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(Popular Mechanics)   The science behind the one-inch punch. No, not the kind you do in the bathroom. Don't think for a second that we don't know what you're doing in there   (popularmechanics.com ) divider line
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4839 clicks; posted to Geek » on 27 May 2014 at 4:20 PM (1 year ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-05-27 02:28:24 PM  
step 1: be Bruce Lee
 
2014-05-27 04:18:51 PM  
Step 2: wire harness.
 
2014-05-27 04:24:31 PM  
Step 3: be a character in an anime
 
2014-05-27 04:25:07 PM  
Step 4: Profit?
 
2014-05-27 04:27:15 PM  
Step 5: Get dubbed badly.
 
2014-05-27 04:45:05 PM  
Somebody couldn't have done a slo-mo version of the punch from the recording they had there? Maybe drawn an illustration or two? I realize it's not great quality, but still...
 
2014-05-27 04:45:25 PM  
Step 6: Acknowledge the 1" punch is neither 1" or a punch, it's a 6" push.

/6" punch looks legit though
 
2014-05-27 04:46:00 PM  
Old news is so exciting!
 
2014-05-27 04:48:44 PM  
Step 7: Get buried alive by Michael Madsen.
 
2014-05-27 04:53:28 PM  
As Lee's shoulder bolts ahead, his arm gets to work. The swift and simultaneous extension of his elbow drives his fist forward. For a final flourish, Rose says, "flicking his wrist just prior to impact may further increase the fist velocity." Once the punch lands on target, Lee pulls back almost immediately. Rose explains that this shortens the impact time of his blow, which compresses the force and makes it all the more powerful.

Huh?

In the comments someone describes what is going on as a crack the whip sort of movement, but otherwise this "shorten the impact time of the blow to compress the force and make it more powerful" sounds less likely than reversing the polarity of a Jefferies Tube.

I would also accept:

+ so as not to get splinters in his fist
+ so as not to let the brick fall on his fist
+ so as not to let his opponent grab his arm or hand
+ to prepare for his next blow

But what do I know of martial arts?
 
2014-05-27 04:59:45 PM  

bighairyguy: Step 6: Acknowledge the 1" punch is neither 1" or a punch, it's a 6" push.

/6" punch looks legit though


That's pretty much it right there... It's also called 'punching past your target'. Hell, I understood that technique as a skinny kid in high school. I had one buddy that thought he was pretty buff, and he was walking around the house flexiing his shiat one day, so I asked if I could punch him. 1 hit with no retaliation. He smirked and said 'sure', obviously thinking I would punch like my foster brother who outweighed me by about 20 pounds, but had no idea what he was doing. I, on the other hand, knocked my friend back about 3 feet before he caught his balance, and left a nice fist-sized welt on his chest. I never got to try a punch on him again. :-)

Just because I know how it works doesn't mean that I could come within a light year of doing what Bruce Lee did, though. I just understand how it works.
 
2014-05-27 04:59:53 PM  
It's sort of like a shock wave that travels through the body.
 
2014-05-27 05:02:01 PM  

RoyBatty: As Lee's shoulder bolts ahead, his arm gets to work. The swift and simultaneous extension of his elbow drives his fist forward. For a final flourish, Rose says, "flicking his wrist just prior to impact may further increase the fist velocity." Once the punch lands on target, Lee pulls back almost immediately. Rose explains that this shortens the impact time of his blow, which compresses the force and makes it all the more powerful.

Huh?

In the comments someone describes what is going on as a crack the whip sort of movement, but otherwise this "shorten the impact time of the blow to compress the force and make it more powerful" sounds less likely than reversing the polarity of a Jefferies Tube.

I would also accept:

+ so as not to get splinters in his fist
+ so as not to let the brick fall on his fist
+ so as not to let his opponent grab his arm or hand
+ to prepare for his next blow

But what do I know of martial arts?


