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(NPR)   Moisture farming becomes reality in Sudan. Droids to translate binary language cost extra   (npr.org) divider line 36
    More: Cool, droid, Sudan, moisture farms, farming, LED bulbs, languages, human waste, inventions  
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1634 clicks; posted to Geek » on 27 May 2014 at 6:20 PM (26 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



36 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-05-27 05:34:43 PM  
"Once locals have the necessary know-how, they will be able to teach other villages and communities to build the WarkaWater towers," says Vittori, who is already working on WarkaWater 2.0, an upgraded version that may include solar panels and LED bulbs to provide light after dark.

Ok so does this thing work? It can supposedly provide water for up to 7 people. I am skeptical, to be honest.

And this. This add on stuff? Meh. Keep the solution simple.
 
2014-05-27 06:19:16 PM  
Moisture farming....

heahea.org
 
2014-05-27 06:22:21 PM  

the_sidewinder: Moisture farming....

[heahea.org image 300x314]


fap
 
2014-05-27 06:23:27 PM  
Okay, so I'm going to admit my ignorance here and ask a legit question. How is this going to affect people down-stream (weather pattern wise) in the long run? If you're pulling moisture from the air in an area where there historically has been very little rainfall, is that going to, in essence, steal water volume from somewhere further down the system?
 
2014-05-27 06:26:45 PM  

Nadie_AZ: Ok so does this thing work? It can supposedly provide water for up to 7 people. I am skeptical, to be honest.


Yes.  In less arid regions, if you're lost in the woods you can construct a cloth condenser/dewcatcher that'll give you enough water to keep you alive without risking the running water from a tin cup and a handkerchief.  It's a very common little survival method dating back to at least the Boer war.

You're probably skeptical because you're over-estimating how much drinking water is actually necessary for a human to survive.  7 people's worth of drinking water is somewhere between one and a few gallons, enough to mitigate the large amount of short-distance shipping they're targeting here but it won't render previously uninhabitable places livable or anything.

This is a scale-up of an old cool idea, not a new cool idea.  Which, in fairness, is what a lot of the best engineering ideas are.
 
2014-05-27 06:31:44 PM  
Obscure?

www.thatfilmguy.net
 
2014-05-27 06:31:49 PM  

tallen702: Okay, so I'm going to admit my ignorance here and ask a legit question. How is this going to affect people down-stream (weather pattern wise) in the long run? If you're pulling moisture from the air in an area where there historically has been very little rainfall, is that going to, in essence, steal water volume from somewhere further down the system?


Similar to the above post-- drinking water is a pretty trivial amount of water in atmospheric terms.  Since most of what's being collected would be dew/ground moisture anyhow, the likelihood of actual environmental impact here is pretty much nil.

Humanity's big water-cyclers are industry and agriculture, we actually don't drink much directly short of a population density on the order of an actual city... and when drinking water is an issue, purity is a bigger issue than availability of raw liquid, generally.  Condensed water has the additional advantage of beig pretty pure in biological terms.
 
2014-05-27 06:32:44 PM  

the_sidewinder: Moisture farming....

[heahea.org image 300x314]


img1.wikia.nocookie.net

Some eye bleach who had moisture I'd like to farm back in the day.
 
2014-05-27 06:35:48 PM  

Mark Ratner: Obscure?

[www.thatfilmguy.net image 850x566]


Battlestar Galactica is not obscure.
 
2014-05-27 06:40:19 PM  

Mugato: Mark Ratner: Obscure?

[www.thatfilmguy.net image 850x566]

Battlestar Galactica is not obscure.


Sorry, you're thinking of Battle Beyond the Stars if you're talking about that one with the guy from the A-Team.
 
2014-05-27 06:44:23 PM  
WarkaWater

img4.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2014-05-27 06:44:40 PM  

Mugato: Mark Ratner: Obscure?

[www.thatfilmguy.net image 850x566]

Battlestar Galactica is not obscure.


blu.stb.s-msn.com
 
2014-05-27 06:50:14 PM  

Jim_Callahan: Nadie_AZ: Ok so does this thing work? It can supposedly provide water for up to 7 people. I am skeptical, to be honest.

Yes.  In less arid regions, if you're lost in the woods you can construct a cloth condenser/dewcatcher that'll give you enough water to keep you alive without risking the running water from a tin cup and a handkerchief.  It's a very common little survival method dating back to at least the Boer war.

You're probably skeptical because you're over-estimating how much drinking water is actually necessary for a human to survive.  7 people's worth of drinking water is somewhere between one and a few gallons, enough to mitigate the large amount of short-distance shipping they're targeting here but it won't render previously uninhabitable places livable or anything.

This is a scale-up of an old cool idea, not a new cool idea.  Which, in fairness, is what a lot of the best engineering ideas are.


I've tried a still using a plastic bag, rock and tree branches. I got some green water. Like not a glass full.

As for how much is needed - 2 gallons a day in a hot environment. Bathing isn't a daily requirement, though nice to have.
 
2014-05-27 06:52:15 PM  

Mark Ratner: Obscure?

[www.thatfilmguy.net image 850x566]


www.demotivationalposters.org
 
2014-05-27 07:01:01 PM  

Mark Ratner: Obscure?

[www.thatfilmguy.net image 850x566]


Dr. Who and his Tardis?
 
2014-05-27 07:01:53 PM  
But will it put a crimp in my mustache hair from wearing the nosetube?
 
