2014-05-29 07:09:53 PM  
Vita-Mix
Vacuum Sealer
Box Wine
 
2014-05-29 07:10:46 PM  

Robo Beat: A KitchenAid mixer with a set of pasta rollers/cutters. Even if you never use it for anything but making pasta, it's worth it.


What he said.
 
2014-05-29 07:12:40 PM  
I could not live without my can opener. How else am i going to get to that succulent corned beef hash?
 
2014-05-29 07:15:41 PM  

abhorrent1: SquiggsIN: abhorrent1: My go to kitchen utensil is my wife

Way to live up to "misogynist" like my fark tag for you

derp


I bet you're fun at parties.

shrew tag?
 
2014-05-29 07:17:13 PM  

peacheslatour: mattador: Love my enameled cast iron dutch oven, but rarely use it (the wife doesn't like trying to clean it).
Wooden spoons for whatever.
Box grater for Cole slaw and mass shred cheese consumption.
Tongs for damn near everything.

And its been said, but bears repeating: wash your hands, dry em with a paper towel and throw it under your cutting board to prevent slipping while you chop.

Ya know and this is just a thought, you could clean it.


Psh.  I cooked.  And besides that thing is heavy.
 
2014-05-29 07:18:45 PM  

Phil Moskowitz: [img.fark.net image 297x300]
Get one of these suckers and use Reverse Sear technique on your steak. I personally finish on the grill but you will not find a lazier way to make perfect unfarkable steak in your life. It's like Sous Vide without all the expensive equipment and time wasting. I sit on my ass until the steak reaches 115 degrees, then I go turn on the grill. Steak reaches 125 I take it out and head to the grill. Perfectly pink right to the edge of the meat after I sear the shiat out of it for a few minutes each side.


Wow. Thanks for that.
 
2014-05-29 07:25:24 PM  

Damnhippyfreak: Wow. Thanks for that.


Make sure there's enough oil/butter whatever on your steak when it goes on the grill to cause a mini fire for searing. You need to get the crust on quickly or it'll overcook. You can dink with the temperature depending on how you like your steak finished. If you pan finish, just use their technique. I don't rest my steak before I sear when I'm doing it on the grill. I rest after.
 
2014-05-29 07:27:13 PM  
Oooh, one more:  If you keep your house cool in the winter, little plastic/rubber plate-heater-things that warm your plate in the microwave.  Indispensable in the chilly-temps months.

I'd add vacuum wine savers, but can't remember the last time I saved part of a bottle of wine.  They work pretty well, though.

How about the flip side?

Pointless Shiat Going To Goodwill After Cleaning Out The Kitchen Last Week (mostly gifts with the factory seal intact, or used once or twice and stuffed in a deep, dark cabinet):

Salad spinner.
Panini press.
Ice shaver.
Fish-basket-thing for grill.
Beer can chicken stand gizmo pointless thing.
Stupid spaghetti-straining-spoon-thing.  Pointless with a proper pasta pot.

Things about which I may be in the minority, also in the Goodwill-bound box(es):

Garlic press.  WTF?  Smash, mince, done.  Hasn't been used in years.

Multiple crock pots.  I tried.  I really did.  No meat coming out of a crock pot tastes as good as if cooked *any* other way.  And the one thing that comes close (soups) can be done in advance in large batches and frozen in small batches to be just as convenient.  Take up too much space, not one has been used in years.

Big, cheap food processor.  Maybe expensive ones are worth it, but my cheap experiment is now never used, unnecessarily hard to clean vs. you know, a knife, and doesn't work well.  A mini one is handy sometimes, but the big one's not worth the space.

Several cast iron pans:  Here again, I tried.  But if ya' look at it objectively, they're heavy, fragile, heat up -way- too slowly, then stay hot far too long, and come complete with a super-convenient blazing hot handle.  Then, when done, they're awkward to clean and rust if you don't take care of them properly.  Dumb all around.  I know there are farkers in here professing their undying love, but I'll never understand it.   I'll give a fark about cast iron, and reconsider, when more than a handful of chefs use them in restaurant kitchens; anything else is a mix of nostalgia, self-delusion, and self-appointed unjustified self righteousness.

Any other bad / counterproductive / stupid "why did I buy this?" suggestions?
 
2014-05-29 07:27:22 PM  

Phil Moskowitz: Get one of these suckers and use Reverse Sear technique on your steak.


I've been doing more or less that for decades and even when people ask me "omg how did you make this taste so good?" when I tell them they tell me I'm doing it wrong.

And if you knew...
 
2014-05-29 07:28:14 PM  

sleeps in trees: Off topic, my husband bought duck legs and I've never made them before. Any tips


You're looking for confit?
 
2014-05-29 07:29:11 PM  

mattador: peacheslatour: mattador: Love my enameled cast iron dutch oven, but rarely use it (the wife doesn't like trying to clean it).
Wooden spoons for whatever.
Box grater for Cole slaw and mass shred cheese consumption.
Tongs for damn near everything.

And its been said, but bears repeating: wash your hands, dry em with a paper towel and throw it under your cutting board to prevent slipping while you chop.

Ya know and this is just a thought, you could clean it.

Psh.  I cooked.  And besides that thing is heavy.


lol.  My hubby and I have the same deal- I cook he cleans up.
 
2014-05-29 07:32:45 PM  

sleeps in trees: Off topic, my husband bought duck legs and I've never made them before.  Any tips?


Confit.  Dead easy.  Super delicious.  But you'll have to find some duck fat... apparently, olive oil works too, but why skimp, if you can find the fat?
 
2014-05-29 07:34:18 PM  

flucto: Phil Moskowitz: Get one of these suckers and use Reverse Sear technique on your steak.

I've been doing more or less that for decades and even when people ask me "omg how did you make this taste so good?" when I tell them they tell me I'm doing it wrong.

And if you knew...


It's a take it to your grave technique. I'll never cook steak, hell grilled meat, any other way. It's half as time consuming and twice as good.
 
2014-05-29 07:38:28 PM  

SpacemanSpoof: Instant hot-water spout on my sink


Man.  I've wanted this for soooooooo long, but I don't think I can justify it since I don't really go through much tea and have no kids or anything that would require boiling water in a flash whenever I need it.

Then again, I DO tend to go on ramen binges...
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-05-29 07:38:32 PM  

sleeps in trees: flucto: DGS: We recently got an enameled cast-iron dutch oven. 5 qt I think. It's fantastic.. finally wifey can make plov. And I did duck legs for the first time. Being able to cook and then transition a pot straight to the oven is sweet.

Yeah, totally. I roast meat in them, make Bolognese, fry chickens, etc etc. indispensable IMO.

Off topic, my husband bought duck legs and I've never made them before.  Any tips?


YGM :)
 
2014-05-29 07:41:02 PM  

SFSailor: SpacemanSpoof: Instant hot-water spout on my sink - we go through literally gallons of tea in a month, and who wants to wait for water to boil?  Also handy for instant oatmeal, heating baby bottles, and many other uses

Jealous.  I microwave a large cup for 4ish minutes 3-4 times a day, but I want one of those.  Do you find it adds much to your electricity bill?


I haven't really noticed a dramatic increase.  The tank is well insulated, so I don't imagine that it draws too much power to maintain the heat.  Plus, what it does use is somewhat offset by not running the microwave or stove as much.

The real pain was installing it.  I didn't want to drill a new hole in my counter, so I had to put it in place of the sink sprayer.  But I didn't want to give up the sprayer either, so I wound up changing out the whole faucet for one with an integrated sprayer.  Plus, I'm no plumber, so it's always a bad day when I have to get under a sink.  Still totally worth it though. :)
 
2014-05-29 07:42:45 PM  

flucto: I've been doing more or less that for decades and even when people ask me "omg how did you make this taste so good?" when I tell them they tell me I'm doing it wrong.


I've asked guests for their arrival time, mentioning that I have to get the steaks in the grill an hour or so ahead of time.  More than once I've heard a variation of, "I was really terrified of your steak.  An hour?  I expected to have to find fast food on the way home.  But this is fantastic!"

Also a nice addition to steaks?  Render some beef fat and keep it in the fridge, then melt a bit and pour over the steak before serving, instead of butter.  *boom* steakhouse steak quality.

peacheslatour: lol.  My hubby and I have the same deal- I cook he cleans up.


Unless he enjoys cleaning as much as you enjoy cooking, THIS IS NOT A DEAL.  I've seen more than one divorce bubble up fundamentally driven in large part by this "deal."  Cleaning farking sucks, especially if the "cook" "enjoys" USING EVERY DAMNED UTENSIL IN THE KITCHEN POINTLESSLY, THOUGHTLESSLY, AND INSENSITIVELY, CREATING WAY MORE MESS THAN NECESSARY.

"I cook, you clean" is the most self-serving, stupid "deal" one half can inflict on the couple, unless the interests are exactly opposite -- one hates cooking and loves cleaning, and 't'other hates cleaning and loves cooking... but that's rare.  Usually, one "loves" cooking, and the other is stuck with "I cooked -- you clean."  And that is flat out messed up bullshiat that will silently seethe and build contempt until one day *bam* done.

Pet peave.  Your husband won't tell you.  I just did.
 
2014-05-29 07:46:06 PM  

SpacemanSpoof: Plus, I'm no plumber, so it's always a bad day when I have to get under a sink.


Oh, man, is there anything house-maintenance related that sucks more than plumbing?  Awkward, uncomfortable, routinely unsuccessful in fiddly, farking annoying ways.... I mean, I'd rather crawl around in the hot, fiberglass-filled attic than deal with plumbing!

I *really* don't want to drill a hole in the new cast iron sink, and the RO tap is more important, so I've pretty much squelched my own interest in a hot water dispenser... but still... it'd be awfully nice....

Still, thanks for the feedback!  Enjoy it, ya' lucky farker.
 
2014-05-29 07:46:51 PM  
Swim goggles. Seriously. To chop onions. Nothing else works as well to prevent tears.
 
2014-05-29 07:50:38 PM  

sleeps in trees: I honestly don't know. He just came home with them and I have no idea where to start. I just want to cook them so they taste good.