I gathered that the argument was based on impulse. Impulse = Force * time, so if you can deliver the same impulse (change in momentum, m*dv/dt) over a shorter time, you'll get a larger force.

I think that's what they were getting at.  But then, I'm a physicist, not a martial artist.
 
2014-05-27 05:03:58 PM  
Step 8: say "boards don't hit back"

/top five bad ass movie lines of all time.
 
2014-05-27 05:08:56 PM  
www.fompy.net
 
2014-05-27 05:12:51 PM  

varnigus: RoyBatty: As Lee's shoulder bolts ahead, his arm gets to work. The swift and simultaneous extension of his elbow drives his fist forward. For a final flourish, Rose says, "flicking his wrist just prior to impact may further increase the fist velocity." Once the punch lands on target, Lee pulls back almost immediately. Rose explains that this shortens the impact time of his blow, which compresses the force and makes it all the more powerful.

Huh?

In the comments someone describes what is going on as a crack the whip sort of movement, but otherwise this "shorten the impact time of the blow to compress the force and make it more powerful" sounds less likely than reversing the polarity of a Jefferies Tube.

I would also accept:

+ so as not to get splinters in his fist
+ so as not to let the brick fall on his fist
+ so as not to let his opponent grab his arm or hand
+ to prepare for his next blow

But what do I know of martial arts?

I gathered that the argument was based on impulse. Impulse = Force * time, so if you can deliver the same impulse (change in momentum, m*dv/dt) over a shorter time, you'll get a larger force.

I think that's what they were getting at.  But then, I'm a physicist, not a martial artist.


That's what I'm guessing. As a martial artist I've been told that by limiting the contact time between face and fist allows less force to be absorbed back into the fist and remain in the face. There's probably some physics around that too, or just BS.
 
2014-05-27 05:14:50 PM  

Mikey1969: bighairyguy: Step 6: Acknowledge the 1" punch is neither 1" or a punch, it's a 6" push.

/6" punch looks legit though

That's pretty much it right there... It's also called 'punching past your target'. Hell, I understood that technique as a skinny kid in high school. I had one buddy that thought he was pretty buff, and he was walking around the house flexiing his shiat one day, so I asked if I could punch him. 1 hit with no retaliation. He smirked and said 'sure', obviously thinking I would punch like my foster brother who outweighed me by about 20 pounds, but had no idea what he was doing. I, on the other hand, knocked my friend back about 3 feet before he caught his balance, and left a nice fist-sized welt on his chest. I never got to try a punch on him again. :-)

Just because I know how it works doesn't mean that I could come within a light year of doing what Bruce Lee did, though. I just understand how it works.


I saw Bruce Lee demonstrate the 1" punch on a talk show, and a key part of it was the punchee being back on his heels, so of course any teeny amount of force would have knocked over.

whither_apophis: Step 8: say "boards don't hit back"

/top five bad ass movie lines of all time.


Bill Cosby version of trying to break a brick:

You: I can break it, I can break it.
Brick: Oh no you can't, oh no you can't.
 
2014-05-27 05:18:31 PM  
groparu.ro
 
2014-05-27 05:22:05 PM  

RoyBatty: As Lee's shoulder bolts ahead, his arm gets to work. The swift and simultaneous extension of his elbow drives his fist forward. For a final flourish, Rose says, "flicking his wrist just prior to impact may further increase the fist velocity." Once the punch lands on target, Lee pulls back almost immediately. Rose explains that this shortens the impact time of his blow, which compresses the force and makes it all the more powerful.

Huh?

In the comments someone describes what is going on as a crack the whip sort of movement, but otherwise this "shorten the impact time of the blow to compress the force and make it more powerful" sounds less likely than reversing the polarity of a Jefferies Tube.

I would also accept:

+ so as not to get splinters in his fist
+ so as not to let the brick fall on his fist
+ so as not to let his opponent grab his arm or hand
+ to prepare for his next blow

But what do I know of martial arts?


