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(Marketwatch)   Honor Memorial Day by remembering those who sacrificed their lives in America's 10 deadliest wars   (marketwatch.com) divider line 89
    More: Hero, Memorial Day, deadliest wars  
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4070 clicks; posted to Main » on 26 May 2014 at 7:05 AM (8 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-05-26 01:02:00 AM
acelebrationofwomen.org
 
2014-05-26 01:20:54 AM
My grandfathers and two guncles served in WWI, father and five uncles in WWII and Korea, and assorted nephews and nieces in the Gulf War and the GWOT.

Not a one of them got a Purple Heart.  They all walked out alive and more or less in one piece.

Weird.

/dad navigated B-17's out of northern Italy
//the rest of them had to rough it
///god bless America
 
2014-05-26 06:56:48 AM
Years ago I had the honor of meeting an old GI who was in the second wave at Utah Beach and fought all the way to Berlin.

Truly America's greatest generation.
 
2014-05-26 07:16:32 AM

Hardy-r-r: Years ago I had the honor of meeting an old GI who was in the second wave at Utah Beach and fought all the way to Berlin.

Truly America's greatest generation.


The last generation of real Americans.

RIP, America.
 
2014-05-26 07:18:36 AM
news.bbc.co.uk

Respect.
 
2014-05-26 07:18:48 AM
My paternal grandfather and two of his brothers fought in WWII, and my maternal grandfather fought in Korea. They all served honorably and thankfully came home alive.
 
2014-05-26 07:26:49 AM

BarryTheMasterOfSandwich: The last generation of real Americans.

RIP, America.


No argument here.
 
2014-05-26 07:28:58 AM
And the one where the most were killed? When we fought ourselves.
 
2014-05-26 07:31:01 AM
I visited Fort Recovery to remember the biggest defeat of American forces, St. Clair's Defeat.
 
2014-05-26 07:32:36 AM

ghare: And the one where the most were killed? When we fought ourselves.


Just wait. Civil War II will probably go nuclear.
 
2014-05-26 07:41:16 AM

ghare: And the one where the most were killed? When we fought ourselves.


We picked the perfect time in changing technology to create a slaughter on the battlefield.  The first major conflict to utilize the rifled barrel, the ability to direct armies at the strategic level with the telegraph, and move troops with railroads.  Nobody was really prepared to adapt to the new era of warfare.

The telegraph is really under-appreciated as a tool of change.  Think about this - until the advent of the telegraph, information could not travel faster than you were physically capable of moving.  You could get the fastest horse, the fastest ship, the fastest train - but you still are limited by how fast a person could move across the earth.

Now change that to where a signal can be sent as fast as an electrical signal.  While the last sixty years have seen revolutions in the efficiency and mass capability of communication, remember this:  No single invention has been responsible for a proportional increase in the raw speed of information.  Everything else has been incremental in comparison.
 
2014-05-26 07:47:31 AM
From the bottom of my heart, thank you for all of those who served. If you feel compelled to write the name of someone who lost their life due to military service i would love to just read their names and privately thank them.
 
2014-05-26 07:48:38 AM
While my brother isn't allowed to tell me what he did in Afghan, I salute that it was him getting off his ass and doing something that got me moving in my personal life.

4th Generation navy guy he is. Only real bodily harm we've had in times of conflict was my uncle getting a screwdriver to the eye (freak accident when something exploded against the ship, launched him and the 'driver forward), but he still uses that eye to this day. Fark yeah.
 
2014-05-26 07:48:43 AM

Ecobuckeye: I visited Fort Recovery to remember the biggest defeat of American forces, St. Clair's Defeat.


It's interesting how the Indian wars always get somehow magically overlooked on "patriotism" days. I guess it's uncomfortable to remember that the main point of the U.S. military until the late 1800s was to subjugate Native Americans.
 
