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(BusinessWeek)   Going above and beyond at your job is irrelevant and actually impresses no one that matters   (businessweek.com) divider line 110
    More: PSA, businesses, behavioral scientist  
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7056 clicks; posted to Main » on 25 May 2014 at 10:23 PM (18 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-05-25 09:26:45 PM
This is something that project management professionals have actually known for decades. It's kind of a corollary of Parkinson's Law.

If you are asked to give an estimate of the time needed to complete a project/task, then if it's anything other than a simple linear project, other phases will be dependent on the outcome of your work. If you're late, you hold things up. But if you're early, then you create an even bigger problem, since no one wants you to just sit idle, but you can't easily be assigned to other projects either.
 
2014-05-25 10:20:48 PM
No shiat. :-/

/Recovering workaholic.
 
2014-05-25 10:23:58 PM
Don't be proactive. Be more like sheep.
 
2014-05-25 10:25:37 PM
I don't want you going above and beyond, but damn well give me more than "I just work here."
 
2014-05-25 10:32:18 PM
i291.photobucket.com
 
2014-05-25 10:32:54 PM
Keep to the code.  Take what you can.  Give nothing back.
 
2014-05-25 10:33:07 PM

wildcardjack: I don't want you going above and beyond, but damn well give me more than "I just work here."


Then pay me more than a mere pittance
 
2014-05-25 10:34:30 PM

AirForceVet: No shiat. :-/

/Recovering workaholic.


I used to put everything I had into my work, not just long hours, but my spirit, my intellect, my everything.  It only took me
  about 30 years to realize that didn't actually get you very far.  Oh sure, you'd get some promotions, and a bit more
  money along the way.  But the real "profits" from your sweat and tears you'd never see, you'd never benefit from.
  Corporations exist to make shiatloads of money for their shareholders.   A well-functioning high-tech company
  will seek to hire the brightest/best/most-"productive", and then carefully manipulate things to maximize outcomes
  *for the shareholders*, while minimizing the required *inputs* into the labor that produces the maximized
  shareholder outcomes.

You do yourself *NO* favors by giving corporations your soul.  NONE.  Oh, it may *look* like a win-win situation
  for a decade or two, but in the end, they'll fark you in the ass with a chimney brush.  Individual workers are
  simply parts of a *machine* whose output is "shareholder value".

/35 years in high-tech, empty-shell veteran of the Nortel collapse
//Working currently for a corporation I care *nothing* about.  Once I can get a decent consulting gig setup, I'm so very
  outta there (and corporate slaving in general).
 
2014-05-25 10:34:38 PM
Meh my customers appreciate the extra attention to detail I give and besides I enjoy doing what I do, getting paid is just a bonus
 
2014-05-25 10:35:36 PM

Aar1012: wildcardjack: I don't want you going above and beyond, but damn well give me more than "I just work here."

Then pay me more than a mere pittance


Stop working for pittances.
 
2014-05-25 10:35:52 PM

Aar1012: wildcardjack: I don't want you going above and beyond, but damn well give me more than "I just work here."

Then pay me more than a mere pittance


And stop paying me for 40 hours, then expecting me to work 60, minimum. And don't even get me started on vacations.
 
2014-05-25 10:36:12 PM
Is this a Ric Romero piece?  Feels like a Romero piece.
 
2014-05-25 10:37:17 PM
And rule #2 is: It's not the amount of work that you do, it's the amount that you're seen to do...
 
2014-05-25 10:38:51 PM
It doesn't matter how well you do your job, it only matters that they "like" you.
 
2014-05-25 10:39:35 PM

wildcardjack: Aar1012: wildcardjack: I don't want you going above and beyond, but damn well give me more than "I just work here."

Then pay me more than a mere pittance

Stop working for pittances.


But we've looked at what is the going standard in the industry and, even though we made huge gains in our profit magins the past year, we can't give you a raise beyond half of one percent.

Also, we're scaling back on your vacation time and upping the cost of your insurance
 
2014-05-25 10:42:41 PM
people.virginia.edu tag was sleeping on the job.
 
2014-05-25 10:43:11 PM

patchvonbraun: AirForceVet: No shiat. :-/

/Recovering workaholic.