2014-05-27 07:17:58 PM  
It's been done.
techandle.files.wordpress.com
 
2014-05-27 07:35:59 PM  
A Dune reference would have worked better.
 
2014-05-27 07:38:51 PM  

SpaceBison: It's been done.
[techandle.files.wordpress.com image 502x334]


That's the first thing I thought of .
 
2014-05-27 07:43:26 PM  
Make sure the protocol droid speaks Bocchi.
 
2014-05-27 07:48:20 PM  
Oh Great! What about the companies that sell bottled water and pumps and other shiat like that? How are they going to feed their families and appreciate share holder value if these freeloaders get all their water for... free?

There goes all the good air moisture.  These people are going to ruin the econo... I mean the environment. It's either a boondoggle, a socialist plot or a false flag, I have to consult my conservapedia to find out what everyone else is going to wharrrgrble it.
 
2014-05-27 07:48:31 PM  
Pie droid can do grate speech recognition, see you?
 
2014-05-27 07:50:12 PM  

Nadie_AZ: "Once locals have the necessary know-how, they will be able to teach other villages and communities to build the WarkaWater towers," says Vittori, who is already working on WarkaWater 2.0, an upgraded version that may include solar panels and LED bulbs to provide light after dark.

Ok so does this thing work? It can supposedly provide water for up to 7 people. I am skeptical, to be honest.

And this. This add on stuff? Meh. Keep the solution simple.


While it's not a closed system you better believe someone/critters down wind will pay the price.
 
2014-05-27 07:52:50 PM  
 
2014-05-27 08:19:00 PM  

BullBearMS: A Dune reference would have worked better.


That thing looks like its good for a couple literjons a day.
 
2014-05-27 08:21:30 PM  

2wolves: Nadie_AZ: "Once locals have the necessary know-how, they will be able to teach other villages and communities to build the WarkaWater towers," says Vittori, who is already working on WarkaWater 2.0, an upgraded version that may include solar panels and LED bulbs to provide light after dark.

Ok so does this thing work? It can supposedly provide water for up to 7 people. I am skeptical, to be honest.

And this. This add on stuff? Meh. Keep the solution simple.

While it's not a closed system you better believe someone/critters down wind will pay the price.


Compare the size of the moisture collector to the sky around it and think for a bit.
 
2014-05-27 08:25:04 PM  

2wolves: While it's not a closed system you better believe someone/critters down wind will pay the price.


Sure.  How, exactly?  Not unlike Dune, desert doesn't mean low humidity, it means low precipitation.  The wild temperature swings mean that when the hottest part of the day has very dry air, the more dramatic cooling at night can bring the relative humidity up to the point that dew will form - ideal for the right apparatus.  Do you think a sizeable chunk of Sudanese could consume the water from even a hundred cubic miles (out of millions) of air, at least for personal use?  There are 150 billion cubic feet per cubic mile, at saturation (70 degrees F) that is 157 million pounds of water, if at worst 10 percent is recoverable that is 15 million pounds of water.  At 8 pounds per gallon that is just under 2 million gallons of water.  At 10 gallons/person/day that gives enough water for 200k people per day, far greater than the population of that square mile.  Let's say at %50 relative humidity the system could only recover 2 gallons/person/day -  that is enough for clean drinking water for a lot of people.  It is still a negligible amount to affect climate downwind.
 
2014-05-27 08:28:12 PM  

2wolves: While it's not a closed system you better believe someone/critters down wind will pay the price.


Not to mention, humans don't actually consume water.  We rent it.  When the people drink atmospherically recovered water, they piss it out, the water evaporates, and the climate downwind is none the wiser.
 
2014-05-27 08:35:10 PM  

ko_kyi: 2wolves: While it's not a closed system you better believe someone/critters down wind will pay the price.

Not to mention, humans don't actually consume water.  We rent it.  When the people drink atmospherically recovered water, they piss it out, the water evaporates, and the climate downwind is none the wiser.


Heh, I think the same thing about the magical journey of Canadian beer into America's beer.
 
2014-05-27 08:38:41 PM  

BumpInTheNight: Heh, I think the same thing about the magical journey of Canadian beer into America's beer.


Which explains Tecate
 
2014-05-27 09:40:15 PM  
Just make sure that none of the droids have any bad Motivators.
 
2014-05-27 11:14:50 PM  

Kanemano: [images.gizmag.com image 530x297]
[www.designboom.com image 818x460]

Peru already has a working version


wait the billboard... wait wat? the billboard... it... wait I... how...

/I see
//the surface area
 
2014-05-27 11:20:36 PM  

fs.weatherspark.com.s3.amazonaws.com

Relative Humidity, Sudan

 
2014-05-28 03:43:16 AM  

ko_kyi: 2wolves: While it's not a closed system you better believe someone/critters down wind will pay the price.

Not to mention, humans don't actually consume water.  We rent it.  When the people drink atmospherically recovered water, they piss it out, the water evaporates, and the climate downwind is none the wiser.


Hmm, somewhat closed. Consumers are nearby so recycling some of what they piss out. Does it improve efficiency if they piss closer to it?
 
2014-05-28 03:47:57 AM  
Ethiopia and Sudan- different places.
 
2014-05-28 04:00:08 AM  

BullBearMS: A Dune reference would have worked better.


That was covered here:

Mark Ratner: Obscure?

[www.thatfilmguy.net image 850x566]

 
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