2014-05-26 07:55:54 AM
i.imgur.com
 
2014-05-26 07:56:03 AM

eiger: Ecobuckeye: I visited Fort Recovery to remember the biggest defeat of American forces, St. Clair's Defeat.

It's interesting how the Indian wars always get somehow magically overlooked on "patriotism" days. I guess it's uncomfortable to remember that the main point of the U.S. military until the late 1800s was to subjugate Native Americans.


The Lenape had already been moved west once (out of New Jersey and New York), so they were already getting tired of that shiat. But Blue Jacket got a hockey team named after him, so it's all good.
 
2014-05-26 07:57:00 AM
The biggest enemies before World War 2 were disease and infection.
 
2014-05-26 07:59:06 AM

eiger: Ecobuckeye: I visited Fort Recovery to remember the biggest defeat of American forces, St. Clair's Defeat.

It's interesting how the Indian wars always get somehow magically overlooked on "patriotism" days. I guess it's uncomfortable to remember that the main point of the U.S. military until the late 1800s was to subjugate Native Americans.


That was a big part of the Ta-Nehisi Coates article in Atlantic (the Fark thread on "The Case for Reparations capped out at about 850 comments).  One of the article's big points was, we embrace Washington and the Founding Fathers and all the good parts about American history, but slavery, Indian displacement/removal/genocide, violence committed against workers during Gilded Age labor disputes, sharecropping, and any number of other atrocities in our history?  We sweep those under the rug and say, "that was a long time ago."

/I would love for the Army to conduct a thorough investigation of every Medal of Honor issued during the Indian Wars and formally revoke a large portion of them, particularly the ones that were issued for things like soldiers finding natives hiding in gullies and wiping them out when one of them raised a gun to defend themselves.
 
2014-05-26 08:03:16 AM

UNC_Samurai: /I would love for the Army to conduct a thorough investigation of every Medal of Honor issued during the Indian Wars and formally revoke a large portion of them, particularly the ones that were issued for things like soldiers finding natives hiding in gullies and wiping them out when one of them raised a gun to defend themselves.


Not nitpicking, genuinely curious - for Mdeal of Honor recipients, do they keep detailed info on how/why they earned them that far back? I know for WW2 and beyond there's a significant amount of paper trails and the like, but was it more complicated back during 'The Indian Wars'?
 
2014-05-26 08:07:27 AM

Capo Del Bandito: You *do* know their active orders weren't 'shoot the Red skins on sight!" right?


Except when they were called out to slaughter natives who, having been enslaved and starved by local white settlers, committed the heinous crime of daring to attack settlers who were raping their girls.

/And we named forts and parks after their commander.
 
2014-05-26 08:09:31 AM

UNC_Samurai: Capo Del Bandito: You *do* know their active orders weren't 'shoot the Red skins on sight!" right?

Except when they were called out to slaughter natives who, having been enslaved and starved by local white settlers, committed the heinous crime of daring to attack settlers who were raping their girls.

/And we named forts and parks after their commander.


I'm not saying it didn't happen. I'm not a history revisionist. I'm talking about how often it did happen vs didn't happen. It's a long period of time. There were a lot of war crimes committed simply because there was no oversight. It was the 'Wild West" and all that. But i'm also saying it didn't happen on a daily basis over that 150 years or so.
 
2014-05-26 08:10:36 AM

Capo Del Bandito: UNC_Samurai: /I would love for the Army to conduct a thorough investigation of every Medal of Honor issued during the Indian Wars and formally revoke a large portion of them, particularly the ones that were issued for things like soldiers finding natives hiding in gullies and wiping them out when one of them raised a gun to defend themselves.

Not nitpicking, genuinely curious - for Mdeal of Honor recipients, do they keep detailed info on how/why they earned them that far back? I know for WW2 and beyond there's a significant amount of paper trails and the like, but was it more complicated back during 'The Indian Wars'?


