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(The New York Times)   Gene mapping meets craft beer: and the yeast among you shall be the first   (nytimes.com) divider line 14
    More: Cool  
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546 clicks; posted to Geek » on 26 May 2014 at 7:56 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



14 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-05-26 07:18:25 PM  
Some people claim they are trying to make the world a better place. These scientists are really doing it!

*sniff* They make me so proud!
 
2014-05-26 09:12:12 PM  

Snarfangel: Some people claim they are trying to make the world a better place. These scientists are really doing it!

*sniff* They make me so proud!


This is why the applied sciences are so important.
 
2014-05-26 09:16:26 PM  
The perfect yeast was invented already: Wyeast 1968...

/ brewer geek
// Ninkasi uses it for everything
 
2014-05-26 09:17:27 PM  
Amen.
 
2014-05-26 09:38:02 PM  

Elzar: The perfect yeast was invented already: Wyeast 1968...

/ brewer geek
// Ninkasi uses it for everything


So does Big Sky
 
2014-05-26 09:50:21 PM  
At Santa Clara Valley Brewing we use White Labs 090 for our IPA.  Ferments out quick and clean.

/Got a barrel-aged all-Brett seasonal coming out soon though.
 
2014-05-26 10:25:06 PM  
I'd make a S288C joke here, but sigma1278b has made enough of those thanks to the FLO8 issue.

Also didn't someone already do this on a smaller scale with several strains used by Foster's several years ago.  I swear I read a paper on that subject.

Still prefer SC5314.

/C. albicans FTW
 
2014-05-26 11:34:06 PM  
FYI Anti-GMO people... is this exactly like stem cell research. You're opposed to it for "reasons" but now you're preventing us from scientific progress. And the cost... I can only imagine...

And while the genetic tools already exist to create new yeasts artificially - by splicing genes from one to another - because of the longstanding stigma associated with genetically modified foods, there is no market for them.
"Right now we have a few hundred genetically modified yeast strains patiently waiting in our laboratory's freezer," said Jan Steensels, a microbiologist with the Belgian lab, "but most brewers and consumers don't want anything to do with them." The data from the genomic project could allow researchers to design and breed new brewing yeasts without resorting to genetic modification.
By knowing which genes to track, and using computers and robotics to speed the process, a researcher could mate two different yeast strains thousands of times until, by chance, they produced an offspring with the perfect combination of genetic characteristics. "So let's say there's a yeast that produces an amazing fruity aroma in beer, but can't ferment past 3 percent alcohol," said Chris E. Baugh, a microbiologist at Sierra Nevada Brewing Company in Chico, Calif., who is not involved in the project. A scientist who understood the genetics, he continued, "could then breed it with a more alcohol-tolerant strain."


So whenever you ask why are you opposed to anti-GMO loonies... this. This is why. Blocking GMO prevents direct manipulation and forces useless manual cross breeding thousands upon thousands of times to achieve the same result. They've literally already done the research, made the strains, but until it's "natural" you don't want it. We've been GMOing our Brewer's yeast for tens of thousands of years... now that we can do it with intent and faster and directly... it's somehow wrong?
 
2014-05-26 11:35:54 PM  

DenisVengeance: At Santa Clara Valley Brewing we use White Labs 090 for our IPA.  Ferments out quick and clean.

/Got a barrel-aged all-Brett seasonal coming out soon though.



I'm curious.  How often does an ethical brewer buy yeast from someone like White and Wyeast?  On the one hand, you want them to get paid for doing all the work to strain all those yeasts and classifying them and having it available and all that.  On the other hand, at the bottom of the fermenter cone is all that yeast, perfectly cromulent and just itching to do another batch of beer, and with not too much care you could keep it alive forever.   Do you ever just say, "Look here's a few bucks but save the shipping -- your yeast is already in our wort?"
 
2014-05-27 01:39:56 AM  
They should just take their GMOed strains out of the freezer and tell the world that they're the product of diligent cross breeding or a lucky find from yeast in the wild. Screw the neo-Luddites of the world.
 
2014-05-27 05:32:03 AM  
The things I learn on Fark. I never knew this existed.
 
2014-05-27 10:20:46 AM  

Manfred J. Hattan: DenisVengeance: At Santa Clara Valley Brewing we use White Labs 090 for our IPA.  Ferments out quick and clean.

/Got a barrel-aged all-Brett seasonal coming out soon though.


I'm curious.  How often does an ethical brewer buy yeast from someone like White and Wyeast?  On the one hand, you want them to get paid for doing all the work to strain all those yeasts and classifying them and having it available and all that.  On the other hand, at the bottom of the fermenter cone is all that yeast, perfectly cromulent and just itching to do another batch of beer, and with not too much care you could keep it alive forever.   Do you ever just say, "Look here's a few bucks but save the shipping -- your yeast is already in our wort?"


I haven't had to buy the same yeast from them twice. Nothing against wyeast, I just haven't used them. But there is a collection of WLP's in my fridge. I wash the trub you are talking about put it back in the vial. Next time I want to use it I make a starter and put it on the stir plate.

I always get great fermentation in a few hours. Saves me about %10 on every batch.

Now if I could just get my skeeter pee to take off
 
2014-05-27 01:32:44 PM  

Manfred J. Hattan: DenisVengeance: At Santa Clara Valley Brewing we use White Labs 090 for our IPA.  Ferments out quick and clean.

/Got a barrel-aged all-Brett seasonal coming out soon though.


I'm curious.  How often does an ethical brewer buy yeast from someone like White and Wyeast?  On the one hand, you want them to get paid for doing all the work to strain all those yeasts and classifying them and having it available and all that.  On the other hand, at the bottom of the fermenter cone is all that yeast, perfectly cromulent and just itching to do another batch of beer, and with not too much care you could keep it alive forever.   Do you ever just say, "Look here's a few bucks but save the shipping -- your yeast is already in our wort?"


Depending on strain, yeast care, and wort it's being re-pitched into, you can get about 12-16 generations without any significant off flavors.  Most breweries wash the yeast and re-pitch, so 12-16 would be about as many times you'd want to do that.  After that, the yeast will not perform ideally and you'll run greater risk of off flavors, like diacetyl for example.
 
2014-05-27 11:01:11 PM  
Exactly what Bruxellensis said.
 
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