I saw that part too and got confused. I didn't think it worked like that
 
2014-05-27 05:31:34 PM  

ronin56003: varnigus: RoyBatty: As Lee's shoulder bolts ahead, his arm gets to work. The swift and simultaneous extension of his elbow drives his fist forward. For a final flourish, Rose says, "flicking his wrist just prior to impact may further increase the fist velocity." Once the punch lands on target, Lee pulls back almost immediately. Rose explains that this shortens the impact time of his blow, which compresses the force and makes it all the more powerful.

Huh?

In the comments someone describes what is going on as a crack the whip sort of movement, but otherwise this "shorten the impact time of the blow to compress the force and make it more powerful" sounds less likely than reversing the polarity of a Jefferies Tube.

I would also accept:

+ so as not to get splinters in his fist
+ so as not to let the brick fall on his fist
+ so as not to let his opponent grab his arm or hand
+ to prepare for his next blow

But what do I know of martial arts?

I gathered that the argument was based on impulse. Impulse = Force * time, so if you can deliver the same impulse (change in momentum, m*dv/dt) over a shorter time, you'll get a larger force.


Impulse is a change in force applied over a time. F*t. It is equal to the change in momentum. mass * delta v.

Pulling back a fist, reduces t, if anything. It would lessen the momentum.
Another way to see this is the force should be applied to the board, and Newton's law would have the board applying the reaction force to the fist. Pulling back his arm only applies another force in this instance, but not to the board, it is just another force to his fist.

Unless there is some crack the whip thing going on, it would seem most people would think he should follow through with his punch to apply more momentum of his fist and arm and body into the board/brick/belly.

http://www.physicsclassroom.com/class/momentum/u4l1b.cfm


I think that's what they were getting at.  But then, I'm a physicist, not a martial artist.

That's what I'm guessing. As a martial artist I've been told that by limiting the contact time between face and fist allows less force to be absorbed back into the fist and remain in the face. There's probably some physics around that too, or just BS.


I can see some sort of kinetic energy argument being applied here as in Newton's cradle.

upload.wikimedia.org

If the face is a ball on the end, and the face is the ball next to it and you leave the fist in place, the face is able to give the energy back to the fist. Remove the fist and the face keeps swinging.

So that might be a reasonable explanation.
 
2014-05-27 05:33:23 PM  
You mean the one I do in the shower or on the toilet? Because they're totally different.

Well, mostly.

/HOW MUCH DO YOU KNOW?!?
 
2014-05-27 05:38:12 PM  
You don't know what I'm doing to my butt in there.
 
2014-05-27 05:39:23 PM  

varnigus: RoyBatty: As Lee's shoulder bolts ahead, his arm gets to work. The swift and simultaneous extension of his elbow drives his fist forward. For a final flourish, Rose says, "flicking his wrist just prior to impact may further increase the fist velocity." Once the punch lands on target, Lee pulls back almost immediately. Rose explains that this shortens the impact time of his blow, which compresses the force and makes it all the more powerful.

Huh?

In the comments someone describes what is going on as a crack the whip sort of movement, but otherwise this "shorten the impact time of the blow to compress the force and make it more powerful" sounds less likely than reversing the polarity of a Jefferies Tube.

I would also accept:

+ so as not to get splinters in his fist
+ so as not to let the brick fall on his fist
+ so as not to let his opponent grab his arm or hand
+ to prepare for his next blow

But what do I know of martial arts?

I gathered that the argument was based on impulse. Impulse = Force * time, so if you can deliver the same impulse (change in momentum, m*dv/dt) over a shorter time, you'll get a larger force.

I think that's what they were getting at.  But then, I'm a physicist, not a martial artist.


So you have this train, and it's headed for a tractor trailer stuck on the tracks.

http://www.fark.com/vidplayer/8274685

You also have this giant spring. And 1 millisecond after impact the truck the spring yanks the train back completely from the truck, reducing the time of impact from two seconds to 1 millisecond.