The easiest way to go is talk to these folks:

http://www.cmohs.org/society-contact.php


Very, very good people and fantastic about helping out in research.
 
2014-05-26 08:12:17 AM
How about we honor them by not sending kids to die in pointless wars?
 
2014-05-26 08:12:38 AM

AtlanticCoast63: Capo Del Bandito: UNC_Samurai: /I would love for the Army to conduct a thorough investigation of every Medal of Honor issued during the Indian Wars and formally revoke a large portion of them, particularly the ones that were issued for things like soldiers finding natives hiding in gullies and wiping them out when one of them raised a gun to defend themselves.

Not nitpicking, genuinely curious - for Mdeal of Honor recipients, do they keep detailed info on how/why they earned them that far back? I know for WW2 and beyond there's a significant amount of paper trails and the like, but was it more complicated back during 'The Indian Wars'?

The easiest way to go is talk to these folks:

http://www.cmohs.org/society-contact.php


Very, very good people and fantastic about helping out in research.


Well you've given me a way to kill time this afternoon. Thank ye.
 
2014-05-26 08:13:48 AM

pippi longstocking: How about we honor them by not sending kids to die in pointless wars?


Yes yes, and the majority of the North thought the Civil War was a 'pointless war' until Lincoln's second term and in a way to 'rally the troops' he made it about freeing the slaves.

All wars are pointless until you put them in a historical context of 'good vs evil'. It all depends on the outcome.
 
2014-05-26 08:14:38 AM

Capo Del Bandito: UNC_Samurai: /I would love for the Army to conduct a thorough investigation of every Medal of Honor issued during the Indian Wars and formally revoke a large portion of them, particularly the ones that were issued for things like soldiers finding natives hiding in gullies and wiping them out when one of them raised a gun to defend themselves.

Not nitpicking, genuinely curious - for Mdeal of Honor recipients, do they keep detailed info on how/why they earned them that far back? I know for WW2 and beyond there's a significant amount of paper trails and the like, but was it more complicated back during 'The Indian Wars'?


There are citations, after-actions reports, and often additional reports, diary entries, and other pieces of writing.  A thorough investigation of every citation, by a team of a dozen researchers with an adequate budget would probably take 2-3 years.  I wrote up a preliminary budget proposal for a grad school class, and I ballparked it at just under $5 million, and based on my quick and very dirty sample size, you would likely find ~50% of citations would need to be very heavily reviewed, with ~20% of citations ultimately requiring revocation.

/It won't happen any time soon, neither the Army, the DoD, nor the Congresscritters would be real happy with the project.
 
2014-05-26 08:17:22 AM

Capo Del Bandito: pippi longstocking: How about we honor them by not sending kids to die in pointless wars?

Yes yes, and the majority of the North thought the Civil War was a 'pointless war' until Lincoln's second term and in a way to 'rally the troops' he made it about freeing the slaves.

All wars are pointless until you put them in a historical context of 'good vs evil'. It all depends on the outcome.


You're kinda off by a few centuries man. And by that logic the shiat that I just took will one day have a butterfly effect of getting us to Alpha Centauri. True story!
 
2014-05-26 08:18:41 AM

UNC_Samurai: I wrote up a preliminary budget proposal for a grad school class, and I ballparked it at just under $5 million, and based on my quick and very dirty sample size, you would likely find ~50% of citations would need to be very heavily reviewed, with ~20% of citations ultimately requiring revocation.


So....would it be possible to see this budget proposal?

I do recognize that a lot of historical figures get romanticized, but I'd be genuinely interested in checking out reality vs propaganda and the like.

Some folks like Dakota Meyer, http://badassoftheweek.com/index.cgi?archive=1&newcid=535195528147&cu r rcount=109  , deserve recognition, even if their exploits are overblown (can't say for sure, have to rely on paperwork from the front). But a 'fact check' of established history is quite an interesting idea.
 