I think rather than making you nuts with instructions for confit, which as has been pointed out requires you poach them in duck fat ( a lot of duck fat ), I suggest you do this, they will be good:

Marinate them in a sauce made from:

hoisin sauce
Chopped, peeled and grated fresh ginger
minced garlic
brown sugar
chopped scallion (the white and green parts)
plenty of fresh cilantro leaves and stems, minced
1 tablespoon sesame oil

the proportions are not super critical. Hard to blow it.

Then grill them until they reach 155. A tad of char won't hurt. Serve with salad and maybe mashed potatoes if you feel starchy.
 
2014-05-29 07:54:11 PM  

Vodka Zombie: SpacemanSpoof: Instant hot-water spout on my sink

Man.  I've wanted this for soooooooo long, but I don't think I can justify it since I don't really go through much tea and have no kids or anything that would require boiling water in a flash whenever I need it.

Then again, I DO tend to go on ramen binges...


Instant hot water spout is a bit lazy.  But who am I to criticize, I installed low volume faucets over the coffee machine and the dog bowl.  Who has time for pouring?
 
2014-05-29 07:55:45 PM  

sleeps in trees: flucto: sleeps in trees: I honestly don't know. He just came home with them and I have no idea where to start. I just want to cook them so they taste good.

I think rather than making you nuts with instructions for confit, which as has been pointed out requires you poach them in duck fat ( a lot of duck fat ), I suggest you do this, they will be good:

Marinate them in a sauce made from:

hoisin sauce
Chopped, peeled and grated fresh ginger
minced garlic
brown sugar
chopped scallion (the white and green parts)
plenty of fresh cilantro leaves and stems, minced
1 tablespoon sesame oil

the proportions are not super critical. Hard to blow it.

Then grill them until they reach 155. A tad of char won't hurt. Serve with salad and maybe mashed potatoes if you feel starchy.

Damn that sounds tasty.  Is the fat going to be a problem on the grill?  I'm not the griller, he is.


He bought the damned things, make him grill them.
 
2014-05-29 07:56:43 PM  

sleeps in trees: Damn that sounds tasty. Is the fat going to be a problem on the grill? I'm not the griller, he is.


It will be a exciting but move them around and keep the grill level low enough so that they don't burn too much. Don't scrimp on the scallions and ginger.  Hoisin is magical stuff. Try this on duck breasts too.
 
2014-05-29 08:00:14 PM  

DGS: New Years present


Whoa whoa whoa - that's a thing?
 
2014-05-29 08:01:47 PM  

sleeps in trees: Although I appreciate your point if you are *bam* done over the division of one chore without discussion, you have more problems than cooking and cleaning.  Lucky for me I do both because I'm a pick.  I'd be an OCD shiathead if he didn't do it "right" which is my problem, not his.  Vaccuming is the only chore I don't do and he's pretty cool doing it.


You're self aware, but many aren't.

I've known 3-4 divorced couples where one side or the other cited "I HATE YOU COOKED SO I HAVE TO I CLEAN!" as a root cause.  Yeah, there are other, bigger problems if you can't talk about that issue in a productive manner, but still, why implement a stupid "rule" that's nothing but trouble?  I still know a fair number of (usually female) couple-halves who laugh and say, "oh, for us, I cook, [the other] cleans" in a lighthearted, dismissive way.  Occasionally a look will pass quickly over the other's face.  I've got money on the Don't re: lasting for all of them.

It's a simple, clear, common -- and *wrong* -- mechanism in many relationships.

As for cleaning and cooking gadgets, I don't know if a drying rack is -ever- worth $50, but the Oxo one newly added to the kitchen is awfully nice, with a very thoughtful design....
 
2014-05-29 08:13:44 PM  

thisisarepeat: abhorrent1: SquiggsIN: abhorrent1: My go to kitchen utensil is my wife

Way to live up to "misogynist" like my fark tag for you

derp

I bet you're fun at parties.

shrew tag?


welcometofark.jpg

/derp
 
2014-05-29 08:17:22 PM  

LlamaGirl: DjangoStonereaver: Believe me, form matters in the kitchen:

[1.bp.blogspot.com image 575x780]

What is she doing squeezing an entire lemon that isn't halved, into a cast iron skillet? WHAT IS SHE DOING?!?!?!?!?

I am finding it difficult to believe she is actually cooking anything at all.

Lemon? I didn't see any lemon.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-05-29 08:17:33 PM  

GnomePaladin: DGS: New Years present

Whoa whoa whoa - that's a thing?


Yeah, but probably not for the reason you think.

/Russians don't celebrate Christmas.. their big family holiday with a tree, a feast, and presents? New Years
 
2014-05-29 08:21:14 PM  

Private_Citizen: cgraves67: Private_Citizen: Apple slicer. If you like apples, you want one of these:

We use ours for pears also and I even managed to wedge a pineapple too.

Wow! How hard did you have to push to get it through a pineapple?


upload.wikimedia.org
 
2014-05-29 08:38:49 PM  

DGS: Purelilac: I'm not into kitchen gadgets, but I do like my Ninja if I have to fine chop a shiatload of veggies.

LlamaGirl: Immersion blender.

If you make soups or sauces, they are amaaaaaaaaazing tools.
I like to use mine to make fancy scarmbly eggs as well.

Heh, I have a Ninja immersion blender that separated out so the motor can be attached to a standard blender. First thing I thought of. And you both beat me to it. Love this thing. So useful.

[media.tumblr.com image 456x342]


I have a Cuisinart immersion blender like that Ninja.  It's amazing how many people ask me what it is when I'm making dinner for company.  I mutter "boat motor" and proceed to puree the hell out of something.  It's also great for emulsifying things right in a cooking pot.  And the chopper bin attachment is perfect of small batches of nuts etc.  I use that thing at least twice a week.

Otherwise, I need some sort of a Crock Pot, nothing can substitute for a good slow cooker.

And in good weather, I just forgo the kitchen altogether and resort to this:

www.discountwebergrills.org

/except mine is green
 
2014-05-29 08:41:22 PM  

Phil Moskowitz: Damnhippyfreak: Wow. Thanks for that.

Make sure there's enough oil/butter whatever on your steak when it goes on the grill to cause a mini fire for searing. You need to get the crust on quickly or it'll overcook. You can dink with the temperature depending on how you like your steak finished. If you pan finish, just use their technique. I don't rest my steak before I sear when I'm doing it on the grill. I rest after.


Thanks again. All I need now is the weekend to get here a bit sooner. Looking forward to trying this out.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-05-29 08:43:40 PM  

DrunkWithImpotence: I mutter "boat motor"


Totally stealing this.
 
kth
2014-05-29 08:45:05 PM  
1. Hotel pans.
We have all sizes. We use them for prep bowls, casseroles, roasting pans, cooling leftovers. The shallow fourths fit perfectly in the crisper to hold meat that is defrosting. Cheap as hell at junk stores and not that expensive at restaurant supply stores.

images.zesco.com

2. Sous Vide. It was a wedding gift. It is awesome.
3. Magic Bullet. Excellent for Babaganouj, hummus, bass, whatever else you want to make.
4. Viking Mixer. It moved in with me before my husband did. I coveted it.
5. Good cheese slicer, whatever that means for you.  For me it is this:
www.cheesemakingshop.co.uk

6. Oxo Peeler. The cheap ones suck for lefties.
 
2014-05-29 08:53:55 PM  
For when my GF cooks:

img.fark.net
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-05-29 08:58:24 PM  

sdd2000: For when my GF cooks:

[img.fark.net image 850x796]


Ok, I laughed :D
 
2014-05-29 09:00:44 PM  

DGS: sdd2000: For when my GF cooks:

[img.fark.net image 850x796]

Ok, I laughed :D


Has the added benefit of being true. The only thing she has successfully made in the kitchen has been several floods and a few small fires. She actually almost burned the house down while making hard boiled eggs for egg salad. I now do most of the cooking or we go out.
 
zeg
2014-05-29 09:03:52 PM  

Private_Citizen: Apple slicer. If you like apples, you want one of these:
[img.fark.net image 530x329]


I used to like the apple slicer, but I've changed my mind on that one. I prefer slicing with a chef's knife.

The change occurred when I had the following epiphany: you don't actually have to slice the apple radially.

My new technique is to slice both sides off just outside the core, then laying the core section down and slicing off the remaining sections. This leaves the core in a square segment. I then slice the four good parts to the desired width (or not).

This has the drawback that not every slice is the same size, but other than the "corner" pieces, they're reasonably close. The benefits are that it's easier to wash a knife than the slicer doodad, this works on any size apple(*), and is as fast or faster---especially if you include the time to dig through the drawer for the slicer vs. pulling the knife out of the block.

(*) exception: the wolf river apples I got last year, which were the size of small cantaloupes. My knife was not long enough to do those safely.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-05-29 09:04:26 PM  

sdd2000: DGS: sdd2000: For when my GF cooks:

[img.fark.net image 850x796]

Ok, I laughed :D

Has the added benefit of being true. The only thing she has successfully made in the kitchen has been several floods and a few small fires. She actually almost burned the house down while making hard boiled eggs for egg salad. I now do most of the cooking or we go out.


Oh jeez. Need to get her some basics classes.
 
2014-05-29 09:20:39 PM  
SFSailor:
peacheslatour: lol.  My hubby and I have the same deal- I cook he cleans up.

Unless he enjoys cleaning as much as you enjoy cooking, THIS IS NOT A DEAL.  I've seen more than one divorce bubble up fundamentally driven in large part by this "deal."  Cleaning farking sucks, especially if the "cook" "enjoys" USING EVERY DAMNED UTENSIL IN THE KITCHEN POINTLESSLY, THOUGHTLESSLY, AND INSENSITIVELY, CREATING WAY MORE MESS THAN NECESSARY.

"I cook, you clean" is the most self-serving, stupid "deal" one half can inflict on the couple, unless the interests are exactly opposite -- one hates cooking and loves cleaning, and 't'other hates cleaning and loves cooking... but that's rare.  Usually, one "loves" cooking, and the other is stuck with "I cooked -- you clean."  And that is flat out messed up bullshiat that will silently seethe and build contempt until one day *bam* done.

Pet peave.  Your husband won't tell you.  I just did.