We can expect more or less damage to the truck?
 
2014-05-27 05:50:28 PM  

RoyBatty: varnigus: RoyBatty: As Lee's shoulder bolts ahead, his arm gets to work. The swift and simultaneous extension of his elbow drives his fist forward. For a final flourish, Rose says, "flicking his wrist just prior to impact may further increase the fist velocity." Once the punch lands on target, Lee pulls back almost immediately. Rose explains that this shortens the impact time of his blow, which compresses the force and makes it all the more powerful.

Huh?

In the comments someone describes what is going on as a crack the whip sort of movement, but otherwise this "shorten the impact time of the blow to compress the force and make it more powerful" sounds less likely than reversing the polarity of a Jefferies Tube.

I would also accept:

+ so as not to get splinters in his fist
+ so as not to let the brick fall on his fist
+ so as not to let his opponent grab his arm or hand
+ to prepare for his next blow

But what do I know of martial arts?

I gathered that the argument was based on impulse. Impulse = Force * time, so if you can deliver the same impulse (change in momentum, m*dv/dt) over a shorter time, you'll get a larger force.

I think that's what they were getting at.  But then, I'm a physicist, not a martial artist.

So you have this train, and it's headed for a tractor trailer stuck on the tracks.

http://www.fark.com/vidplayer/8274685

You also have this giant spring. And 1 millisecond after impact the truck the spring yanks the train back completely from the truck, reducing the time of impact from two seconds to 1 millisecond.

We can expect more or less damage to the truck?


Not sure, but the conductor is gonna have rough day either way.
 
2014-05-27 05:57:22 PM  

bighairyguy: it's a 6" push.


It really is neither of those

but I'm sure if you repeat it enough times, you and all the other internet people with over-inflated egos can convince yourselves it's wasn't something that special and really... probably something you could learn in a weekend.

you know, if you really wanted to
 
2014-05-27 06:02:05 PM  

Mikey1969: 'punching past your target'


no

punching past your target is taught, especially to those new to any hand-to-hand system, so that you land the full force of a punch and don't punch where you think you should be punching (and end up not) but so you actually do land your blows forcefully

Bruce Lee's very methodology for this strike did exactly what you would teach someone NOT to do when learning the above,
he pulled the punch (more of a snap)

But he was the farking master, not one of us with a yellow belt, so instead of failing at hitting someone not only was he hitting them but releasing the full energy onto one exact spot of impact.

So not a 'punch past' or a 'push'
 
2014-05-27 06:02:28 PM  

bighairyguy: I saw Bruce Lee demonstrate the 1" punch on a talk show, and a key part of it was the punchee being back on his heels, so of course any teeny amount of force would have knocked over.


Wow.
 
2014-05-27 06:08:23 PM  

RoyBatty: You also have this giant spring. And 1 millisecond after impact the truck the spring yanks the train back completely from the truck, reducing the time of impact from two seconds to 1 millisecond.

We can expect more or less damage to the truck?


I think it's a bit more complicated than a 101 'train hits truck' physics question.
The human body isn't a train on tracks.

But we'd probably have to learn Mandarin and climb a cold mountain somewhere to learn why.
Maybe something along the lines of throwing a whip at someone vs cracking it?
I don't know...

If they haven't mythbustered this, they should. Because they do a decent job of things down for us less brilliant minds.
 
2014-05-27 06:12:35 PM  
Not trying to play ITG here but as a former Wing Chun practitioner, I'd say that the foundation of the punch starts from your heel.

From there, you're really pushing against the ground to bring your knee to bear, which in turn torques your hip. As your hip rotates forward, it launches your upper body forward so you have to coordinate your shoulder (think of it as extending your arm but localized) and your elbow straightening as your fist is launched toward the target like a pellet from a slingshot or an arrow fired from a bow. The final flick of the wrist adds a bit more oomph (different branches of Wing Chun emphasize connecting with different parts of the fist as the primary point of contact but I was taught to strike with the last two knuckles).