I used to put everything I had into my work, not just long hours, but my spirit, my intellect, my everything.  It only took me
  about 30 years to realize that didn't actually get you very far.  Oh sure, you'd get some promotions, and a bit more
  money along the way.  But the real "profits" from your sweat and tears you'd never see, you'd never benefit from.
  Corporations exist to make shiatloads of money for their shareholders.   A well-functioning high-tech company
  will seek to hire the brightest/best/most-"productive", and then carefully manipulate things to maximize outcomes
  *for the shareholders*, while minimizing the required *inputs* into the labor that produces the maximized
  shareholder outcomes.

You do yourself *NO* favors by giving corporations your soul.  NONE.  Oh, it may *look* like a win-win situation
  for a decade or two, but in the end, they'll fark you in the ass with a chimney brush.  Individual workers are
  simply parts of a *machine* whose output is "shareholder value".

/35 years in high-tech, empty-shell veteran of the Nortel collapse
//Working currently for a corporation I care *nothing* about.  Once I can get a decent consulting gig setup, I'm so very
  outta there (and corporate slaving in general).


Have to ask, what would you have done differently if you got do it all over again?

Quit and do a startup? Develop other things besides work?
 
2014-05-25 10:43:23 PM

whistleridge: This is something that project management professionals have actually known for decades. It's kind of a corollary of Parkinson's Law.

If you are asked to give an estimate of the time needed to complete a project/task, then if it's anything other than a simple linear project, other phases will be dependent on the outcome of your work. If you're late, you hold things up. But if you're early, then you create an even bigger problem, since no one wants you to just sit idle, but you can't easily be assigned to other projects either.


Guess I'm in the right business and the right market.

There's a bunch of projects I'd love to see get done yesterday, but there's only so many hours in a day and pushing the staff to get it done just backfires.  I only have a few deadlines from above me and I was able to meet them, so they don't care about when the rest of the projects get completed, so long as the end users are happy.
 
2014-05-25 10:43:27 PM
Man, you guys really need to re-think your professional lives.

I work in Libraries.  It's the best job ever.  My Board of Directors notices when I go above and beyond, and my contract has a sliding scale for my yearly raises built in, based on merit.  The difference between Meets and Exceeds is 2%.  I get 5 weeks a year of leave in addition to 13 holidays.  They insist that I take it.

I don't work for profits - I work to better the lives of our residents.  I know we make a positive difference every day.  I love what I do.  I consistently exceed because I enjoy it, not because I'm scared not to.
 
2014-05-25 10:43:36 PM
Huh.  Actually, I DO value employees that go above and beyond.

Basically my approach is this.  People who can't deliver I replace.  Everyone else gets judged based on how good a job they do.

I know who my high performers are, and I make sure they are taken care of.   It's worked for me so far.
 
2014-05-25 10:44:15 PM
yeah ok.

Take pride in your work. Maybe your right and management will not give a fark, but you will have the satisfaction of know you did it.

I constantly take my projects to another level, usually adding in something that *I* want to learn more about and add a bit of WOW factor in. It makes the company look good and, by extension, me look good (especially since I have 100% ownership of the project and I do 99% of the presenting to the client).

But year, go on being a drone and feeling worthless if you want to...
 
2014-05-25 10:45:14 PM
As the manager of a smallish team (~25 folks), what I value most is someone who can consistently and accurately estimate their tasks. Extraordinary effort is nice & all, but it usually means that there was some hole in the planning in the first place.
 
2014-05-25 10:45:20 PM
Step 1) get a very well defined job descriptions
Step 2) get paid more for doing anything you're requested outside of that description
 
2014-05-25 10:45:28 PM
Which comes from a network, website, mayor, and presidential hopeful who was an over-achiever his entire life - a billionaire, Michael Bloomberg.

Complete and total liberal dogma, red meat to the hicks - "Hard work doesn't matter. Be a slacker and get millions. Society owes you a huge check each month for sitting on your tail and complaining on the Internet."

Why is he telling you this?

Michael cared about his job.
 
2014-05-25 10:45:33 PM
Starting to feel the squeeze at my work after six developers (the best six) resigned in the last few months.

We were recently bought by a larger company but most of the dev resignations happened before then.

Starting to feel very unhappy at work as I am thrown around between multiple projects and am unable to give each 100%. Management structure largely seems oblivious to developer concerns except when there is some silver bullet product we can buy that will supposedly fix our problems.

