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(Marketwatch)   Honor Memorial Day by remembering those who sacrificed their lives in America's 10 deadliest wars   (marketwatch.com) divider line 20
    More: Hero, Memorial Day, deadliest wars  
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4082 clicks; posted to Main » on 26 May 2014 at 7:05 AM (22 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
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2014-05-26 08:12:17 AM  
4 votes:
How about we honor them by not sending kids to die in pointless wars?
2014-05-26 08:51:02 AM  
3 votes:
As an ex-combat vet, and a disabled one at that, I always like to point out on this day not to thank me on May 26th. Any other day is fine, but today is about the fallen vets. There's over 800,000 of them, over 1.3 million if you count those who made the ultimate sacrifice while dying of things, like dysentery, for  their country. Don't thank living vets for that.

Now, I realize many don't know any fallen vets, so tend to bring up friends or family that were the fortunate vets that came home, some more fortunate than others - they still came back. We have our own day. Today isn't about that.

Today is about the fallen ones. Really, that is what this day is about. It can be uncomfortable, but it's necessary. A lot of times death in combat happens to people doing incredibly ordinary uninteresting tasks - think about these guys just one time today between beers - it's not a wake, it's a reflective celebration.

I know using today to thank a vet for their service is a good intention, but you unintentionally can fuel a lot of survivor guilt by thanking and dredging up old memories. A nice quiet reflective beer is all that is needed.

So, right now, spend 5 seconds of this day to use the internet look up a fallen vet - and enjoy the rest of it.
2014-05-26 07:59:06 AM  
2 votes:

eiger: Ecobuckeye: I visited Fort Recovery to remember the biggest defeat of American forces, St. Clair's Defeat.

It's interesting how the Indian wars always get somehow magically overlooked on "patriotism" days. I guess it's uncomfortable to remember that the main point of the U.S. military until the late 1800s was to subjugate Native Americans.


That was a big part of the Ta-Nehisi Coates article in Atlantic (the Fark thread on "The Case for Reparations capped out at about 850 comments).  One of the article's big points was, we embrace Washington and the Founding Fathers and all the good parts about American history, but slavery, Indian displacement/removal/genocide, violence committed against workers during Gilded Age labor disputes, sharecropping, and any number of other atrocities in our history?  We sweep those under the rug and say, "that was a long time ago."

/I would love for the Army to conduct a thorough investigation of every Medal of Honor issued during the Indian Wars and formally revoke a large portion of them, particularly the ones that were issued for things like soldiers finding natives hiding in gullies and wiping them out when one of them raised a gun to defend themselves.
2014-05-26 07:28:58 AM  
2 votes:
And the one where the most were killed? When we fought ourselves.
2014-05-26 01:02:00 AM  
2 votes:
acelebrationofwomen.org
2014-05-26 01:08:38 PM  
1 votes:

Hardy-r-r: BarryTheMasterOfSandwich: The last generation of real Americans.

RIP, America.

No argument here.


We need to evolve out of war completely. We should focus more on promoting peace. That's incredibly hard to do when we have weapons pointed at other countries. We live in fear, mostly...

Human beings cannot survive by warring constantly. At some point, someone or some country will have to take the high road and set a better example, otherwise the problems that we see will persist.

Be the change.
2014-05-26 12:18:42 PM  
1 votes:
I love these threads. So many people whose grandfathers single handedly won WWII. Or they can trace their ancestry and all of their forefathers fought in every single important American battle in history. Apparently mail clerks and the logistics guys didn't have any offspring.
2014-05-26 12:02:25 PM  
1 votes:
farm4.staticflickr.com
2014-05-26 11:37:17 AM  
1 votes:
What's with all the Memorial Day hate this year? I don't remember seeing anything like it; I see all over Facebook "This day is not about barbecues, this is about crying over dead soldiers!" Now, I'm not trying to be crude here; I've got several friends and family who are retired and active duty; but isn't the best way to remember their sacrifice by celebrating our freedom?