It takes proper technique and timing so a lot of practice is required. You can obviously generate a lot more force if your punch travels a greater distance as it gives you a bit more time and space to accelerate and reach the point where you can maximize the velocity of your punch. Cool parlour trick though.
 
2014-05-27 06:17:34 PM  
Oh, and I almost forgot, the point of focusing on the last two knuckles as the primary point of contact is to minimize the surface area.

High velocity focused in a small area to optimize the penetration and damage of the punch while providing enough structure and support that the attacker can withstand the impact of the punch to minimize the dissipation of force from the recoil.
 
2014-05-27 06:20:12 PM  

RoyBatty: varnigus: RoyBatty: As Lee's shoulder bolts ahead, his arm gets to work. The swift and simultaneous extension of his elbow drives his fist forward. For a final flourish, Rose says, "flicking his wrist just prior to impact may further increase the fist velocity." Once the punch lands on target, Lee pulls back almost immediately. Rose explains that this shortens the impact time of his blow, which compresses the force and makes it all the more powerful.

Huh?

In the comments someone describes what is going on as a crack the whip sort of movement, but otherwise this "shorten the impact time of the blow to compress the force and make it more powerful" sounds less likely than reversing the polarity of a Jefferies Tube.

I would also accept:

+ so as not to get splinters in his fist
+ so as not to let the brick fall on his fist
+ so as not to let his opponent grab his arm or hand
+ to prepare for his next blow

But what do I know of martial arts?

I gathered that the argument was based on impulse. Impulse = Force * time, so if you can deliver the same impulse (change in momentum, m*dv/dt) over a shorter time, you'll get a larger force.

I think that's what they were getting at.  But then, I'm a physicist, not a martial artist.

So you have this train, and it's headed for a tractor trailer stuck on the tracks.

http://www.fark.com/vidplayer/8274685

You also have this giant spring. And 1 millisecond after impact the truck the spring yanks the train back completely from the truck, reducing the time of impact from two seconds to 1 millisecond.

We can expect more or less damage to the truck?


Yeah the "minimize contact time to compress force" is bunk.  Lee's fist is traveling at high speed with tons of kinetic energy and is being actively accelerating pouring more energy in.

When it makes contact with something, energy is transferred into that area of the object.  More energy is better.  Breaks more boards and more bones.

Pulling back would accelerate his fist in the opposite direction...essentially decelerating it.  exerting force in the opposite direction, over time reducing kinetic engery in

The crucial part, imparting energy into his target, doesn't take a lot of time.  When his fist hits his target it it trying to continue to travel in a straight line at high speed.  The target's flesh and bones push back, absorbing the kinetic energy in order to slow Lee's fist down.  It has to because they can't occupy the same space at the same time.  This probably takes milliseconds.

Cracking his body like a whip forward to concentrate energy into his fist is a good maneuver.  Then he lets the target absorb all that energy very fast.  Then he pull backs quickly for some other reason.  Once he's started to pull back, the deed is done.
 
2014-05-27 06:28:54 PM  
 
2014-05-27 06:30:09 PM  

Romanes Eunt Domus: Not trying to play ITG here but as a former Wing Chun practitioner, I'd say that the foundation of the punch starts from your heel.

From there, you're really pushing against the ground to bring your knee to bear, which in turn torques your hip. As your hip rotates forward, it launches your upper body forward so you have to coordinate your shoulder (think of it as extending your arm but localized) and your elbow straightening as your fist is launched toward the target like a pellet from a slingshot or an arrow fired from a bow. The final flick of the wrist adds a bit more oomph (different branches of Wing Chun emphasize connecting with different parts of the fist as the primary point of contact but I was taught to strike with the last two knuckles).

It takes proper technique and timing so a lot of practice is required. You can obviously generate a lot more force if your punch travels a greater distance as it gives you a bit more time and space to accelerate and reach the point where you can maximize the velocity of your punch. Cool parlour trick though.