Should I kill myself now or wait until later.

/first day back after a week off and feel no better
 
2014-05-25 10:47:42 PM

fnordest: It doesn't matter how well you do your job, it only matters that they "like" you.


I read somewhere that after a job interview, the interviewer didn't remember much of what they talked about. The only thing they distinctly remember is if they liked the person or not.
 
2014-05-25 10:47:55 PM
When I was a young keener, one day I fell on the way to work, tearing my MCL, ACL and cartilage.

A woman fished me out of the puddle I was lying in and offered to drive me to the hospital. I said no, I have to get to work. I had to get a job out that day.

I literally, shiat you not, hobbled on one leg at work, for 2 hours, printing a stupid package to get it out in time.

They never recognized it, probably called me a farking idiot behind my back.

After 6 months of being crippled and a few more years of getting my good attitude crushed out of me, I finally started getting raises. I remember one raise in particular came after I threatened to beat a project manager to death in front of the entire office.

I now spend my days surfing the net for twice what they paid me to hobble around on a shredded knee.

fark you capitalism, from now on I drink your blood and spit in your face.
 
2014-05-25 10:48:28 PM

SomeAmerican: Huh.  Actually, I DO value employees that go above and beyond.

Basically my approach is this.  People who can't deliver I replace.  Everyone else gets judged based on how good a job they do.

I know who my high performers are, and I make sure they are taken care of.   It's worked for me so far.


Are you in a small business? In which case, great job! You've bucked the trend and give great opportunity.

Are you in a mind-numbing corporate position? Congratulations, you're a middle manager that'll get farked the second something bad happens or the CEO needs a new yacht.
 
2014-05-25 10:48:36 PM

calufrax: And rule #2 is: It's not the amount of work that you do, it's the amount that you're seen to do...


This,,

fnordest: It doesn't matter how well you do your job, it only matters that they "like" you.


That...
 
2014-05-25 10:50:51 PM
If you go "above and beyond" what's expected then people will just find a way to take advantage of it.

I used to show up for work about 30-40 minutes early in a salaried position for 3-4 years just to get a quiet jump-start on my day and catch up with any late emails or take early morning deliveries for people mostly in other departments.  Never really got much thanks for it if ever.

When I realized that any additional income I contributed to or opportunities I created didn't benefit me in the least I stopped coming in early.  Then I got 2-3 comments a day about shiat that normally got done before anyone else even got in to the office.  "Don't you usually do that?"  Meh, yeah I used to.
 
2014-05-25 10:51:15 PM

SomeAmerican: Huh.  Actually, I DO value employees that go above and beyond.

Basically my approach is this.  People who can't deliver I replace.  Everyone else gets judged based on how good a job they do.

I know who my high performers are, and I make sure they are taken care of.   It's worked for me so far.


The article is saying something else.
- If you promise to do something, just do only what you promised. Going above and beyond doesn't help.
- If you think you can go above and beyond, don't promise. Surprise.

So, the employees that don't promise to do anything but surprise you will be valued higher than those who promise something but then deliver something above and beyond.

If someone promises something and doesn't deliver, then of course, it's not good. But, that's not what the article is talking about.
 
2014-05-25 10:51:17 PM
Yep.
So instead enforce your boundaries. At least you get some respect when you do that.
 
2014-05-25 10:52:12 PM

Benevolent Misanthrope: I work in Libraries


Hope you're near retirement.... and yes, terrified of pussy lightning. It haunts me.
 
NFA [TotalFark]
2014-05-25 10:54:10 PM
"Going above and beyond at your job is irrelevant and actually impresses no one that matters "

Bullshiat, I just gave a $1000 cash award to an employee who went above and beyond.
 
2014-05-25 10:54:23 PM

Piizzadude: yeah ok.

Take pride in your work. Maybe your right and management will not give a fark, but you will have the satisfaction of know you did it.

I constantly take my projects to another level, usually adding in something that *I* want to learn more about and add a bit of WOW factor in. It makes the company look good and, by extension, me look good (especially since I have 100% ownership of the project and I do 99% of the presenting to the client).

But year, go on being a drone and feeling worthless if you want to...


But year.
 