No. I clean as I go. The only thing he has to do  is wash a pot.  We both load the dishwasher- he rinses, I load.  Plus the only thing he knows how to cook is breakfast.  Cold cereal and toast.
/ We've been happily married for thirty four years.
 
2014-05-29 09:33:27 PM  

flucto: softshoes: +1 My ex listed it on her side of the property settlement, non-negotiable

THAT BIATCH/DICK. I am totally on your side on this one. Solidarity, brother/sister


She's the biatch, according to her I'm the dick. In all fairness to her I'd never heard of a Vitamix till I met her and her mother gave it to us for a wedding present. A pretty big present back in the 70's. That didn't stop me from wanting to fly out the door with it at the end. As I said all's well now I have one and the gadget I treasure above all others.
 
2014-05-29 09:35:47 PM  

softshoes: back in the 70's.


*TEAM GEEZER*  - but get off my lawn.

//fistbump
 
2014-05-29 09:42:16 PM  
img.fark.net

/Can't believe I'm the first with this.
 
2014-05-29 10:27:44 PM  
locking tongs - not much you can't do with them.  I actually prefer my cheap supply store version better than my sexy OXO tongs.  indispensable tool.

microplane (fine and coarse) - quite simply the best quality graters I've come across.  you'd be surprised how much you'd use them adding a quick flavor boost from some citrus zest or fresh ground spice.  even little touches like chocolate shavings to desserts and beverages don't take any real skill to add but enhance look and flavor with minimal effort.

coffee grinder (for spice mixes and rubs, err... and coffee) - I've mixed spices by hand but I've been using the grinder more lately for uniformity, in both mixing and coarseness, and I've been liking it.

mortar and pestle (mexican molcajete) - will add a whole new dimension to your cooking.

Jaccard Supertendermatic (48 blade meat tenderizer) - once you've used one you can't go back.  I gotta thank Will Harris from White Oak Pastures for the tip.

marinade injector - still more novelty than necessity to me but you'll never eat boring meat again.  if I lose one I find myself eventually replacing it.

instant read digital thermometer - I can pretty much touch test most cuts of meat for doneness or knife check poultry, but the instant read is a good backup for when I'm cooking something I'm less familiar with.

beer can chicken rack - just do it.
 
2014-05-29 10:40:42 PM  
My Kitchen Aid stand mixer, biatches.
 
2014-05-29 10:51:08 PM  

DGS: flucto: big-ass enameled cast iron pots with lids

We recently got an enameled cast-iron dutch oven. 5 qt I think. It's fantastic.. finally wifey can make plov. And I did duck legs for the first time. Being able to cook and then transition a pot straight to the oven is sweet.


Ok, I know I'm really late to the thread, but can you please post your plov recipe? We had an exchange student from Turkmenistan a few years ago, and I could never find a plov recipe that turned out right.

He said my somsas and manti were delicious, though.
 
2014-05-29 11:14:40 PM  
Oh, I just remembered: a digital timer. I can't imagine cooking without one.
 
2014-05-29 11:16:03 PM  
I'm a little late to the party here, but I'll add mine.

Micro planer
Kitchen Aid stand mixer
Vacuum sealer
Immersion blender
Pasta roller- love me some fresh pasta

Surprised to see such reverence for the garlic press. And it seems like I've had more luck than others with the KA grinder and sausage stuffer. I've primarily done small batches though.

Next purchase will probably be a pressure cooker.

And to chime in on the duck confit conversation, places like Whole Foods sell duck fat in containers.  However if you have the option of just buying a whole next time, do that instead. Then you get the breasts and all the additional fat you can render on your own.
 
2014-05-29 11:28:15 PM  

Trillian Astra: A half-way decent chef's knife, chopping boards, and a meat thermometer. I've got a pretty bare bones kitchen.

But I'm getting a new cast iron pan after we move.


I highly recommend you search craigslist or eBay for an older Wagner or Griswold cast iron skillet. They are generally classified as antiques. Make sure you get one stamped with "Erie" (if it's a Griswold), that it sits flat and has a patina from good seasoning and even cooking over many years.  The Lodge brand is crap compared to the older American made Griswolds and Wagners.
 
2014-05-29 11:29:12 PM  
Rubber baking spatula FOR ALL THE THINGS!!! It can scrape all of the egg off of the bottom of your egg skillet when you're making scrambled eggs. It'll scrape everything off of the bottom of your wok when you're making stir fry. It'll even scrape the sides of your bowl when you're *DING!* BAKING!

That's all I have really.
 
2014-05-29 11:39:05 PM  

sdd2000: For when my GF cooks:

[img.fark.net image 850x796]


She sounds hot.

bu dum ching.

but seriously...
 
2014-05-29 11:41:30 PM  

lumiere: Trillian Astra: A half-way decent chef's knife, chopping boards, and a meat thermometer. I've got a pretty bare bones kitchen.

But I'm getting a new cast iron pan after we move.

I highly recommend you search craigslist or eBay for an older Wagner or Griswold cast iron skillet. They are generally classified as antiques. Make sure you get one stamped with "Erie" (if it's a Griswold), that it sits flat and has a patina from good seasoning and even cooking over many years.  The Lodge brand is crap compared to the older American made Griswolds and Wagners.


Does that still hold true if they have been blasted back down to white because they were rusty when the picker found found them?
 
2014-05-29 11:42:37 PM  

KeelingLovesCornholes: My Kitchen Aid stand mixer, biatches.


you gotta have a kitchen tractor
 
2014-05-30 12:16:04 AM  
Love my Stormtrooper spatula, the OXO Good Grips scrubbing brush with the base that catches drips is used throughout the day too.
c2.staticflickr.com
 
2014-05-30 12:17:16 AM  

thisisarepeat: lumiere: Trillian Astra: A half-way decent chef's knife, chopping boards, and a meat thermometer. I've got a pretty bare bones kitchen.

But I'm getting a new cast iron pan after we move.

I highly recommend you search craigslist or eBay for an older Wagner or Griswold cast iron skillet. They are generally classified as antiques. Make sure you get one stamped with "Erie" (if it's a Griswold), that it sits flat and has a patina from good seasoning and even cooking over many years.  The Lodge brand is crap compared to the older American made Griswolds and Wagners.

Does that still hold true if they have been blasted back down to white because they were rusty when the picker found found them?


Yes, just re-season them.  It'll take a bit of work, but worth it.
 
2014-05-30 12:17:41 AM  
Here's my list. I'll try not to repeat what every one else has mentioned previously, unless they are truly essential in my kitchen.

- Vitamix Blender (worth every dollar and it was purchased with a ten year warranty)
- SEB Pressure Cooker (old French model circa 1980s, gift from my mom)
- Le Creuset set of enameled cast iron pots and pans (I think I have over 7 in various sizes and colors, including a Le Creuset tagine (for North African food and most Eastern European/ Russian and uzbek stews)
- Steamer for couscous
- Wine opener (it was a gift)

Things I regret buying:
- Sous Vide (expensive and not used as much as I'd like)

The next thing I plan on buying:
- KitchenAid Stand Mixer
- LEM Sausage stuffer so I can make homemade Algerian merguez...

cdn.theatlantic.com
 
2014-05-30 12:20:19 AM  

rohar: thisisarepeat: lumiere: Trillian Astra: A half-way decent chef's knife, chopping boards, and a meat thermometer. I've got a pretty bare bones kitchen.

But I'm getting a new cast iron pan after we move.

I highly recommend you search craigslist or eBay for an older Wagner or Griswold cast iron skillet. They are generally classified as antiques. Make sure you get one stamped with "Erie" (if it's a Griswold), that it sits flat and has a patina from good seasoning and even cooking over many years.  The Lodge brand is crap compared to the older American made Griswolds and Wagners.

Does that still hold true if they have been blasted back down to white because they were rusty when the picker found found them?

Yes, just re-season them.  It'll take a bit of work, but worth it.


Yep, I second what rohar said. Unless the cast iron skillet is warped, has a hairline crack or has crusts of burned food on the interior, it can be used for decades on end. Make sure you are seasoning it correctly and you'll be fine.
 
2014-05-30 12:31:04 AM  

lumiere: Here's my list. I'll try not to repeat what every one else has mentioned previously, unless they are truly essential in my kitchen.

- Vitamix Blender (worth every dollar and it was purchased with a ten year warranty)
- SEB Pressure Cooker (old French model circa 1980s, gift from my mom)
- Le Creuset set of enameled cast iron pots and pans (I think I have over 7 in various sizes and colors, including a Le Creuset tagine (for North African food and most Eastern European/ Russian and uzbek stews)
- Steamer for couscous
- Wine opener (it was a gift)

Things I regret buying:
- Sous Vide (expensive and not used as much as I'd like)

The next thing I plan on buying:
- KitchenAid Stand Mixer
- LEM Sausage stuffer so I can make homemade Algerian merguez...

[cdn.theatlantic.com image 450x300]


I know, I'm gonna piss off a bunch of foodies, but skip the LEM.  I own one and refuse to use it anymore.  This is gonna sound odd as all hell, but go to Harbor Freight.  http://www.harborfreight.com/http-www-harborfreight-com-electric-meat - grinder-99598-html.html

Tough as nails, works well if you can spin the links fast enough, and if (I haven't in over 300lbs of meat) you burn it out, it's only $50.
 
2014-05-30 12:59:07 AM  

rohar: thisisarepeat: lumiere: Trillian Astra: A half-way decent chef's knife, chopping boards, and a meat thermometer. I've got a pretty bare bones kitchen.

But I'm getting a new cast iron pan after we move.

I highly recommend you search craigslist or eBay for an older Wagner or Griswold cast iron skillet. They are generally classified as antiques. Make sure you get one stamped with "Erie" (if it's a Griswold), that it sits flat and has a patina from good seasoning and even cooking over many years.  The Lodge brand is crap compared to the older American made Griswolds and Wagners.

Does that still hold true if they have been blasted back down to white because they were rusty when the picker found found them?

Yes, just re-season them.  It'll take a bit of work, but worth it.


cool, thanks.
 
2014-05-30 01:23:50 AM  

acohn: [img.fark.net image 425x363]

/Can't believe I'm the first with this.


Oh hell yes.