2014-05-26 08:19:35 AM

pippi longstocking: You're kinda off by a few centuries man. And by that logic the shiat that I just took will one day have a butterfly effect of getting us to Alpha Centauri. True story!


...I used that as a point of reference, not a 'be all end all'. ALL wars are defined after the fact, or did you miss that in European History 101 at your community college?
 
2014-05-26 08:23:25 AM
I'm glad they mentioned the large number of civil war prisoner deaths. I had two die that way. One died when the prison she was in collapsed. The other was lynched by Union troopers.
 
2014-05-26 08:23:33 AM

Capo Del Bandito: UNC_Samurai: Capo Del Bandito: You *do* know their active orders weren't 'shoot the Red skins on sight!" right?

Except when they were called out to slaughter natives who, having been enslaved and starved by local white settlers, committed the heinous crime of daring to attack settlers who were raping their girls.

/And we named forts and parks after their commander.

I'm not saying it didn't happen. I'm not a history revisionist. I'm talking about how often it did happen vs didn't happen. It's a long period of time. There were a lot of war crimes committed simply because there was no oversight. It was the 'Wild West" and all that. But i'm also saying it didn't happen on a daily basis over that 150 years or so.


Daily basis, no - warfare in general is, endless stretches of interminate boredom interrupted by brief moments of sheer terror, and 19th century frontier warfare takes that to a whole other level.  But to a certain extent I'd contest the "Wild West" concept of lack of oversight.  American government and military apparatuses were there to protect settlers and pacify natives.  Other than your occasional irrational officer like Custer, no, they weren't actively going out and wiping out natives.  But policy towards natives was at best still more than just turning a blind eye to local-level decisions like Lyon against the Pomo, or Forsyth at Wounded Knee.  The federal government did practice a policy of escalation against western natives; for example, federal agents actively ignored policy about unauthorized settlement of Lakota territory.  The attitude seems to be, "to hell with them and if they complain, we'll shoot them."
 
2014-05-26 08:24:44 AM

Capo Del Bandito: AtlanticCoast63: Capo Del Bandito: UNC_Samurai: /I would love for the Army to conduct a thorough investigation of every Medal of Honor issued during the Indian Wars and formally revoke a large portion of them, particularly the ones that were issued for things like soldiers finding natives hiding in gullies and wiping them out when one of them raised a gun to defend themselves.

Not nitpicking, genuinely curious - for Mdeal of Honor recipients, do they keep detailed info on how/why they earned them that far back? I know for WW2 and beyond there's a significant amount of paper trails and the like, but was it more complicated back during 'The Indian Wars'?

The easiest way to go is talk to these folks:

http://www.cmohs.org/society-contact.php


Very, very good people and fantastic about helping out in research.

Well you've given me a way to kill time this afternoon. Thank ye.


As far as I know, the Medal of Honor was created at the time of the Civil War.  There were none awarded during the Indian Wars which really weren't wars.  No war was ever declared against an Indian tribe.
 
2014-05-26 08:25:34 AM

Mid_mo_mad_man: I'm glad they mentioned the large number of civil war prisoner deaths. I had two die that way. One died when the prison she was in collapsed. The other was lynched by Union troopers.


I had two ancestors
 
2014-05-26 08:27:59 AM

UNC_Samurai: The federal government did practice a policy of escalation against western natives; for example, federal agents actively ignored policy about unauthorized settlement of Lakota territory. The attitude seems to be, "to hell with them and if they complain, we'll shoot them."


Wouldn't that be more about budgets than restraints based on empathy/giving a shiat about the natives? Going to war with a local tribe, worrying about collateral damage vs the 'keeping the people safe' idea? Not to be a pessimistic type, but I imagine they only called for a full on troop movement would be when there was a public uprising/concern/complaint and/or if they felt borders and the like were truly threatened?

I imagine bean counters back then were more worried about expenditure than 'Manifest Destiny' on a regular basis.
 
