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(Popular Science)   Is a Soylent-only diet good for you? Hint: it's not, people   (popsci.com) divider line 23
    More: Interesting, Soylent, mice eat, foods, lab animals, diets, mice  
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1919 clicks; posted to Geek » on 27 May 2014 at 6:30 AM (8 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



23 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-05-27 04:22:52 AM
img.fark.net
 
2014-05-27 07:04:44 AM
I am surprised.
 
2014-05-27 07:06:36 AM
I hear it contains sucralose, which I'm not so wild about.
 
2014-05-27 07:35:14 AM
I'd go 100% Soylent before I'd go 100% McDonalds.
 
2014-05-27 08:35:09 AM
As someone who is sensitive to Soy and has to be very careful how much he consumes, I wish people would stop trying to pass it off as the most healthy stuff on the face of the Earth.

/and how many animals live in those soybean fields?
//insects and birds too?
///all those fertilizers, herbicides and pesticides are awesome for the environment, right?
////veganism is also murder, you're just not eating your victims.
 
2014-05-27 08:41:13 AM
NRB... Pretty sure soylent contains no soy.

I have a solution to this problem: Soylent + sugar-free gum.
 
2014-05-27 08:51:02 AM
Quite a few issues I have with this study, though I am trying to ask actual relevant questions and not just shiat on the scientists who performed it (in other words IANA scientist and am trying to not be dismissed with a simple "you're dumb, GTFO"):

First, another version of the abstract shows most of the people who worked on this have their stated fields as things like "advanced prosthetic dentistry" and "oral dysfunction science" (there's also one listed as a pharmacologist). Are people in fields like that usually given the education in nutrition related studies sufficient to properly test something like this? Or am I wrong to even ask since it could be part of their education they took on manually? I seriously don't know so any Farker who could answer please let me know.

Second, exactly what "powdered food" did the people doing this testing actually use? Did they obtain actual Soylent? Did they just mix up their own stuff using one of the DIY recipes from part of the Soylent site? Or did they actually take the time to balance the nutrients for the daily value of what a mouse would need and make other fine touches? If you've read the Soylent guy's blog you'll see he found that his first attempts spiked his blood sugar because his body absorbed it too quickly, and adding fiber to the mix slowed it down and eliminated that problem.

Third, why didn't they separate the groups of mice during those last 2 weeks to have half get the " human glucagon-like peptide-1 analog, liraglutide (a new drug with protective effects against neuronal and cardiovascular diseases)" and the other half stay untouched beyond diet as a control? Crossing studies like that doesn't sound like an optimal situation without a safeguard like that from my personal reasoning.

My Google-fu is a bit weak but I couldn't find a version of the study which is not behind a paywall or other login area limiting its access, which is annoying as even if you're not a scientist you should be able to at least ask a friend with sufficient background to interpret it for you. Also, Sucralose is literally the LAST ingredient in the stuff per the nutritional chart, after Xantham Gum, so it's probably just a minute amount either to improve the taste without affecting the nutrition greatly (or maybe somehow to be broken up for its chlorine?), and the only actual Soy in it is Soy Lecithin, and there's a bit more of that in it than Salt.
 
2014-05-27 09:15:53 AM
Physically, it may be fine for you, but I'd be depressed and ready to kill myself after a few days of not eating real food. Maybe you could make it work for you if you are already living your life in a hamster wheel where you feel like you can't stop to eat a real meal, but the thought of that kind of lifestyle is already depressing enough without adding a dystopian food product into the mix.
 
2014-05-27 09:36:44 AM
I find the stuff intriguing but I question the wisdom of going 100% Soylent.  That said, I see some very practical applications for it.

It looks like a portable way to carry nutrients when I am out on day long bike rides.  Normally the food offered during charity rides or available at the corner stores I pass is too doesn't sit well for about an hour.  The Soylent looks like it is easily digested and might be a good alternative.

The author of New Yorker article I read about Soylent said she felt full almost immediately after trying it, I wonder if an obese person would prefer a 100% Soylent diet over invasive surgeries.  If a 100% Soylent diet is too hard to stick to, a regiment where 2 of your 3 meals are Soylent and 1 is a traditional meal might be maintainable.  Or a small glass of Soylent with the traditional meal might give the feeling of satiety which results in eating less.
 
2014-05-27 10:03:52 AM

Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: As someone who is sensitive to Soy and has to be very careful how much he consumes, I wish people would stop trying to pass it off as the most healthy stuff on the face of the Earth.

/and how many animals live in those soybean fields?
//insects and birds too?
///all those fertilizers, herbicides and pesticides are awesome for the environment, right?
////veganism is also murder, you're just not eating your victims.


This will sound like a joke, but it's not. Soylent™ contains only a tiny trace amount of soy, and the explicitly stated reason for that is that they were afraid of being sued for false advertising if they didn't put some in.
 
2014-05-27 10:24:41 AM

Argonreality: Second, exactly what "powdered food" did the people doing this testing actually use? Did they obtain actual Soylent?


While it doesn't say, the mice in the study were given the same foods - just one was in powdered form, and the other in pellet form.  They could have, e.g., simply crushed standard rodent food pellets into a powder.
 
2014-05-27 10:25:04 AM

FoxholeAtheist: NRB... Pretty sure soylent contains no soy.

I have a solution to this problem: Soylent + sugar-free gum.


that is the first thing I thought of after reading the article complaints. So all Rhinheart needs to do now is offer Soylent Gum to help stimulate insulin.
 