In my set of kitchen supplies, I also have a bunch of non-stick cooking spoons. I use them for stirring the French Press, and then later scooping out the spent grounds. They do the job perfectly, and I don't have to worry about scratching the glass. As functional spoons, they don't work so well.
 
2014-05-30 01:52:35 AM  
Rotisserie convection toaster oven. Makes awesome Easter duck.
Immersion blender. Second best red gravy of my life.
Mesh colander. Takes the fat out of ground anything.
Flex chop mats. Why not more pop?
Rum. Makes everything better and yummier. Red wine works good in the food; though.
And another word: bolline. I bought it for me; he uses it for himself. Toodles!
 
2014-05-30 01:59:37 AM  
Cant believe this wasn't mentioned...


img0.etsystatic.com


Friggin thing is awesome - a workhorse i have been using for 25+ years


/hot like a brat
 
2014-05-30 02:07:09 AM  
Cutting boards. (I eat a lot of chopped vegetable salads.) Small strainers to catch the seeds when I squeeze lemon juice over said salads.

Flexible scraper, for making scrambled eggs and for scraping (duh) bowls when I bake.

Funnels. Seriously. I picked up a set of two funnels, one small and one large, at IKEA a while back for about $1. I use them all the time to fill water bottles, sugar jars, etc. The other day I was going to make chicken cutlets and realized I didn't have flour. Put the oil back in the bottle using a funnel - easy as pie. I highly recommend having a couple on hand.

Maybe not really a kitchen utensil, but those bag clips get a good workout in my kitchen, even though I keep most stuff in mason or canning jars.

Are grinder for rock salt and pepper considered kitchen utensils? They get heavy use, as well.
 
2014-05-30 02:12:58 AM  
Oh, I forgot - my egg slicer.
 
2014-05-30 02:36:30 AM  

rohar: lumiere: Here's my list. I'll try not to repeat what every one else has mentioned previously, unless they are truly essential in my kitchen.

- Vitamix Blender (worth every dollar and it was purchased with a ten year warranty)
- SEB Pressure Cooker (old French model circa 1980s, gift from my mom)
- Le Creuset set of enameled cast iron pots and pans (I think I have over 7 in various sizes and colors, including a Le Creuset tagine (for North African food and most Eastern European/ Russian and uzbek stews)
- Steamer for couscous
- Wine opener (it was a gift)

Things I regret buying:
- Sous Vide (expensive and not used as much as I'd like)

The next thing I plan on buying:
- KitchenAid Stand Mixer
- LEM Sausage stuffer so I can make homemade Algerian merguez...

[cdn.theatlantic.com image 450x300]

I know, I'm gonna piss off a bunch of foodies, but skip the LEM.  I own one and refuse to use it anymore.  This is gonna sound odd as all hell, but go to Harbor Freight.  http://www.harborfreight.com/http-www-harborfreight-com-electric-meat - grinder-99598-html.html

Tough as nails, works well if you can spin the links fast enough, and if (I haven't in over 300lbs of meat) you burn it out, it's only $50.


Thank you, rohar! Piss off all the foodies you have to, sometimes kitchen gadgets don't have to be super expensive to be practical.

I'm not a huge fan of Harbor Freight because a lot if their stuff is crap but I do have one close by so I'll look into the meat grinder. Just one quick question, would I need to buy anything else to "stuff my own sausage/merguez"?
 
2014-05-30 02:53:50 AM  
Spice grinder. Holy shiat there's nothing better than fresh ground pepper.

I have two of them, one is a big heavy glass & bullet-proof plastic hourglass-shaped one, which is built to take LOTS of abuse...and then there's this dainty little butt-kicker that fits my small paws perfectly.

I found it in a local gourmet shop, used up the contents, and saved the grinder-top bottle.

www.italiangourmetonline.com

/hawt hawt hawt linked
 
2014-05-30 03:05:21 AM  
Those grinders have ceramic elements inside, I might add.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-05-30 06:36:16 AM  

amyldoanitrite: DGS: flucto: big-ass enameled cast iron pots with lids

We recently got an enameled cast-iron dutch oven. 5 qt I think. It's fantastic.. finally wifey can make plov. And I did duck legs for the first time. Being able to cook and then transition a pot straight to the oven is sweet.

Ok, I know I'm really late to the thread, but can you please post your plov recipe? We had an exchange student from Turkmenistan a few years ago, and I could never find a plov recipe that turned out right.

He said my somsas and manti were delicious, though.


I'll get it from her and either post it or send it to you. I thought it would have more spicing to it but it's pretty minimal. Then again, wifey can't handle spicy anything and tends to go minimal, so you'll probably end up changing it up a little as is suitable for your tastes. Generally speaking, though, it's 1-2 lbs of lamb shoulder with the bone in (the marrow is kind of important for flavor), a lb of carrots shredded, 2 large onions roughly diced, oil, rice, salt and pepper. It's the oil and rice I can't quantify at the moment.

i.imgur.com
 
2014-05-30 06:40:36 AM  

lumiere: - LEM Sausage stuffer so I can make homemade Algerian merguez...


When you get that and want help with sources and techniques I will probably be sleeping but I'll try.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-05-30 07:12:59 AM  

DGS: amyldoanitrite: DGS: flucto: big-ass enameled cast iron pots with lids

We recently got an enameled cast-iron dutch oven. 5 qt I think. It's fantastic.. finally wifey can make plov. And I did duck legs for the first time. Being able to cook and then transition a pot straight to the oven is sweet.

Ok, I know I'm really late to the thread, but can you please post your plov recipe? We had an exchange student from Turkmenistan a few years ago, and I could never find a plov recipe that turned out right.

He said my somsas and manti were delicious, though.

I'll get it from her and either post it or send it to you. I thought it would have more spicing to it but it's pretty minimal. Then again, wifey can't handle spicy anything and tends to go minimal, so you'll probably end up changing it up a little as is suitable for your tastes. Generally speaking, though, it's 1-2 lbs of lamb shoulder with the bone in (the marrow is kind of important for flavor), a lb of carrots shredded, 2 large onions roughly diced, oil, rice, salt and pepper. It's the oil and rice I can't quantify at the moment.

[i.imgur.com image 450x600]


Oh, and how did I forget this: a whole bulb of garlic.

So, basically, oil in the pan/pot, meat goes in to cook it so it browns a little bit, then add in your carrots and onion. Salt and pepper it, then stir to mix well. Once the onion starts to soften throw in the garlic and the rice, cover with a heavy lid so the rice can steam up while everything cooks in together.

This was me mostly watching.Later today I'll try to get the actual quantities.
 
2014-05-30 08:06:51 AM  
Aside from knives an cooking vessels?
Stainless steel mixing bowls and whisks.
Colander.
Gas flame.
Maple cutting boards.
And something from spatula city..
 
kth
2014-05-30 08:36:24 AM  

lumiere: Trillian Astra: A half-way decent chef's knife, chopping boards, and a meat thermometer. I've got a pretty bare bones kitchen.

But I'm getting a new cast iron pan after we move.

I highly recommend you search craigslist or eBay for an older Wagner or Griswold cast iron skillet. They are generally classified as antiques. Make sure you get one stamped with "Erie" (if it's a Griswold), that it sits flat and has a patina from good seasoning and even cooking over many years.  The Lodge brand is crap compared to the older American made Griswolds and Wagners.


Our local junk shop has two griswold mini casseroles. For $75. Each. That seems excessive.  I'm all for good stuff, but I thought it was an error when I first coveted them.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-05-30 08:44:56 AM  

lumiere: Here's my list. I'll try not to repeat what every one else has mentioned previously, unless they are truly essential in my kitchen.

- Le Creuset set of enameled cast iron pots and pans (I think I have over 7 in various sizes and colors, including a Le Creuset tagine (for North African food and most Eastern European/ Russian and uzbek stews)
- Steamer for couscous


We have an Oster steamer and it's worked great for us. Set the rice and ignore it while doing the rest of the work. Smooth and simple.

I'd love le creuset. Just costly as hell. We ended up picking up a Cuisinart 5qt enameled dutch oven and it has proven to be great so far. I can't really compare due to lack of experience with both but I can't much complain about what we have. Huge success for us (including the aforementioned plov, fitting right into your eastern European comment).
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-05-30 08:53:26 AM  

AllUpInYa: nickel-coated cast iron skillet (bullet-proof cast iron cooking without the headaches)


My eyebrows shot up at this one. Wifey has a strong nickel allergy (can't wear a lot of silver because of it, etc), so I can't help but think of just how bad this could be for us if any of that leeches out like normal cast-iron. I hope it's sealed, I've never heard of nickel-coated cast iron prior to this.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-05-30 08:58:06 AM  

sleeps in trees: flucto: DGS: We recently got an enameled cast-iron dutch oven. 5 qt I think. It's fantastic.. finally wifey can make plov. And I did duck legs for the first time. Being able to cook and then transition a pot straight to the oven is sweet.

Yeah, totally. I roast meat in them, make Bolognese, fry chickens, etc etc. indispensable IMO.

Off topic, my husband bought duck legs and I've never made them before.  Any tips?


Did you see my mail?
 
2014-05-30 09:10:29 AM  

lumiere: rohar: lumiere: Here's my list. I'll try not to repeat what every one else has mentioned previously, unless they are truly essential in my kitchen.

- Vitamix Blender (worth every dollar and it was purchased with a ten year warranty)
- SEB Pressure Cooker (old French model circa 1980s, gift from my mom)
- Le Creuset set of enameled cast iron pots and pans (I think I have over 7 in various sizes and colors, including a Le Creuset tagine (for North African food and most Eastern European/ Russian and uzbek stews)
- Steamer for couscous
- Wine opener (it was a gift)

Things I regret buying:
- Sous Vide (expensive and not used as much as I'd like)

The next thing I plan on buying:
- KitchenAid Stand Mixer
- LEM Sausage stuffer so I can make homemade Algerian merguez...

[cdn.theatlantic.com image 450x300]

I know, I'm gonna piss off a bunch of foodies, but skip the LEM.  I own one and refuse to use it anymore.  This is gonna sound odd as all hell, but go to Harbor Freight.  http://www.harborfreight.com/http-www-harborfreight-com-electric-meat - grinder-99598-html.html

Tough as nails, works well if you can spin the links fast enough, and if (I haven't in over 300lbs of meat) you burn it out, it's only $50.