What is happening here is that you're exploiting the shape and mechanics of your body:

Every muscle group you can involve, you do at the same time.
Each pushes in a way to widen the gap between your fist and your heel.
Your heel presses against the concrete, which presses back.
Your fist then is accelerated to high speed.
 
2014-05-27 06:35:56 PM  

bighairyguy: Step 6: Acknowledge the 1" punch is neither 1" or a punch, it's a 6" push.

/6" punch looks legit though


6" push.

That sounds farking filthy, man.
 
2014-05-27 06:43:25 PM  

That Guy What Stole the Bacon: bighairyguy: Step 6: Acknowledge the 1" punch is neither 1" or a punch, it's a 6" push.

/6" punch looks legit though

6" push.

That sounds farking filthy, man.


You usually have to pay extra for that.
 
2014-05-27 06:54:37 PM  

Romanes Eunt Domus: Not trying to play ITG here but as a former Wing Chun practitioner, I'd say that the foundation of the punch starts from your heel.

From there, you're really pushing against the ground to bring your knee to bear, which in turn torques your hip. As your hip rotates forward, it launches your upper body forward so you have to coordinate your shoulder (think of it as extending your arm but localized) and your elbow straightening as your fist is launched toward the target like a pellet from a slingshot or an arrow fired from a bow. The final flick of the wrist adds a bit more oomph (different branches of Wing Chun emphasize connecting with different parts of the fist as the primary point of contact but I was taught to strike with the last two knuckles).

It takes proper technique and timing so a lot of practice is required. You can obviously generate a lot more force if your punch travels a greater distance as it gives you a bit more time and space to accelerate and reach the point where you can maximize the velocity of your punch. Cool parlour trick though.


That's pretty much what the article says.
 
2014-05-27 07:02:17 PM  
It also helps to use a soft pine board with the grain running top to bottom while the holder is applying pressure to the center. I got randomly pulled out of a crowd at a karate demonstration and broke a board like that way too easily. When it was over I took a look at the board and that was what I found.
 
2014-05-27 07:12:13 PM  

Romanes Eunt Domus: Oh, and I almost forgot, the point of focusing on the last two knuckles as the primary point of contact is to minimize the surface area.

High velocity focused in a small area to optimize the penetration and damage of the punch while providing enough structure and support that the attacker can withstand the impact of the punch to minimize the dissipation of force from the recoil.


I'm also a Wing Chun guy, and I agree with this. I would add that using the last two knuckles also aligns the fist, wrist slightly better than if you were to impact with the whole fist, or the top two knuckles. It also lends itself better to an upward thrust of the punch, to lift the opponent up off their center.

And the analogy of cracking a whip is a good way to look at this whole technique.
 
2014-05-27 07:13:52 PM  

Romanes Eunt Domus: Not trying to play ITG here but as a former Wing Chun practitioner, I'd say that the foundation of the punch starts from your heel.

From there, you're really pushing against the ground to bring your knee to bear, which in turn torques your hip. As your hip rotates forward, it launches your upper body forward so you have to coordinate your shoulder (think of it as extending your arm but localized) and your elbow straightening as your fist is launched toward the target like a pellet from a slingshot or an arrow fired from a bow. The final flick of the wrist adds a bit more oomph (different branches of Wing Chun emphasize connecting with different parts of the fist as the primary point of contact but I was taught to strike with the last two knuckles).

It takes proper technique and timing so a lot of practice is required. You can obviously generate a lot more force if your punch travels a greater distance as it gives you a bit more time and space to accelerate and reach the point where you can maximize the velocity of your punch. Cool parlour trick though.


So he is essentially throwing his entire body into that one punch.
 
2014-05-27 07:16:28 PM  

Esc7: Cracking his body like a whip forward to concentrate energy into his fist is a good maneuver. Then he lets the target absorb all that energy very fast. Then he pull backs quickly for some other reason. Once he's started to pull back, the deed is done.


