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(Phys Org2)   Have you ever wondered how DNA is "edited" to correct genetic diseases? Researches have now seen the process, and this is what it looks like   (phys.org) divider line 23
    More: Interesting, DNA, genetic diseases, nucleic acids, base pairs, Bristol University, National Academy of Sciences, RNA  
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2247 clicks; posted to Geek » on 27 May 2014 at 11:11 PM (13 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



23 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-05-27 10:23:39 PM
These enzymes have been tailored to accurately target a single combination of letters within the three billion base pairs of the DNA molecule. This is the equivalent of correcting a single misspelt word in a 23-volume encyclopedia.

That's pretty impressive, I can't seem to get through a single post wihtout making a typo.
 
2014-05-27 11:22:39 PM
From what I remember from college biology it looks like a bunch of hung-over undergrads stumbling through a lab grade.
 
2014-05-27 11:23:45 PM
Whenever I see this in a movie I think, sure we may one day be able to seed modified DNA through our bone marrow.  Chimera is real.  But how is it supposed to get into each skin cell to turn someone into a lizard person?
 
2014-05-27 11:35:22 PM
No helpful images or drawings in article. I'll just supply my own.

What a CRISPR may look like:
img.fark.net
 
2014-05-27 11:44:04 PM

SteakMan: Whenever I see this in a movie I think, sure we may one day be able to seed modified DNA through our bone marrow.  Chimera is real.  But how is it supposed to get into each skin cell to turn someone into a lizard person?


The thing is, it doesn't have to. If done right, the old tissue sloughs off naturally over time and the new tissue that replaces it is lizard tissue. If done incorrectly, either the old tissue recognizes the new tissue as foriegn and begins an autoimmune response which will likely kill the patient, or the new tissue will do the same and put the patient through an incredibly agonizing metamorphasis, but probably survive.
 
2014-05-28 12:10:06 AM

Langston: These enzymes have been tailored to accurately target a single combination of letters within the three billion base pairs of the DNA molecule. This is the equivalent of correcting a single misspelt word in a 23-volume encyclopedia.

That's pretty impressive, I can't seem to get through a single post wihtout making a typo.


Wow. Just wiw.
 
2014-05-28 12:34:21 AM
The facts of life... to make an alteration in the evolvement of an organic life system is fatal. A coding sequence cannot be revised once it's been established.

Because by the second day of incubation, any cells that have undergone reversion mutation give rise to revertant colonies, like rats leaving a sinking ship; then the ship... sinks.
 
2014-05-28 12:39:52 AM
I've started using crispr in the lab. For about $1000, one person can do in three months what would have taken $10,000 and 6 months just two years ago. It's been a nice technological leap.
 
2014-05-28 01:51:32 AM

Naesen: The thing is, it doesn't have to. If done right, the old tissue sloughs off naturally over time and the new tissue that replaces it is lizard tissue. If done incorrectly, either the old tissue recognizes the new tissue as foriegn and begins an autoimmune response which will likely kill the patient, or the new tissue will do the same and put the patient through an incredibly agonizing metamorphasis, but probably survive.


What, like The Fly?
 
2014-05-28 01:57:04 AM

Ishkur: Naesen: The thing is, it doesn't have to. If done right, the old tissue sloughs off naturally over time and the new tissue that replaces it is lizard tissue. If done incorrectly, either the old tissue recognizes the new tissue as foriegn and begins an autoimmune response which will likely kill the patient, or the new tissue will do the same and put the patient through an incredibly agonizing metamorphasis, but probably survive.

What, like The Fly?


I was thinking more like Threshold

/painful to those who watched
 
2014-05-28 03:02:22 AM
And what is what it looks like? The DNA stock photo? I'm disappointed there's apparently no video of it.
 
Zel
2014-05-28 03:30:24 AM

UsikFark: And what is what it looks like? The DNA stock photo? I'm disappointed there's apparently no video of it.


The one time I wish an article was a video, it's a PDF behind a paywall.
 
2014-05-28 03:44:23 AM

Zel: UsikFark: And what is what it looks like? The DNA stock photo? I'm disappointed there's apparently no video of it.

The one time I wish an article was a video, it's a PDF behind a paywall.


Most scientific journals have paywalls for full articles, but subby's headline had me hoping there was a video or even a still frame of what the researchers saw.
 
2014-05-28 03:45:32 AM

SteakMan: Whenever I see this in a movie I think, sure we may one day be able to seed modified DNA through our bone marrow.  Chimera is real.  But how is it supposed to get into each skin cell to turn someone into a lizard person?


well I'd guess this kinda stuff borrows a bit from intuitive sci-fi writers and you are pretty much 'hacking' the body's repair mechanisms.  You essentially heal the changes in.
 
2014-05-28 08:07:42 AM
How we  can edit genetic diseases. Currently genetic diseases aren't edited. The CRISPr system is pretty amazing though, and quite a feat of engineering in its own right to get them to the stage they are today. Quite a few colleagues are doing (or starting) some really cool stuff using them.
 
2014-05-28 09:20:02 AM
Good, CRISPr, fix my Sjögren's. Then we can start discussing the Lupus.... and maybe I'll let you at my sister's Crohn's.
 
2014-05-28 09:23:58 AM
Biophysical constraints on protein folding suggest that life is not just big ol' bags o' chemistry, and that anyone who suggests such a thing is not aware of any biologically plausible models in which ecological variation is linked to ecological adaptations.

People who cannot grasp the complexity of patterns that link physics, chemistry, and conserved molecular mechanisms to the molecular biology of life seem most likely to think in terms that dismiss anything currently known about how the epigenetic landscape is linked to the physical landscape of DNA in the organized genomes of species from microbes to man.

The idea that an asteroid somehow created chiral amino acids but left glycine to be substituted and stabilize the genomes of microbes and to also stabilize the decapeptide, GnRH in mammals, is one that I think serious scientists can most appreciate as the pseudoscientific nonsense of theorists who think in terms of randomness and evolution.


www.reactionface.info
 
2014-05-28 09:53:04 AM
CRISPR is pretty damned awesome, and is going to be a real game-changer in the lab.  Hopefully it'll lead to big changes in the clinic as well.
 
2014-05-28 01:50:12 PM
CRISPRs are a real game changer for work in the lab! They are surprisingly easy to make... a week of lab work and you are ready to inject!

And for sequences that do not have a good CRISPR target site, TALENS work just as well, but are somewhat more complicated to make.
 
2014-05-28 02:26:56 PM

UsikFark: Zel: UsikFark: And what is what it looks like? The DNA stock photo? I'm disappointed there's apparently no video of it.

The one time I wish an article was a video, it's a PDF behind a paywall.

Most scientific journals have paywalls for full articles, but subby's headline had me hoping there was a video or even a still frame of what the researchers saw.


That video of the DNA replication is what I was expecting.  It seems this animation is old, but I think they recently captured actual video of the process,  or maybe I just found out about it recently.
 
2014-05-28 05:58:28 PM
/PNAS
 
2014-05-28 08:57:27 PM

SpdrJay: The facts of life... to make an alteration in the evolvement of an organic life system is fatal. A coding sequence cannot be revised once it's been established.

Because by the second day of incubation, any cells that have undergone reversion mutation give rise to revertant colonies, like rats leaving a sinking ship; then the ship... sinks.


What about EMS recombination?
 
2014-05-29 01:17:04 AM

Wake Up Sheeple: No helpful images or drawings in article. I'll just supply my own.

What a CRISPR may look like:
[img.fark.net image 616x462]


The real question is whether tomatoes belong in the refrigerator or what.  What if they'er GMO?
 
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