Thank you, rohar! Piss off all the foodies you have to, sometimes kitchen gadgets don't have to be super expensive to be practical.

I'm not a huge fan of Harbor Freight because a lot if their stuff is crap but I do have one close by so I'll look into the meat grinder. Just one quick question, would I need to buy anything else to "stuff my own sausage/merguez"?


Casings.  That's it.  Works better if the meat is a bit on the cold side.  That's pretty normal for most meat grinders  Not frozen, but close seems perfect.

I'm not a huge fan of Harbor Freight either, but they've got a couple of products right.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-05-30 09:12:47 AM  

rohar: I'm not a huge fan of Harbor Freight either, but they've got a couple of products right.


Other than the meat grinder, what are some of the other products you feel are done well? Or did I miss that?
 
2014-05-30 09:19:03 AM  

DGS: rohar: I'm not a huge fan of Harbor Freight either, but they've got a couple of products right.

Other than the meat grinder, what are some of the other products you feel are done well? Or did I miss that?


They're not food related so I left them out :)

Wait, maybe HVLP paint sprayers could be used in the kitchen...
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-05-30 09:22:18 AM  

rohar: DGS: rohar: I'm not a huge fan of Harbor Freight either, but they've got a couple of products right.

Other than the meat grinder, what are some of the other products you feel are done well? Or did I miss that?

They're not food related so I left them out :)

Wait, maybe HVLP paint sprayers could be used in the kitchen...


Oh, gotcha.

/and maybe to spray moisture onto ribs in the smoker?
 
2014-05-30 09:34:16 AM  

SFSailor: catmandu: The meat grinder is wonderful, though!

I thought so, too... then I got an *actual* meat grinder and will *never* go back.  The KA attachments are now in the basement, pending a trip to Goodwill or similar.

If you grind meats regularly, get a real grinder.  A real one doesn't heat up and break the fat with extended use (the one I have actually gets *colder* the longer you use it), and is way faster / lower effort (and not awkwardly up in the air, if you're on the shorter side and the KA is on the counter).  Fundamentally, the lack of a cooling fan on the KA is, to my mind, a fatal design flaw.


Good point. I don't grind my own meats very often, just for a couple of recipes and when I make cannibal sandwiches. The attachment was a freebie when I bought my mixer (I got a special 75th anniversary one back in the 90's which was a special price, 2 free attachments, and a second bowl with my name engraved on it). That second bowl is the best "extra" you can get with a mixer. I have several cake recipes that require the egg whites be beaten separately and it is great to just pop one bowl on, beat, set aside and mix the rest of the batter in the other bowl. Also, when doing lots of baking, like at the holidays, I can mix dough for one batch and let it chill while still having a second bowl for another batch. Saves time when you don't have to transfer to something else, then wash the bowl.

I have dibs on my Mom's hand cranked meat grinder when she passes away. It has served her well for the last 65+ years (since her marriage to Dad) and I expect it to serve me well too.
 
2014-05-30 09:35:52 AM  
fbspc.com

Took years for me to get one of these, couldn't live without it now.  No pre-heating and doesn't heat up the house in warmer weather.
 
2014-05-30 09:41:05 AM  

DGS: amyldoanitrite: DGS: flucto: big-ass enameled cast iron pots with lids

We recently got an enameled cast-iron dutch oven. 5 qt I think. It's fantastic.. finally wifey can make plov. And I did duck legs for the first time. Being able to cook and then transition a pot straight to the oven is sweet.

Ok, I know I'm really late to the thread, but can you please post your plov recipe? We had an exchange student from Turkmenistan a few years ago, and I could never find a plov recipe that turned out right.

He said my somsas and manti were delicious, though.

I'll get it from her and either post it or send it to you. I thought it would have more spicing to it but it's pretty minimal. Then again, wifey can't handle spicy anything and tends to go minimal, so you'll probably end up changing it up a little as is suitable for your tastes. Generally speaking, though, it's 1-2 lbs of lamb shoulder with the bone in (the marrow is kind of important for flavor), a lb of carrots shredded, 2 large onions roughly diced, oil, rice, salt and pepper. It's the oil and rice I can't quantify at the moment.

[i.imgur.com image 450x600]


I went through a Russian phase and plov is one of my favorite dishes to make. My suggestions: add bay leaves, turmeric, coriander, cumin and paprika. Also, the carrots should be julienned. Natasha's kitchen has a good recipe for plov here.  Other Russian dishes I make regularly include Salad Olivieh (Russian potato salad on crack), and Chebureki (deep fried dumplings stuffed with beef or lamb). Feel free to email me if you want any of the recipes le ila ime @ gmail.com.

flucto: lumiere: - LEM Sausage stuffer so I can make homemade Algerian merguez...

When you get that and want help with sources and techniques I will probably be sleeping but I'll try.


Thanks! I'll take you up on that as soon as I head to Harbor Freight and pick one up. But it won't be anytime soon.

kth: lumiere: Trillian Astra: A half-way decent chef's knife, chopping boards, and a meat thermometer. I've got a pretty bare bones kitchen.

But I'm getting a new cast iron pan after we move.

I highly recommend you search craigslist or eBay for an older Wagner or Griswold cast iron skillet. They are generally classified as antiques. Make sure you get one stamped with "Erie" (if it's a Griswold), that it sits flat and has a patina from good seasoning and even cooking over many years.  The Lodge brand is crap compared to the older American made Griswolds and Wagners.

Our local junk shop has two griswold mini casseroles. For $75. Each. That seems excessive.  I'm all for good stuff, but I thought it was an error when I first coveted them.


75 bucks for a mini Griswold seems steep. You can find better deals if you aren't in a rush. I placed a bid on one on eBay (#9 Griswold Erie for $49). I got outbid but I'm not in a rush, they pop up all the time. Just don't settle.

DGS: lumiere: Here's my list. I'll try not to repeat what every one else has mentioned previously, unless they are truly essential in my kitchen.

- Le Creuset set of enameled cast iron pots and pans (I think I have over 7 in various sizes and colors, including a Le Creuset tagine (for North African food and most Eastern European/ Russian and uzbek stews)
- Steamer for couscous


We have an Oster steamer and it's worked great for us. Set the rice and ignore it while doing the rest of the work. Smooth and simple.

I'd love le creuset. Just costly as hell. We ended up picking up a Cuisinart 5qt enameled dutch oven and it has proven to be great so far. I can't really compare due to lack of experience with both but I can't much complain about what we have. Huge success for us (including the aforementioned plov, fitting right into your eastern European comment).


Le Creuset is super pricy but in all fairness, they last a lifetime and it's well worth the investment. I purchased several as a set from Sur La Table and if anything goes wrong with them, the company replaces them - no questions asked. I drunkenly dropped one and the handle cracked, within two weeks they sent me a replacement.

I should specify, the 'steamers' I have are pictured below. They are more like a basket. You put the couscous in it over a pot of boiling water. Perhaps steamer isn't the correct word but I wasn't sure how to translate 'couscousiere':

i.imgur.com
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-05-30 09:47:00 AM  

lumiere: I went through a Russian phase and plov is one of my favorite dishes to make. My suggestions: add bay leaves, turmeric, coriander, cumin and paprika. Also, the carrots should be julienned. Natasha's kitchen has a good recipe for plov here. Other Russian dishes I make regularly include Salad Olivieh (Russian potato salad on crack), and Chebureki (deep fried dumplings stuffed with beef or lamb). Feel free to email me if you want any of the recipes le ila ime @ gmail.com.


Thanks for the offer, I'm all for recipes. Being married to a Russian, though, I know better than to try and change her recipes without a good discussion. This is her childhood, heh. And Babushka is very particular about how her recipes get used. She asks about them anytime she hears we made something. :D I do know I'd like to punch up the plov some but.. well.. wish me luck on that. It still tastes quite good so I can't complain.

Olivie is a staple and there's not a New Years (let alone most other family gatherings) where this doesn't have a prominent spot on the table. I've come to enjoy vinaigrette as a very light, refreshing salad without all the mayo or sour cream. We've got the tools to make our own pelmeni and vareniki but wifey's been a bit lax on that. She swears she'll do it but.. heh.. we'll see.
 
2014-05-30 09:51:49 AM  
essential tools:

www.ikea.com


cast iron skillet
wok
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-05-30 09:59:55 AM  

lumiere: DGS: amyldoanitrite: DGS: flucto: big-ass enameled cast iron pots with lids

We recently got an enameled cast-iron dutch oven. 5 qt I think. It's fantastic.. finally wifey can make plov. And I did duck legs for the first time. Being able to cook and then transition a pot straight to the oven is sweet.

Ok, I know I'm really late to the thread, but can you please post your plov recipe? We had an exchange student from Turkmenistan a few years ago, and I could never find a plov recipe that turned out right.

He said my somsas and manti were delicious, though.

I'll get it from her and either post it or send it to you. I thought it would have more spicing to it but it's pretty minimal. Then again, wifey can't handle spicy anything and tends to go minimal, so you'll probably end up changing it up a little as is suitable for your tastes. Generally speaking, though, it's 1-2 lbs of lamb shoulder with the bone in (the marrow is kind of important for flavor), a lb of carrots shredded, 2 large onions roughly diced, oil, rice, salt and pepper. It's the oil and rice I can't quantify at the moment.

[i.imgur.com image 450x600]


I went through a Russian phase and plov is one of my favorite dishes to make. My suggestions: add bay leaves, turmeric, coriander, cumin and paprika. Also, the carrots should be julienned. Natasha's kitchen has a good recipe for plov here.


Also - I went and read that recipe. Good stuff, and reminds me that yes, she'd boiled water in a kettle and added it after adding the rice. I really should've written all this down, but this seems like a good recipe if you want to go with beef. I still think missing out on the flavor from the bone is taking away from it even with the other spices added that I didn't mention.
 
2014-05-30 10:00:21 AM  

lumiere: DGS: amyldoanitrite: DGS: flucto:
*snip*

I should specify, the 'steamers' I have are pictured below. They are more like a basket. You put the couscous in it over a pot of boiling water. Perhaps steamer isn't the correct word but I wasn't sure how to translate 'couscousiere':


Want! Those look like the perfect baskets to raise my bread in!
 