2014-05-25 10:54:33 PM

enry: Guess I'm in the right business and the right market.

There's a bunch of projects I'd love to see get done yesterday, but there's only so many hours in a day and pushing the staff to get it done just backfires.  I only have a few deadlines from above me and I was able to meet them, so they don't care about when the rest of the projects get completed, so long as the end users are happy.


Some industries it matters more, others less.

If you push some code out quicker than expected, sweet - you can get started on the next bit of badly needed code. If George R.R. Martin announces today that he finished  Winds of Winter, boom! The presses roll tomorrow, and we're all ecstatic.

But if you rush to finish the pilings of that bridge two weeks early, and the steel of the trusses hasn't even arrived yet, you either have to pay a crew to do nothing, or send them home and risk them getting snapped up by other projects. Or, if you push hard and get that iPhone ready 3 months early, all you're doing is increasing the risk of leaks, because the pre-coordinated media hoopla isn't going to be able to kick off any sooner.

Timing matters, and often, being more than about 5% under time and/or under budget is actually as bad or even worse than being 5% over. Giving your all is great and all, but...if all extra effort is going to get you is you working super hard on a project whose timeline isn't going to change either way...

My philosophy has always been, people who work extra hard are simply saying to the company  I place so little value on my time that I give it away for free, and so should you. If you want my time, you can damn well pay for it. And i you want more than 40 hours, you pay 1.5 times as much. Over 50, it's double time. Over 60, triple time. And you don't have enough to pay me for more than 70. I value my life, my family, and my free time faaaaaar more than I will EVER value whatever widget or service it is that you're trying to return a profit on for your shareholders/partners.
 
2014-05-25 10:54:41 PM

Thanks for the Meme-ries: [i291.photobucket.com image 420x294]


sad but true, I just had to hang my own shingle to feed the kiddies and the bank. I think iran had the right idea about corrupt bankers, hang them.
 
2014-05-25 10:54:56 PM

patchvonbraun: AirForceVet: No shiat. :-/

/Recovering workaholic.

I used to put everything I had into my work, not just long hours, but my spirit, my intellect, my everything.  It only took me
  about 30 years to realize that didn't actually get you very far.  Oh sure, you'd get some promotions, and a bit more
  money along the way.  But the real "profits" from your sweat and tears you'd never see, you'd never benefit from.
  Corporations exist to make shiatloads of money for their shareholders.   A well-functioning high-tech company
  will seek to hire the brightest/best/most-"productive", and then carefully manipulate things to maximize outcomes
  *for the shareholders*, while minimizing the required *inputs* into the labor that produces the maximized
  shareholder outcomes.

You do yourself *NO* favors by giving corporations your soul.  NONE.  Oh, it may *look* like a win-win situation
  for a decade or two, but in the end, they'll fark you in the ass with a chimney brush.  Individual workers are
  simply parts of a *machine* whose output is "shareholder value".

/35 years in high-tech, empty-shell veteran of the Nortel collapse
//Working currently for a corporation I care *nothing* about.  Once I can get a decent consulting gig setup, I'm so very
  outta there (and corporate slaving in general).


As a young person, I'm taking the opposite approach in the short term.

I needed a big boy job and some big boy money. Being an unexpected $250 expense away from homelessness for 3 years after graduation got me paranoid and I save hard. Right now, I'm absolutely busting my butt, snatching up extra work (and hours) for more money. It's paid off and two promotions later, I'm extremely happy and picked up a LOT of legal certifications for auto financing. That's building my resume.

My current gig isn't difficult, but I don't plan on staying here forever. I want the experience, the money, and the knowledge so I can jump when I'm ready (5-7 years seems like a good timeline).
 
2014-05-25 10:55:49 PM
I care, subby.  I care.

Oh right, no one that matters.
 
2014-05-25 10:56:09 PM
Hell, even "doing a good job" doesn't seem to impress most folks, anymore.  They all seem to expect underperformance.
 
2014-05-25 10:58:40 PM

StoPPeRmobile: Piizzadude: yeah ok.

Take pride in your work. Maybe your right and management will not give a fark, but you will have the satisfaction of know you did it.

I constantly take my projects to another level, usually adding in something that *I* want to learn more about and add a bit of WOW factor in. It makes the company look good and, by extension, me look good (especially since I have 100% ownership of the project and I do 99% of the presenting to the client).

