If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(io9)   Does a dilophosaurus fossil with impressions of feathers prove that the dinosaur had feathers or did it just accidentally sit on a bird?   (io9.com) divider line 23
    More: Interesting, dinosaurs, eggshells, feathers, fossils  
•       •       •

1732 clicks; posted to Geek » on 27 May 2014 at 10:26 PM (21 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



23 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-05-27 09:17:17 PM  
That was the one that ate Newman. It didn't have feathers.
 
2014-05-27 09:30:13 PM  
I am honestly curious why this is still not known. We know that birds and reptiles are closely related. We know birds evolved from dinosaurs. Is it that there is little evidence of feathers or are feathers hard to fossilize?
 
2014-05-27 09:53:20 PM  
It's just pinin' for the fjords
 
2014-05-27 10:31:03 PM  
Maybe it was having a down day and just wanted to feel pretty.
 
2014-05-27 10:52:39 PM  

4seasons85!: I am honestly curious why this is still not known. We know that birds and reptiles are closely related. We know birds evolved from dinosaurs. Is it that there is little evidence of feathers or are feathers hard to fossilize?


There is some evidence of feathers on theropods. However, feathers don't fossilize. The best you can get is imprints in the mud around a complete skeleton, the mud hardens with the imprints, and it doesn't erode in the intervening eons. So, we don't find them all the time.

Most paleontologists are on board with many theropod species having feathers.
 
2014-05-27 11:01:31 PM  
I read that as dildophosaurus, which is Greek for Your Mom on Saturday Night Lizard.
 
2014-05-27 11:01:55 PM  

cgraves67: 4seasons85!: I am honestly curious why this is still not known. We know that birds and reptiles are closely related. We know birds evolved from dinosaurs. Is it that there is little evidence of feathers or are feathers hard to fossilize?

There is some evidence of feathers on theropods. However, feathers don't fossilize. The best you can get is imprints in the mud around a complete skeleton, the mud hardens with the imprints, and it doesn't erode in the intervening eons. So, we don't find them all the time.

Most paleontologists are on board with many theropod species having feathers.


Makes one wonder what else we weren't seeing. Like maybe some Hadrosaurs had downy feathers?
 
2014-05-27 11:05:58 PM  

cgraves67: 4seasons85!: I am honestly curious why this is still not known. We know that birds and reptiles are closely related. We know birds evolved from dinosaurs. Is it that there is little evidence of feathers or are feathers hard to fossilize?

There is some evidence of feathers on theropods. However, feathers don't fossilize. The best you can get is imprints in the mud around a complete skeleton, the mud hardens with the imprints, and it doesn't erode in the intervening eons. So, we don't find them all the time.

Most paleontologists are on board with many theropod species having feathers.


www.wired.com
 
2014-05-28 12:11:08 AM  
Perhaps it was something it only wore for religious ceremonies. ;b
 
2014-05-28 01:06:44 AM  
whatever the Bible says, you heathens
 
2014-05-28 01:36:53 AM  
[whothefarkcares.jpg]
 
2014-05-28 04:41:49 AM  

cgraves67: 4seasons85!: I am honestly curious why this is still not known. We know that birds and reptiles are closely related. We know birds evolved from dinosaurs. Is it that there is little evidence of feathers or are feathers hard to fossilize?

There is some evidence of feathers on theropods. However, feathers don't fossilize. The best you can get is imprints in the mud around a complete skeleton, the mud hardens with the imprints, and it doesn't erode in the intervening eons. So, we don't find them all the time.

Most paleontologists are on board with many theropod species having feathers.


Is it many theropods or primarily the Dromaeosaurid group?  I've read some interesting controversy about bird evolution suggesting that, while birds certainly evolved out of a dinosaur group, Dromaeosaurs might actually be an early branch off of the bird group that lost flight ability.

It's probably BS, but then so many paleontological hypotheses are difficult to test we probably won't ever know the truth.
 
2014-05-28 06:16:26 AM  

Mugato: That was the one that ate Newman. It didn't have feathers.


That's true. I saw that documentary as well.
 
2014-05-28 06:46:18 AM  
Every time this comes up, I think of this video now.
F U Science (NSFW)

/Every dino was as fluffy as a kiwi
 
2014-05-28 07:44:17 AM  

DrunkenBob: Every time this comes up, I think of this video now.
F U Science (NSFW)

/Every dino was as fluffy as a kiwi


Something about fluffy kiwi tyrannosaurus makes me giggle.
 
2014-05-28 08:24:47 AM  

Mugato: That was the one that ate Newman. It didn't have feathers.


You know, I'm usually not big on reboots, but I think I would definitely support a reboot/remake of Jurassic Park using our modern understanding of dinosaurs. Keep the characters the same so they can have their minds blown when they see feathers on a Tyrannosaur or a raptor, and overall keep the plot of the movie the same (if anything, make some parts of it closer to the book), but have feathered dinosaurs when appropriate and use more accurate species names (e.g. velociraptor -> utahraptor).

And a feathered dilophosaur would be pretty cool.
 
2014-05-28 09:27:37 AM  

mamoru: Mugato: That was the one that ate Newman. It didn't have feathers.

You know, I'm usually not big on reboots, but I think I would definitely support a reboot/remake of Jurassic Park using our modern understanding of dinosaurs. Keep the characters the same so they can have their minds blown when they see feathers on a Tyrannosaur or a raptor, and overall keep the plot of the movie the same (if anything, make some parts of it closer to the book), but have feathered dinosaurs when appropriate and use more accurate species names (e.g. velociraptor -> utahraptor).

And a feathered dilophosaur would be pretty cool.


IIRC, in one of the Jurassic Park novels (I think it was "The Lost World"?) a baby T-rex was described as having a frill of feathers around its neck.
 
2014-05-28 09:33:17 AM  
There are markings on the bones of certain fossils that indicate feathers.  Feathers have evolved over time, and many of the these were proto-feathers. This article is atrocious.

Feathers.

This is, in my opinion, a much more believable representation of Velociraptor.  They were no taller than your thigh, but holy hell, God help you if it came after you!

img.fark.net
 
2014-05-28 09:35:52 AM  
Also, keep in mind that the tails on guys like that were rigid.  Like a birds.

/Looks more like a big turkey to me
 
2014-05-28 10:12:11 AM  
yeartwo.cinema52.com
 
2014-05-28 12:18:52 PM  
Like this?

i968.photobucket.com
 
2014-05-28 01:00:52 PM  

SpdrJay: Maybe it was having a down day and just wanted to feel pretty.


This just in: All the Dinosaurs were gay, and they were FABULOUS!
 
2014-05-28 02:19:16 PM  

Max Awesome: SpdrJay: Maybe it was having a down day and just wanted to feel pretty.

This just in: All the Dinosaurs were gay, and they were FABULOUS!


Finally, we know how they went extinct!
 
Displayed 23 of 23 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report