Here's a thought:  Celebrate your freedom by remembering their sacrifice. Without it you would have nothing to celebrate.
2014-05-26 11:24:31 AM  
1 votes:
As a native born Southern, I thought I'd include thoughts for the Confederate war dead today as well.

Not for fame or reward
Not for place or for rank
Not lured by ambition
Or goaded by necessity
But in simple
Obedience to duty
As they understood it
These men suffered all
Sacrificed all
Dared all-and died


The Confederate Memorial, Arlington National Cemetary

upload.wikimedia.org

/Note that I am NOT one of those Southern history revisionists.
//You know, the ones who claim the Civil War was over states' rights, against Northern aggression.
///These unfortunate died fighting for the preservation of the slavery of African-Americans.
2014-05-26 11:19:24 AM  
1 votes:

Truther: Leave it to the Fark Progressives to defile the day meant to honor those who made the ultimate sacrifice.

/without their efforts you might not have the ability to sound like a tool on the interwebs


From what I can see, wars nowadays aren't fought for our freedom.  Our military is used to fight for someone else's agenda, then kicked to the curb when they're no longer of any use, the way I see it.

I'm not a "progressive," either...I'm very conservative.

/would have been against vietnam too
//born in 1973
2014-05-26 09:50:41 AM  
1 votes:
I'm reading Jared Diamond right now, so I feel compelled to point out that societies must celebrate dying in war and turn it into an honored and sacred sacrifice, otherwise it would be difficult to convince young men to give up their lives in defense of the power and wealth of the ruling elite (who of course will not be participating in the fighting).
2014-05-26 09:08:32 AM  
1 votes:
What's with all the Memorial Day hate this year? I don't remember seeing anything like it; I see all over Facebook "This day is not about barbecues, this is about crying over dead soldiers!" Now, I'm not trying to be crude here; I've got several friends and family who are retired and active duty; but isn't the best way to remember their sacrifice by celebrating our freedom?
2014-05-26 09:06:32 AM  
1 votes:
My father was a B17 navigator/bomber in ww2 and artillery on the ground in Korea and Viet Nam. Resides in Arlington today. Refused to let me enlist in 69, made me go to college instead. I have his journals from the battles he engaged in. Proud he was my father.
2014-05-26 08:41:30 AM  
1 votes:
Last week I got to tour the caves in Valkenburg, and plain as day, saw my grandfathers signature there... made me super happy. That said... honor the families of the dead guys, not just the soldiers, marines, sailors, and airmen... while dying is hard, explaining to a kid that his dad is dead is harder. Families behind soldiers cheer, stress, move, do logistics, and grieve, all behind the scenes, so servicemembers can do their work.
2014-05-26 08:07:27 AM  
1 votes:

Capo Del Bandito: You *do* know their active orders weren't 'shoot the Red skins on sight!" right?


Except when they were called out to slaughter natives who, having been enslaved and starved by local white settlers, committed the heinous crime of daring to attack settlers who were raping their girls.

/And we named forts and parks after their commander.
2014-05-26 07:57:00 AM  
1 votes:
The biggest enemies before World War 2 were disease and infection.
2014-05-26 07:48:43 AM  
1 votes:

Ecobuckeye: I visited Fort Recovery to remember the biggest defeat of American forces, St. Clair's Defeat.


It's interesting how the Indian wars always get somehow magically overlooked on "patriotism" days. I guess it's uncomfortable to remember that the main point of the U.S. military until the late 1800s was to subjugate Native Americans.
2014-05-26 07:26:49 AM  
1 votes:

BarryTheMasterOfSandwich: The last generation of real Americans.

RIP, America.


No argument here.
2014-05-26 07:16:32 AM  
1 votes:

Hardy-r-r: Years ago I had the honor of meeting an old GI who was in the second wave at Utah Beach and fought all the way to Berlin.

Truly America's greatest generation.


The last generation of real Americans.

RIP, America.
 
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