2014-05-26 08:33:43 AM

pippi longstocking: How about we honor them by not sending kids to die in pointless wars?


Came to say this. I'll add that actually taking care of them when they return might be another step in the right direction.
 
2014-05-26 08:34:12 AM

Capo Del Bandito: UNC_Samurai: I wrote up a preliminary budget proposal for a grad school class, and I ballparked it at just under $5 million, and based on my quick and very dirty sample size, you would likely find ~50% of citations would need to be very heavily reviewed, with ~20% of citations ultimately requiring revocation.

So....would it be possible to see this budget proposal?

I do recognize that a lot of historical figures get romanticized, but I'd be genuinely interested in checking out reality vs propaganda and the like.

Some folks like Dakota Meyer, http://badassoftheweek.com/index.cgi?archive=1&newcid=535195528147&cu r rcount=109  , deserve recognition, even if their exploits are overblown (can't say for sure, have to rely on paperwork from the front). But a 'fact check' of established history is quite an interesting idea.


If it exists anywhere, it's in an archived hard drive somewhere on ECU's campus - once you graduate, they take away your shared drive.  The TL;DR was:

Hire someone with an MA or a PhD as the principal investigator, and someone with an MA as an assistant PI, at about $80k/year, then hire ten grad assistants for the summer at the going federal rate (which was about $17/hr in 2009).  Pay for not-terrible housing for the summer GAs.  Create an office inside National Archives-1 and have them turn the Indian Wars records upside down.  Same for any records the Smithsonian, CMOH Foundation, and a couple of other sources.  Once you have the set of records you know are questionable, you start going to the second- and third- tier sources; individual state and university libraries, tribal records, etc.
 
2014-05-26 08:36:44 AM

UNC_Samurai: Capo Del Bandito: UNC_Samurai: I wrote up a preliminary budget proposal for a grad school class, and I ballparked it at just under $5 million, and based on my quick and very dirty sample size, you would likely find ~50% of citations would need to be very heavily reviewed, with ~20% of citations ultimately requiring revocation.

So....would it be possible to see this budget proposal?

I do recognize that a lot of historical figures get romanticized, but I'd be genuinely interested in checking out reality vs propaganda and the like.

Some folks like Dakota Meyer, http://badassoftheweek.com/index.cgi?archive=1&newcid=535195528147&cu r rcount=109  , deserve recognition, even if their exploits are overblown (can't say for sure, have to rely on paperwork from the front). But a 'fact check' of established history is quite an interesting idea.

If it exists anywhere, it's in an archived hard drive somewhere on ECU's campus - once you graduate, they take away your shared drive.  The TL;DR was:

Hire someone with an MA or a PhD as the principal investigator, and someone with an MA as an assistant PI, at about $80k/year, then hire ten grad assistants for the summer at the going federal rate (which was about $17/hr in 2009).  Pay for not-terrible housing for the summer GAs.  Create an office inside National Archives-1 and have them turn the Indian Wars records upside down.  Same for any records the Smithsonian, CMOH Foundation, and a couple of other sources.  Once you have the set of records you know are questionable, you start going to the second- and third- tier sources; individual state and university libraries, tribal records, etc.


Seems reasonable, rational even. Why continue to recognize something that has been twisted/turned in the wind?

Though if I remember right, the government has a problem admitting it made a mistake on a one on one level like that:

"Oh we praised the actions of a guy who executed 10 prisoners of war? Our bad" doesn't seem likely.
 
2014-05-26 08:38:37 AM

Capo Del Bandito: UNC_Samurai: The federal government did practice a policy of escalation against western natives; for example, federal agents actively ignored policy about unauthorized settlement of Lakota territory. The attitude seems to be, "to hell with them and if they complain, we'll shoot them."