Pulling back quickly is way extra credit. I've heard it described as creating a suction where the fist used to be. I can't vouch for this bit, but the theory goes, the initial impact does its thing, and the fast removal sets up another blow from inside.
 
2014-05-27 07:24:28 PM  
Here's some better video:  http://youtu.be/en2nM-7XIe4
 
2014-05-27 07:29:19 PM  

Evil High Priest: Romanes Eunt Domus: Oh, and I almost forgot, the point of focusing on the last two knuckles as the primary point of contact is to minimize the surface area.

High velocity focused in a small area to optimize the penetration and damage of the punch while providing enough structure and support that the attacker can withstand the impact of the punch to minimize the dissipation of force from the recoil.

I'm also a Wing Chun guy, and I agree with this. I would add that using the last two knuckles also aligns the fist, wrist slightly better than if you were to impact with the whole fist, or the top two knuckles. It also lends itself better to an upward thrust of the punch, to lift the opponent up off their center.

And the analogy of cracking a whip is a good way to look at this whole technique.


Hung gar is right there with you. Punching with your whole body has the potential to massively increase the force imparted.

/unfortunately, I don't have that potential
 
2014-05-27 07:41:12 PM  
No love for the 0" punch?
i18.photobucket.com
 
2014-05-27 08:03:47 PM  

Evil High Priest: Romanes Eunt Domus: Oh, and I almost forgot, the point of focusing on the last two knuckles as the primary point of contact is to minimize the surface area.

High velocity focused in a small area to optimize the penetration and damage of the punch while providing enough structure and support that the attacker can withstand the impact of the punch to minimize the dissipation of force from the recoil.

I'm also a Wing Chun guy, and I agree with this. I would add that using the last two knuckles also aligns the fist, wrist slightly better than if you were to impact with the whole fist, or the top two knuckles. It also lends itself better to an upward thrust of the punch, to lift the opponent up off their center.

And the analogy of cracking a whip is a good way to look at this whole technique.


The whip analogy was also a popular one during my instruction. Actually, it was any number of weapons: whip, bow, slingshot, flail, etc.

That was the other part that I didn't get into: proper alignment of the wrist and fist to hit your target flush to mitigate the risk of injuring your own hand while throwing the punch. Rolling your wrist awkwardly and spraining it while throwing the punch would really be a worst-case scenario, imo.
 
2014-05-27 08:34:55 PM  

MurphyMurphy:


Bruce Lee's very methodology for this strike did exactly what you would teach someone NOT to do when learning the above,
he pulled the punch (more of a snap)

But he was the farking master,



physicalupgradesj.com

Bruce Lee was the "master" of a martial art he simply made up and marketed with half baked psuedo philosophies.
 
2014-05-27 08:37:29 PM  
Does anyone remember that Stan Lee's Superhumans show? They had a martial artist who did a one inch punch and it was literally his strongest punch. They even used the machines they measure car crashes with and everything! It was pretty cool actually.
 
2014-05-27 09:16:17 PM  
Here's how it was explained to me:

F = ma

You punch slightly past your target, creating the initial shock and crumpling the guy's nose for instance.  In this case, a = v1- 0 assuming the nose was at rest.  Before your fist loses too much velocity you pull it back, allowing the nose to uncrumple quickly. That acts as a second shock with a much greater acceleration (approximately v1 - v2, where v2 is negative). The mass of the nose doesn't change, so if v1 = |v2|, you've essentially tripled the force of your punch.

It made sense to me at the time.

/assume spherical chickens
 
2014-05-27 09:16:57 PM  
The one-inch punch comes in very handy if you're buried alive.

3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-05-27 10:03:57 PM  
Master of Karate

www.costumzee.com
 
2014-05-27 11:31:48 PM  
Um. Yeah. Didn't these researchers ever watch or read History's Strongest Disciple Kenichi?
 
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