2014-05-30 10:02:04 AM  

DGS: lumiere: I went through a Russian phase and plov is one of my favorite dishes to make. My suggestions: add bay leaves, turmeric, coriander, cumin and paprika. Also, the carrots should be julienned. Natasha's kitchen has a good recipe for plov here. Other Russian dishes I make regularly include Salad Olivieh (Russian potato salad on crack), and Chebureki (deep fried dumplings stuffed with beef or lamb). Feel free to email me if you want any of the recipes le ila ime @ gmail.com.

Thanks for the offer, I'm all for recipes. Being married to a Russian, though, I know better than to try and change her recipes without a good discussion. This is her childhood, heh. And Babushka is very particular about how her recipes get used. She asks about them anytime she hears we made something. :D I do know I'd like to punch up the plov some but.. well.. wish me luck on that. It still tastes quite good so I can't complain.

Olivie is a staple and there's not a New Years (let alone most other family gatherings) where this doesn't have a prominent spot on the table. I've come to enjoy vinaigrette as a very light, refreshing salad without all the mayo or sour cream. We've got the tools to make our own pelmeni and vareniki but wifey's been a bit lax on that. She swears she'll do it but.. heh.. we'll see.


Da, don't ever mess with the Ruskies when it comes to cooking and trying to alter their recipes. If you and your SO are ever in Austin, Texas, a friend of mine,  Varda Tamoulianis, owns the only Russian restaurant here, Russian House NaZdorovye. They cook a mean Pelmeni and their Manti is great too.  You can tell her the Algerian sent you. ;)

Priyatnogo appetita!
 
2014-05-30 10:19:32 AM  

DGS: rohar: DGS: rohar: I'm not a huge fan of Harbor Freight either, but they've got a couple of products right.

Other than the meat grinder, what are some of the other products you feel are done well? Or did I miss that?

They're not food related so I left them out :)

Wait, maybe HVLP paint sprayers could be used in the kitchen...

Oh, gotcha.

/and maybe to spray moisture onto ribs in the smoker?


I suppose one of these:

http://www.harborfreight.com/3-cfm-two-stage-vacuum-pump-60805.html

could be useful if you were looking to do a massive sous vide.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-05-30 10:24:19 AM  

lumiere: Da, don't ever mess with the Ruskies when it comes to cooking and trying to alter their recipes. If you and your SO are ever in Austin, Texas, a friend of mine, Varda Tamoulianis, owns the only Russian restaurant here, Russian House NaZdorovye. They cook a mean Pelmeni and their Manti is great too. You can tell her the Algerian sent you. ;)

Priyatnogo appetita!


Hah, На Здoровье :D Excellent. Thanks for the tip.. we actually live in a -very- heavily Russian neighborhood. But I'll certainly keep that in mind should we head that way.
 
2014-05-30 11:39:55 AM  

DGS: lumiere: DGS: amyldoanitrite: DGS: flucto: big-ass enameled cast iron pots with lids

We recently got an enameled cast-iron dutch oven. 5 qt I think. It's fantastic.. finally wifey can make plov. And I did duck legs for the first time. Being able to cook and then transition a pot straight to the oven is sweet.

Ok, I know I'm really late to the thread, but can you please post your plov recipe? We had an exchange student from Turkmenistan a few years ago, and I could never find a plov recipe that turned out right.

He said my somsas and manti were delicious, though.

I'll get it from her and either post it or send it to you. I thought it would have more spicing to it but it's pretty minimal. Then again, wifey can't handle spicy anything and tends to go minimal, so you'll probably end up changing it up a little as is suitable for your tastes. Generally speaking, though, it's 1-2 lbs of lamb shoulder with the bone in (the marrow is kind of important for flavor), a lb of carrots shredded, 2 large onions roughly diced, oil, rice, salt and pepper. It's the oil and rice I can't quantify at the moment.

[i.imgur.com image 450x600]


I went through a Russian phase and plov is one of my favorite dishes to make. My suggestions: add bay leaves, turmeric, coriander, cumin and paprika. Also, the carrots should be julienned. Natasha's kitchen has a good recipe for plov here.

Also - I went and read that recipe. Good stuff, and reminds me that yes, she'd boiled water in a kettle and added it after adding the rice. I really should've written all this down, but this seems like a good recipe if you want to go with beef. I still think missing out on the flavor from the bone is taking away from it even with the other spices added that I didn't mention.


This is definitely saved.  I can see it being a regular dish in the rotation at home.

Since we're allowing cooking vessels now, I'll mention my can't-live-withouts:

Cast iron anything-skillet (which sees more action outside on the grill than on the stovetop), wok, enameled Dutch oven
Stock pots: 12 and 20 quart.  I'll fill the large one when it comes time to make chili, I am incapable of doing that one small
Calphalon nonstick 12" pan.  Anything involving eggs happens here, and I can get nice wide thin omelettes out of it
Cheap steel wok  When SFR (StirFried Random) is happening in the cast iron, I'll have the fried rice going here
Stainless 1.5 qt. Windsor pan.  Most sauces are built here, or as pan sauces in the cast iron
Crock pots.  I have four different sizes and use at least one of them every week.  The problem with that is when you're working from home you have to smell it all day

I have been lucky enough to get most of my otherwise-expensive Calphalon open stock from yard sales, thrift shops, other places where they didn't know what they had.  I'd have paid well north of a couple thousand if I had bought any of this new.

/Now don't get me started on knives.
 
2014-05-30 11:43:44 AM  
since this has turned into a cooking vessel and appliance thread now too...

for the folks who love Le Creuset but don't love the price, I have never failed to find their stuff deep discounted and unflawed at Marshall's.
 
2014-05-30 12:44:53 PM  

stonelotus: since this has turned into a cooking vessel and appliance thread now too...

for the folks who love Le Creuset but don't love the price, I have never failed to find their stuff deep discounted and unflawed at Marshall's.


Seconded.  Also their sister company TJ Maxx.  Usually half price (which can still be pricey)
 
2014-05-30 12:49:12 PM  
Farm auctions, garage sales and, to a lesser extent, estate sales are great places to pick up cast iron.  Just don't buy the Wagnerware in Shelby County, Ohio because you'll pay a premium because someone's Grampa or Uncle worked there.  15 miles south and the price gets cut in half.
 
2014-05-30 12:52:14 PM  

lumiere: I'm not a huge fan of Harbor Freight because a lot if their stuff is crap but I do have one close by so I'll look into the meat grinder. Just one quick question, would I need to buy anything else to "stuff my own sausage/merguez"?


HF has a lot of crap, a lot of "if you only need a tool once or twice," and, shockingly, some really nice stuff at great prices.  But they often have the crap right next to the nice stuff -- for example, their *good* tool chests are an incredible deal, but the cheaper ones are borderline junk.  So far, the grinder has fallen in the "actually shockingly good and cheap" category.  And, as previously mentioned, if I do manage to kill it, it's only $50, where straining the KA can lead to a much more expensive failure.

Also, consider getting _Charcuterie_ by Ruhlman.  *I* think it is a particularly well written cookbook, and it does a wonderful job of explaining the processes, hazards, tradeoffs, pitfalls, benefits, etc of all kinds of cool meat processing; others, of course, may disagree.  There are many other good books on sausage making, too.

rohar: I know, I'm gonna piss off a bunch of foodies, but skip the LEM.  I refuse to use it anymore.


Elaborate, if you care to, or go off on a good rant, if you'd like.  I'm curious about why you hate it.

In my case I got the LEM, realized, yet again... I am slow, how much better purpose-built tools are, then got the HF grinder.  Why do you hate the LEM?  I like it 'cuz it's -silent-... not sure, even if it's easier, I want any more of the machinery howling than I absolutely need....

/ I remain perplexed by the adoration for garlic presses... smash, mince, done!
 
2014-05-30 01:03:02 PM  

lumiere: Trillian Astra: A half-way decent chef's knife, chopping boards, and a meat thermometer. I've got a pretty bare bones kitchen.

But I'm getting a new cast iron pan after we move.

I highly recommend you search craigslist or eBay for an older Wagner or Griswold cast iron skillet. They are generally classified as antiques. Make sure you get one stamped with "Erie" (if it's a Griswold), that it sits flat and has a patina from good seasoning and even cooking over many years.  The Lodge brand is crap compared to the older American made Griswolds and Wagners.


CSB:  when my sibs and I were clearing out my parents' house, we divvied everything up.  The one thing we argued about?  The expensive china?  All of the sterling silver?.  The Revere ware?  (No, not Revere-ware, actual silverware made by Paul himself). None of those.  It was the stack of Griswold cast iron pans.  Lots of horse trading went on.  We ended up with a chicken fryer and a handful of smaller frypans.  They had been my mom's grandmother's and they'll still be working fine for our grandchildren.
 
2014-05-30 01:27:04 PM  
courantblogs.com

I use the hell out of my immersion blender. Usually for split pea, tomato, or squash soup.
 
2014-05-30 01:30:28 PM  

SFSailor: Elaborate, if you care to, or go off on a good rant, if you'd like. I'm curious about why you hate it.


Honestly, it just seems to be one more implement in the process.  If I get way out of control and start working with more textured product, sure, but if I'm just making about 100 Italian sausages, I've got to grind them anyway, may as well hook up the casing stuffer to the grinder and reduce the cleanup by 50%.

For Andouille, it's hard to compete with the LEM.

Agreed on the garlic front, learn some knife skills and put the garlic press away.
 
2014-05-30 02:17:23 PM  

filetofish bigmac quarter pounder with cheese: Love my Stormtrooper spatula, the OXO Good Grips scrubbing brush with the base that catches drips is used throughout the day too.
[c2.staticflickr.com image 640x427]


I used to have one, then I got laid.
 
2014-05-30 02:23:20 PM  

tekgeek73: filetofish bigmac quarter pounder with cheese: Love my Stormtrooper spatula, the OXO Good Grips scrubbing brush with the base that catches drips is used throughout the day too.
[c2.staticflickr.com image 640x427]

I used to have one, then I got laid.