Wouldn't that be more about budgets than restraints based on empathy/giving a shiat about the natives? Going to war with a local tribe, worrying about collateral damage vs the 'keeping the people safe' idea? Not to be a pessimistic type, but I imagine they only called for a full on troop movement would be when there was a public uprising/concern/complaint and/or if they felt borders and the like were truly threatened?

I imagine bean counters back then were more worried about expenditure than 'Manifest Destiny' on a regular basis.


That pragmatism is very easy when the prevailing attitudes of the time considered natives as a lesser type of human being - "noble savage" and all that.

/I really enjoy discussing history on Fark without a flame war, but unfortunately I have to head out and work on some much-less-depressing history.  I have some work to do on my baseball museum exhibit before the local team starts their season today.  Thanks for the conversation, I might be back early enough to jump back in later.
 
2014-05-26 08:38:53 AM

ghare: Capo Del Bandito: ghare: I smell a chickenhawk

What does me saying apply historical perspective to an argument have to do with child predators?

Look, I get that you're from FL and that comes with the traditional 'FARK treats you like a retard' bit but could you come up with a counterpoint instead of name calling? You'd do your point well to think instead of name calling.depderpderp
 Ah, so you ARE a chickenhawk. Figures. Go away, boy.


bwok bwok, chicken chicken
bwok bwok, chicken hawks
bwok bwok, chicken chicken
bwok bwok, chicken hawks

bald-head skally-wag
ain't got no hair in back
gelled up weaved up
yo hair is messed up
need to get bout' a hustle mission
get up on loot run to beautican
run game until the game is gravy
that don't mean spend cheese fa tha baby
(bwok bwok) on a stalk stalk for a bootleg
(bwok bwok) pretty walk walk givin out head
ain't a thang eat a chicken wang
got some gold teeth
at da club tryin ta shake that thang
tryin ta get piece
chicken chicken always into some dumb shiat
shuolda paid ya light bill
you bought a outfit
stay at ya mammy house
and keep a smart mouth
its Project Memphis Tenn represent tha south
so pass tha dro-dro and we gone stay tickin
full of that mo mo holla at a chicken

bwok bwok, chicken chicken
bwok bwok, chicken hawks
bwok bwok, chicken chicken
bwok bwok, chicken hawks
 
2014-05-26 08:41:30 AM
Last week I got to tour the caves in Valkenburg, and plain as day, saw my grandfathers signature there... made me super happy. That said... honor the families of the dead guys, not just the soldiers, marines, sailors, and airmen... while dying is hard, explaining to a kid that his dad is dead is harder. Families behind soldiers cheer, stress, move, do logistics, and grieve, all behind the scenes, so servicemembers can do their work.
 
2014-05-26 08:43:09 AM

Capo Del Bandito: UNC_Samurai: Capo Del Bandito: You *do* know their active orders weren't 'shoot the Red skins on sight!" right?

Except when they were called out to slaughter natives who, having been enslaved and starved by local white settlers, committed the heinous crime of daring to attack settlers who were raping their girls.

/And we named forts and parks after their commander.

I'm not saying it didn't happen. I'm not a history revisionist. I'm talking about how often it did happen vs didn't happen. It's a long period of time. There were a lot of war crimes committed simply because there was no oversight. It was the 'Wild West" and all that. But i'm also saying it didn't happen on a daily basis over that 150 years or so.


I hate to break this to you, but "Indians" or "Red Skins" were not considered people back then... they were treated worse than the slaves were... the slaves were at least property and had value to people, the Native Americans however were nothing more than a dangerous annoyance lower than dogs to people at that time, so yes, it was a daily occurrence, and likely would not be documented in much the same was we do not document every single mosquito will kill that bites us.

/people are cruel by nature, and when there is no oversight and it is a crowd mentality, people are monsters.
 
2014-05-26 08:47:12 AM
Click here for this one amazing trick to learning the secret of America's top 10 deadliest wars!
 
2014-05-26 08:47:58 AM

Capo Del Bandito: pippi longstocking: You're kinda off by a few centuries man. And by that logic the shiat that I just took will one day have a butterfly effect of getting us to Alpha Centauri. True story!