2014-05-27 10:38:47 AM

Mad_Radhu: Physically, it may be fine for you, but I'd be depressed and ready to kill myself after a few days of not eating real food. Maybe you could make it work for you if you are already living your life in a hamster wheel where you feel like you can't stop to eat a real meal, but the thought of that kind of lifestyle is already depressing enough without adding a dystopian food product into the mix.


This.

We evolved to chew our food. I'll keep my meats and veggies, kthx.

If this may serve a purpose to aid the fight on world hunger perhaps? I'm all for it.

There is also the flip side of this where it's not environmentally feasible to produce large amounts of soylent. Carbon footprint or something like that.
 
2014-05-27 12:23:02 PM

star_topology: Mad_Radhu: Physically, it may be fine for you, but I'd be depressed and ready to kill myself after a few days of not eating real food. Maybe you could make it work for you if you are already living your life in a hamster wheel where you feel like you can't stop to eat a real meal, but the thought of that kind of lifestyle is already depressing enough without adding a dystopian food product into the mix.

This.

We evolved to chew our food. I'll keep my meats and veggies, kthx.

If this may serve a purpose to aid the fight on world hunger perhaps? I'm all for it.

There is also the flip side of this where it's not environmentally feasible to produce large amounts of soylent. Carbon footprint or something like that.


Evolution does not work that way.

If you use the phrase "evolved to x" then you probably do not understand the first thing about it.

The process of random mutations which are culled by survival of the fittest is not in any way guaranteed to optimize a species for a damn thing. So, there is no reason to believe a pre-chewed food wouldn't be a technilogical improvement over using our raw biological tools. This is as possible for food as it is for shoes. Billions of years of 'evolving to walk barefoot' and I'll wear shoes, tyvm.
 
2014-05-27 01:19:21 PM

Smackledorfer: Billions of years of 'evolving to walk barefoot' and I'll wear shoes, tyvm.


You fool! You'll break evolution! WHY MUST MAN, IN HIS HUBRIS, THINK HIMSELF A GOD?!

/and take those goddamn glasses off, I don't want my kid to be a mole person!
 
2014-05-27 01:21:10 PM
I actually have some of this stuff on order. I'm not terribly concerned with long term health issues as there is no way I will be not eating real food as part of my diet as I have a family, love to eat, and love to cook.
 
2014-05-27 01:34:31 PM

China White Tea: Argonreality: Second, exactly what "powdered food" did the people doing this testing actually use? Did they obtain actual Soylent?

While it doesn't say, the mice in the study were given the same foods - just one was in powdered form, and the other in pellet form.  They could have, e.g., simply crushed standard rodent food pellets into a powder.


I thought the second sentence was pretty clear. The rats were given the same food, one was crushed and one was pellets. That doesn't make it the same as a meal replacement that isn't designed to be chewed. What I don't understand is why the author ignored the stuff hospitals use when someone is on a feeding tube.
 
2014-05-27 02:30:46 PM

nocturnal001: I actually have some of this stuff on order. I'm not terribly concerned with long term health issues as there is no way I will be not eating real food as part of my diet as I have a family, love to eat, and love to cook.


I'm anxiously expecting my own as well, but I'm doing it as they intend - no other food - for two weeks. One of the upsides of being single.
 
2014-05-27 02:45:29 PM

fredbox: I hear it contains sucralose, which I'm not so wild about.


Well, it's not bad for you.  It might be destroying the environment, but we're doing that pretty well anyway..
 
2014-05-27 02:50:45 PM

dj_spanmaster: nocturnal001: I actually have some of this stuff on order. I'm not terribly concerned with long term health issues as there is no way I will be not eating real food as part of my diet as I have a family, love to eat, and love to cook.

I'm anxiously expecting my own as well, but I'm doing it as they intend - no other food - for two weeks. One of the upsides of being single.



I did a day and some other random meals using the DIY version. It was fairly filling.
 
2014-05-27 05:30:52 PM
I'm actually quite interested in the product, as I'm single and don't particularly like how much stuff I end up throwing out when I buy fresh food. I've lived largely off canned goods and frozen foods ever since I quit living at home, which obviously have problems with both sodium and nutrients. I don't eat with other people often, so having something like Soylent available to go any time sounds really appealing.

It beats driving out to get fast food or going to the grocery every single week to get fruits and vegetables.
 
2014-05-27 06:22:23 PM

Tobin_Lam: China White Tea: Argonreality: Second, exactly what "powdered food" did the people doing this testing actually use? Did they obtain actual Soylent?

While it doesn't say, the mice in the study were given the same foods - just one was in powdered form, and the other in pellet form.  They could have, e.g., simply crushed standard rodent food pellets into a powder.

I thought the second sentence was pretty clear. The rats were given the same food, one was crushed and one was pellets. That doesn't make it the same as a meal replacement that isn't designed to be chewed. What I don't understand is why the author ignored the stuff hospitals use when someone is on a feeding tube.


Guess I missed that part. That completely invalidates the study in the case of Soylent as far as I'm concerned then, apples and oranges and whatnot. Wish I could order right away on a recurring basis since it'd be roughly $3 per "meal" at their current pricing if you get the 28 pouch supply, but alas unemployment forces me to hold back for the moment.
 
2014-05-27 11:50:35 PM
Does even the creator of Soylent recommend eating nothing but powder?  I'm fairly certain he eats one conventional meal a day or so.
 
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