Ah, the old Aunt Jemima treatment.
 
kth
2014-05-30 02:25:53 PM  

Anderson's Pooper: Farm auctions, garage sales and, to a lesser extent, estate sales are great places to pick up cast iron.  Just don't buy the Wagnerware in Shelby County, Ohio because you'll pay a premium because someone's Grampa or Uncle worked there.  15 miles south and the price gets cut in half.


Estate and farm auctions are awesome. The difference between garage sales and estate sales is that at a garage sale, you're buying what other people don't want. At an estate sale, you're buying what the children already have. Better stuff.

I adore farm auctions. Two weekends ago we got a table saw, mitre saw, lug wrench, chair and drafting table for $72. My husband was off getting the truck while I was bidding on the saw, and all the old farmers were giving me advice.
 
2014-05-30 02:37:45 PM  

rohar: Honestly, it just seems to be one more implement in the process.


Fair enough.  Makes sense.  And it is a large, awkwardly shaped thing to have to store somewhere.  I just loathe how loud the grinder is (maybe quiet is a benefit available if ya' spend more than $50?  hmm).

I can see just getting the HF grinder and being done with it, if it does a nice job stuffing and you're not making more than 5 pounds at a time.  I don't mind that I bought the LEM, but now I'm wondering if I really needed to.  Hmm.  Definitely gonna have to try stuffing with the HF next time... one less thing to clean is -always- a plus.

kth: Two weekends ago we got a table saw, mitre saw, lug wrench, chair and drafting table for $72


Given these results, if there's more to finding good farm auctions than heading over to the ol' googles and punching in "farm auctions [state]", I'm sure I'm not the only one who would love some tips.

/ looking at all the love in this thread, I'm beginning to think the cast iron thing is an actual cult; it's an inferior choice for all but a few very specific tasks... or maybe I'm just not a good enough cook...
// but I'm -certain- that garlic presses are stupid
 
2014-05-30 02:48:39 PM  

SFSailor: I'm beginning to think the cast iron thing is an actual cult; it's an inferior choice for all but a few very specific tasks


I was indoctrinated by my grandmother.  And by "a few specific tasks" you mean anything that requires good constant heat control with fewer dips and spikes, and any high heat application like searing or *;proper* stir frying is best done in iron.
 
kth
2014-05-30 02:53:20 PM  

SFSailor: rohar: Honestly, it just seems to be one more implement in the process.

Fair enough.  Makes sense.  And it is a large, awkwardly shaped thing to have to store somewhere.  I just loathe how loud the grinder is (maybe quiet is a benefit available if ya' spend more than $50?  hmm).

I can see just getting the HF grinder and being done with it, if it does a nice job stuffing and you're not making more than 5 pounds at a time.  I don't mind that I bought the LEM, but now I'm wondering if I really needed to.  Hmm.  Definitely gonna have to try stuffing with the HF next time... one less thing to clean is -always- a plus.

kth: Two weekends ago we got a table saw, mitre saw, lug wrench, chair and drafting table for $72

Given these results, if there's more to finding good farm auctions than heading over to the ol' googles and punching in "farm auctions [state]", I'm sure I'm not the only one who would love some tips.

/ looking at all the love in this thread, I'm beginning to think the cast iron thing is an actual cult; it's an inferior choice for all but a few very specific tasks... or maybe I'm just not a good enough cook...
// but I'm -certain- that garlic presses are stupid


Location is key. Go where there are smallish farms. Find a small town in the area, go to the grocery store and pick up their weekly paper. Look for auctions. Marvel at the flowery language: "Willard and Mavis loved the lord and farming, now that Willard has been welcomed home, Mavis is moving to assisted care. In their 60 years of marriage, they have accumulated many lovely antiques." Bring cash for buying baked goods at the concession stand. Giggle as you bid against an old farmer who looks like James Woods researching a role.
 
2014-05-30 03:13:16 PM  

tekgeek73: filetofish bigmac quarter pounder with cheese: Love my Stormtrooper spatula, the OXO Good Grips scrubbing brush with the base that catches drips is used throughout the day too.
[c2.staticflickr.com image 640x427]

I used to have one, then I got laid.


I know, right?  Good one, you got me.  I will say that if you ever get beyond just getting laid, women love a man that can cook omelets for them in the morning.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-05-30 03:17:07 PM  

filetofish bigmac quarter pounder with cheese: women love a man that can cook omelets for them in the morning.


This.
 
2014-05-30 03:28:39 PM  

praxcelis: I was indoctrinated by my grandmother.  And by "a few specific tasks" you mean anything that requires good constant heat control with fewer dips and spikes, and any high heat application like searing or *;proper* stir frying is best done in iron.


Yeah, 'cuz it's impossible to get high heat or searing or consistent temps in a stainless pan, or on a grill.

< eye roll >

To each their own, and I am willing to bet there is a whole heap of "learn to use the seemingly-inferior tool the way it needs to be used" that I am missing, but the fragility, rusting, hot handle, heavy weight, slow-to-heat, slow-to-cool, and fussy-cleaning-depending-on-who-you-believe disadvantages all outweigh the "but my gramma gave 'em to me and I'm'a give 'em to my kids,"* and "I can use a fork without worrying about scratching it" ... to me.

(* And come to think of it, my 15+ y/o stainless pans look like new.  They'll live on after me, just like CI, but with fewer rust issues and "if you take a grinder to 'em, you can retreat them" caveats. ; ) )

But, like many things, I'm probably wildly misguided and uninformed.  Enjoy your pans, and may good foods come out of them.  For me, though, I'm packing mine in the basement until I see talented chefs (who aren't banging some flavor of "Americana!" drum for their schtick) start using them in actual restaurants at actual restaurant temps (further, I can help but notice that when using -actual- high heat, not "home kitchen 'high' heat" the pans ain't cast iron).  And even then, they'll probably stay in the basement... probably until they become something the next poor schlub who owns this place finds as a nice surprise.

kth: Location is key. Go where there are smallish farms. Find a small town in the area, go to the grocery store and pick up their weekly paper. Look for auctions. Marvel at the flowery language: "Willard and Mavis loved the lord and farming, now that Willard has been welcomed home, Mavis is moving to assisted care. In their 60 years of marriage, they have accumulated many lovely antiques." Bring cash for buying baked goods at the concession stand. Giggle as you bid against an old farmer who looks like James Woods researching a role.


This is such a lovely paragraph that I couldn't bring myself to shorten it.  It bears reading again, anyway.

Thanks for the tips / approach advice!  Might be time to take a weekend driving around rural VA/MD... I could use a table saw... and who knows what else....
 
2014-05-30 03:29:01 PM  

DGS: filetofish bigmac quarter pounder with cheese: women love a man that can cook omelets for them in the morning.

This.


Actually it was chicken piccata that made her first notice.  At the time it was the dish I always hauled out when things got to the "come to my place and I'll make dinner" phase.
 
2014-05-30 03:37:09 PM  
SFSailor:

Yeah, 'cuz it's impossible to get high heat or searing or consistent temps in a stainless pan, or on a grill.

Never said that.  If you have good quality stainless with a nice heavy base you can get good temperature control. 

To each their own, and I am willing to bet there is a whole heap of "learn to use the seemingly-inferior tool the way it needs to be used" that I am missing, but the fragility, rusting, hot handle, heavy weight, slow-to-heat, slow-to-cool, and fussy-cleaning-depending-on-who-you-believe disadvantages all outweigh the "but my gramma gave 'em to me and I'm'a give 'em to my kids,"* and "I can use a fork without worrying about scratching it" ... to me.

As you say, to each their own.  I've never noticed fragility, nor fussy cleaning.  If they're rusting that's a problem with care and storage, not use.  And unfortunately, I didn't inherit my grandmother's cast iron, my aunt made off with them (and her heavily-annotated cookbook, dammit)

(* And come to think of it, my 15+ y/o stainless pans look like new.  They'll live on after me, just like CI, but with fewer rust issues and "if you take a grinder to 'em, you can retreat them" caveats. ; ) )

... For me, though, I'm packing mine in the basement until I see talented chefs (who aren't banging some flavor of "Americana!" drum for their schtick) start using them in actual restaurants at actual restaurant temps ...


I'm sure any of us who love using cast iron would take them off your hands and make good use of them :)   You're right, line cooking is way different than home cooking and the implements vary accordingly.  I suspect that's why the pros who frequent the weekly FFT haven't weighed in--they're used to a different set of commercial tools which would be out of place in the typical home kitchen.  (although when I'm making pizza for my kids and their friends a standing Hobart would sure make things go more quickly...)

tl:dr--if it works for you and tasty food is the result, use the tools you like.  If not, don't. :)
 
2014-05-30 03:39:21 PM  

SFSailor: praxcelis: I was indoctrinated by my grandmother.  And by "a few specific tasks" you mean anything that requires good constant heat control with fewer dips and spikes, and any high heat application like searing or *;proper* stir frying is best done in iron.

Yeah, 'cuz it's impossible to get high heat or searing or consistent temps in a stainless pan, or on a grill.

< eye roll >

To each their own, and I am willing to bet there is a whole heap of "learn to use the seemingly-inferior tool the way it needs to be used" that I am missing, but the fragility, rusting, hot handle, heavy weight, slow-to-heat, slow-to-cool, and fussy-cleaning-depending-on-who-you-believe disadvantages all outweigh the "but my gramma gave 'em to me and I'm'a give 'em to my kids,"* and "I can use a fork without worrying about scratching it" ... to me.

(* And come to think of it, my 15+ y/o stainless pans look like new.  They'll live on after me, just like CI, but with fewer rust issues and "if you take a grinder to 'em, you can retreat them" caveats. ; ) )

But, like many things, I'm probably wildly misguided and uninformed.  Enjoy your pans, and may good foods come out of them.  For me, though, I'm packing mine in the basement until I see talented chefs (who aren't banging some flavor of "Americana!" drum for their schtick) start using them in actual restaurants at actual restaurant temps (further, I can help but notice that when using -actual- high heat, not "home kitchen 'high' heat" the pans ain't cast iron).  And even then, they'll probably stay in the basement... probably until they become something the next poor schlub who owns this place finds as a nice surprise.

kth: Location is key. Go where there are smallish farms. Find a small town in the area, go to the grocery store and pick up their weekly paper. Look for auctions. Marvel at the flowery language: "Willard and Mavis loved the lord and farming, now that Willard has been welcomed home, Mavis is moving to assisted care. In ...


at what point did you go pro here?
 