...I used that as a point of reference, not a 'be all end all'. ALL wars are defined after the fact, or did you miss that in European History 101 at your community college?


And my point is you can look at anything in the way you want to see it. Or did you miss the common sense section at the Ad hominem 101 class?
 
2014-05-26 08:51:02 AM
As an ex-combat vet, and a disabled one at that, I always like to point out on this day not to thank me on May 26th. Any other day is fine, but today is about the fallen vets. There's over 800,000 of them, over 1.3 million if you count those who made the ultimate sacrifice while dying of things, like dysentery, for  their country. Don't thank living vets for that.

Now, I realize many don't know any fallen vets, so tend to bring up friends or family that were the fortunate vets that came home, some more fortunate than others - they still came back. We have our own day. Today isn't about that.

Today is about the fallen ones. Really, that is what this day is about. It can be uncomfortable, but it's necessary. A lot of times death in combat happens to people doing incredibly ordinary uninteresting tasks - think about these guys just one time today between beers - it's not a wake, it's a reflective celebration.

I know using today to thank a vet for their service is a good intention, but you unintentionally can fuel a lot of survivor guilt by thanking and dredging up old memories. A nice quiet reflective beer is all that is needed.

So, right now, spend 5 seconds of this day to use the internet look up a fallen vet - and enjoy the rest of it.
 
2014-05-26 09:06:32 AM
My father was a B17 navigator/bomber in ww2 and artillery on the ground in Korea and Viet Nam. Resides in Arlington today. Refused to let me enlist in 69, made me go to college instead. I have his journals from the battles he engaged in. Proud he was my father.
 
2014-05-26 09:08:32 AM
What's with all the Memorial Day hate this year? I don't remember seeing anything like it; I see all over Facebook "This day is not about barbecues, this is about crying over dead soldiers!" Now, I'm not trying to be crude here; I've got several friends and family who are retired and active duty; but isn't the best way to remember their sacrifice by celebrating our freedom?
 
2014-05-26 09:10:38 AM
I see the Zinnians are up early this morning.

/Here's to all the men and women who didn't come home.
 
2014-05-26 09:11:20 AM

HindiDiscoMonster: Capo Del Bandito: UNC_Samurai: Capo Del Bandito: You *do* know their active orders weren't 'shoot the Red skins on sight!" right?

Except when they were called out to slaughter natives who, having been enslaved and starved by local white settlers, committed the heinous crime of daring to attack settlers who were raping their girls.

/And we named forts and parks after their commander.

I'm not saying it didn't happen. I'm not a history revisionist. I'm talking about how often it did happen vs didn't happen. It's a long period of time. There were a lot of war crimes committed simply because there was no oversight. It was the 'Wild West" and all that. But i'm also saying it didn't happen on a daily basis over that 150 years or so.

I hate to break this to you, but "Indians" or "Red Skins" were not considered people back then... they were treated worse than the slaves were... the slaves were at least property and had value to people, the Native Americans however were nothing more than a dangerous annoyance lower than dogs to people at that time, so yes, it was a daily occurrence, and likely would not be documented in much the same was we do not document every single mosquito will kill that bites us.

/people are cruel by nature, and when there is no oversight and it is a crowd mentality, people are monsters.


Every single nation on earth has unfortunate events in the past. Powerful people tend to be asses and trample the weak. It's not just an American thing. We as a country gain nothing from dwelling on it.
 
2014-05-26 09:20:06 AM
Leave it to the Fark Progressives to defile the day meant to honor those who made the ultimate sacrifice.

/without their efforts you might not have the ability to sound like a tool on the interwebs
 
2014-05-26 09:32:59 AM
Sadly my great grandfather fought in the 11th most deadliest of the US's wars.  Guess we'll start a burn barrel to purge his memory.
 
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