2014-05-30 03:44:53 PM  

SFSailor: flucto: I've been doing more or less that for decades and even when people ask me "omg how did you make this taste so good?" when I tell them they tell me I'm doing it wrong.

I've asked guests for their arrival time, mentioning that I have to get the steaks in the grill an hour or so ahead of time.  More than once I've heard a variation of, "I was really terrified of your steak.  An hour?  I expected to have to find fast food on the way home.  But this is fantastic!"

Also a nice addition to steaks?  Render some beef fat and keep it in the fridge, then melt a bit and pour over the steak before serving, instead of butter.  *boom* steakhouse steak quality.

peacheslatour: lol.  My hubby and I have the same deal- I cook he cleans up.

Unless he enjoys cleaning as much as you enjoy cooking, THIS IS NOT A DEAL.  I've seen more than one divorce bubble up fundamentally driven in large part by this "deal."  Cleaning farking sucks, especially if the "cook" "enjoys" USING EVERY DAMNED UTENSIL IN THE KITCHEN POINTLESSLY, THOUGHTLESSLY, AND INSENSITIVELY, CREATING WAY MORE MESS THAN NECESSARY.

"I cook, you clean" is the most self-serving, stupid "deal" one half can inflict on the couple, unless the interests are exactly opposite -- one hates cooking and loves cleaning, and 't'other hates cleaning and loves cooking... but that's rare.  Usually, one "loves" cooking, and the other is stuck with "I cooked -- you clean."  And that is flat out messed up bullshiat that will silently seethe and build contempt until one day *bam* done.

Pet peave.  Your husband won't tell you.  I just did.


So, then (hypothetically speaking) what happens when the (hypothetical) husband cooks all of the dinners weekend breakfasts AND does all of the dishes AND also helps out with other cleaning housework but his (hypothetical) wife complains to (hypothetical) friends that "he never helps out around the house" for years on end? Said (hypothetical) husband also takes care of all of the outdoor housework and all of the  bathroom cleaning because "Eww That's disgusting! Yuck!"
/'hypothetical' relationship has 'hypothetical' problems, heh
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-05-30 03:49:44 PM  

SharkaPult: SFSailor: flucto: I've been doing more or less that for decades and even when people ask me "omg how did you make this taste so good?" when I tell them they tell me I'm doing it wrong.

I've asked guests for their arrival time, mentioning that I have to get the steaks in the grill an hour or so ahead of time.  More than once I've heard a variation of, "I was really terrified of your steak.  An hour?  I expected to have to find fast food on the way home.  But this is fantastic!"

Also a nice addition to steaks?  Render some beef fat and keep it in the fridge, then melt a bit and pour over the steak before serving, instead of butter.  *boom* steakhouse steak quality.

peacheslatour: lol.  My hubby and I have the same deal- I cook he cleans up.

Unless he enjoys cleaning as much as you enjoy cooking, THIS IS NOT A DEAL.  I've seen more than one divorce bubble up fundamentally driven in large part by this "deal."  Cleaning farking sucks, especially if the "cook" "enjoys" USING EVERY DAMNED UTENSIL IN THE KITCHEN POINTLESSLY, THOUGHTLESSLY, AND INSENSITIVELY, CREATING WAY MORE MESS THAN NECESSARY.

"I cook, you clean" is the most self-serving, stupid "deal" one half can inflict on the couple, unless the interests are exactly opposite -- one hates cooking and loves cleaning, and 't'other hates cleaning and loves cooking... but that's rare.  Usually, one "loves" cooking, and the other is stuck with "I cooked -- you clean."  And that is flat out messed up bullshiat that will silently seethe and build contempt until one day *bam* done.

Pet peave.  Your husband won't tell you.  I just did.

So, then (hypothetically speaking) what happens when the (hypothetical) husband cooks all of the dinners weekend breakfasts AND does all of the dishes AND also helps out with other cleaning housework but his (hypothetical) wife complains to (hypothetical) friends that "he never helps out around the house" for years on end? Said (hypothetical) husband also takes care of all of the outdoor ...


*whistles innocently*
 
2014-05-30 04:06:14 PM  

SFSailor: praxcelis: I was indoctrinated by my grandmother.  And by "a few specific tasks" you mean anything that requires good constant heat control with fewer dips and spikes, and any high heat application like searing or *;proper* stir frying is best done in iron.

Yeah, 'cuz it's impossible to get high heat or searing or consistent temps in a stainless pan, or on a grill.

< eye roll >

To each their own, and I am willing to bet there is a whole heap of "learn to use the seemingly-inferior tool the way it needs to be used" that I am missing, but the fragility, rusting, hot handle, heavy weight, slow-to-heat, slow-to-cool, and fussy-cleaning-depending-on-who-you-believe disadvantages all outweigh the "but my gramma gave 'em to me and I'm'a give 'em to my kids,"* and "I can use a fork without worrying about scratching it" ... to me.

(* And come to think of it, my 15+ y/o stainless pans look like new.  They'll live on after me, just like CI, but with fewer rust issues and "if you take a grinder to 'em, you can retreat them" caveats. ; ) )

But, like many things, I'm probably wildly misguided and uninformed.  Enjoy your pans, and may good foods come out of them.  For me, though, I'm packing mine in the basement until I see talented chefs (who aren't banging some flavor of "Americana!" drum for their schtick) start using them in actual restaurants at actual restaurant temps (further, I can help but notice that when using -actual- high heat, not "home kitchen 'high' heat" the pans ain't cast iron).  And even then, they'll probably stay in the basement... probably until they become something the next poor schlub who owns this place finds as a nice surprise.

kth: Location is key. Go where there are smallish farms. Find a small town in the area, go to the grocery store and pick up their weekly paper. Look for auctions. Marvel at the flowery language: "Willard and Mavis loved the lord and farming, now that Willard has been welcomed home, Mavis is moving to assisted care. In ...


auctionzip.com will get you started.  Then make sure you pick up the fliers for the auctioneers upcoming events once you're there.  Also, it can become somewhat addicting.
 
2014-05-30 04:28:31 PM  

SharkaPult: So, then (hypothetically speaking) what happens when the (hypothetical) husband cooks all of the dinners weekend breakfasts AND does all of the dishes AND also helps out with other cleaning housework but his (hypothetical) wife complains to (hypothetical) friends that "he never helps out around the house" for years on end? Said (hypothetical) husband also takes care of all of the outdoor housework and all of the bathroom cleaning because "Eww That's disgusting! Yuck!"/'hypothetical' relationship has 'hypothetical' problems, heh


I can identify with this.  Turns out the SO makes bank and is a tiger in the sack.  Kinda makes the rest ok.  :)

/thank god THAT isn't hypothetical
 
2014-05-30 04:44:55 PM  

praxcelis: Yeah, 'cuz it's impossible to get high heat or searing or consistent temps in a stainless pan, or on a grill.

Never said that.  If you have good quality stainless with a nice heavy base you can get good temperature control.


Different products for different uses.  For me, stainless is about heat transfer, including being able to take something off heat pretty quickly.  The problem is when you first put a steak on most stainless, it cools off the stainless which then needs to reheat up.  Heavy cast iron holds heat better so the steak/cooking surface interface gets back up to Maillard temps a lot faster.  I use a big cast iron griddle on my grill and can get much more crust than I can just using the grill grates.  And holy smokes is that stuff tasty.
 
2014-05-30 05:16:23 PM  

DGS: Did you see my mail?


No did you send it to ultra fark or gmail? Both are irksomely blank.
 
2014-05-30 05:28:05 PM  

SharkaPult: SFSailor: flucto: I've been doing more or less that for decades and even when people ask me "omg how did you make this taste so good?" when I tell them they tell me I'm doing it wrong.

I've asked guests for their arrival time, mentioning that I have to get the steaks in the grill an hour or so ahead of time.  More than once I've heard a variation of, "I was really terrified of your steak.  An hour?  I expected to have to find fast food on the way home.  But this is fantastic!"

Also a nice addition to steaks?  Render some beef fat and keep it in the fridge, then melt a bit and pour over the steak before serving, instead of butter.  *boom* steakhouse steak quality.

peacheslatour: lol.  My hubby and I have the same deal- I cook he cleans up.

Unless he enjoys cleaning as much as you enjoy cooking, THIS IS NOT A DEAL.  I've seen more than one divorce bubble up fundamentally driven in large part by this "deal."  Cleaning farking sucks, especially if the "cook" "enjoys" USING EVERY DAMNED UTENSIL IN THE KITCHEN POINTLESSLY, THOUGHTLESSLY, AND INSENSITIVELY, CREATING WAY MORE MESS THAN NECESSARY.

"I cook, you clean" is the most self-serving, stupid "deal" one half can inflict on the couple, unless the interests are exactly opposite -- one hates cooking and loves cleaning, and 't'other hates cleaning and loves cooking... but that's rare.  Usually, one "loves" cooking, and the other is stuck with "I cooked -- you clean."  And that is flat out messed up bullshiat that will silently seethe and build contempt until one day *bam* done.

Pet peave.  Your husband won't tell you.  I just did.

So, then (hypothetically speaking) what happens when the (hypothetical) husband cooks all of the dinners weekend breakfasts AND does all of the dishes AND also helps out with other cleaning housework but his (hypothetical) wife complains to (hypothetical) friends that "he never helps out around the house" for years on end? Said (hypothetical) husband also takes care of all of the outdoor ...


Hypothetical couple needs counseling or simply reduce the headache for both of you and hire a cleaning service to come in once a week.

You probably aren't doing it "right", it's a problem we all fall into.
 
2014-05-30 06:08:18 PM  

praxcelis: PullItOut: [dyozopqfp8ikx.cloudfront.net image 372x361]Could not live without this.

Now you're just showing off :)

/We really need to get together and do another tasting menu...


It may take an effort to schedule (I'm getting a master's degree after work these days), but I'm in.  :)
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-05-30 06:46:33 PM  

flucto: DGS: Did you see my mail?

No did you send it to ultra fark or gmail? Both are irksomely blank.


Oh, sorry, no, sleeps in trees had asked for help and I'd sent an email. Just wanted to make certain it was received.
 
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