But year, But Yeah, go on being a drone and feeling worthless if you want to...

But year.


FTFM, TY
 
2014-05-25 10:59:10 PM
A perfectly-mopped row of booths is its own reward
 
2014-05-25 10:59:37 PM

Hop-Frog: Hell, even "doing a good job" doesn't seem to impress most folks, anymore.  They all seem to expect underperformance.


They expect better when you've done beyond expectations.
 
2014-05-25 11:01:02 PM
If you're working for a company that has more than a few hundred employees or is publicly traded, yes, you're likely wasting your time, or at the very least, seen as an asskisser, and even the guy whose ass you're kissing knows what an easily replaceable tool you are. Work for a smaller company, or if your'e capable and in the right field, start your own small business.

Most companies, while saying "work as hard as you can because it is the right thing to do, don't do it for the paycheck" have no problem reaping the benefits of your hard work. A manager who says that to you is essentially saying "you are an easily replaceable tool, and I want to squeeze every ounce of life out of you so I can buy a new suit with the raise I got for having such broken, soulless employees."
 
2014-05-25 11:01:43 PM

Piizzadude: StoPPeRmobile: Piizzadude: yeah ok.

Take pride in your work. Maybe your right and management will not give a fark, but you will have the satisfaction of know you did it.

I constantly take my projects to another level, usually adding in something that *I* want to learn more about and add a bit of WOW factor in. It makes the company look good and, by extension, me look good (especially since I have 100% ownership of the project and I do 99% of the presenting to the client).

But year, But Yeah, go on being a drone and feeling worthless if you want to...

But year.

FTFM, TY


Lulz
 
2014-05-25 11:02:11 PM
I'm kind of in line with piizzadude.   Going above and beyond, is something I do as much for myself as for the clients.  I used to do it for managers I respected, and those managers I wanted to respect ME.  And it did help around raise-requesting negotiations time, to pull out a sheaf of happy client commendations I could point to.  For every "oh sheet" moment you have during the year, you need to store up about three "Atta-boys". Four, if you're gunning for a promotion, and not just a raise.  But I would agree, the effort tends to plateau after a decade on the job, and at that point, if you're doing it like a rockstar, and there's no further place to ascend at the particular workplace, it's really for yourself.

And that's not a bad thing. That sense of competence and mastery helps carry me thru the bad days when I don't feel otherwise valued or appreciated. It holds up my dignity and self-worth. The reputation you build in a workplace sticks a long time, so even after you may throttle-back your level of effort, people think of you as the "go-to guy" for the tough, challenging stuff.

I can't speak for you, dear reader, but personally, if I slack off too long at work, I get antsy and uncomfortable, i don;t rally *need* a middle-manager to run tabs on me and keep me from malingering, because the breaks I take are very short, during actual down-time.  If I'm unoccupied too long, I get stir-crazy and go looking for stuff to do, or do some creative brainstorming or thinking about the future needs of the compay and customers, and what we need to do now to be ready for that future.

I DO know people who don't give a fark and are just there to earn a check and  GTFO every day as soon as possible.   Honestly, I don't know how that's sustainable over long periods. They must have a HELL of a second life at home or with hobbies or a loved one or something that keeps them going all day while they punch the clock.   I have those things too, DGMW, but my work is still a large part of my identity, and as such, I put effort into it that pleases myself and makes me feel better than I am.  Asking me to not care about my job is like asking me to deliberately seek self-injury. It just don't compute.

If management wants to look at my superior ability and performance as me foolishly being ripped-off and wasting effort, well, that just means they really have no idea what motivates men, or what makes an organization great.
 
2014-05-25 11:02:56 PM

Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: patchvonbraun: AirForceVet: No shiat. :-/

/Recovering workaholic.

I used to put everything I had into my work, not just long hours, but my spirit, my intellect, my everything.  It only took me
  about 30 years to realize that didn't actually get you very far.  Oh sure, you'd get some promotions, and a bit more
  money along the way.  But the real "profits" from your sweat and tears you'd never see, you'd never benefit from.
  Corporations exist to make shiatloads of money for their shareholders.   A well-functioning high-tech company
  will seek to hire the brightest/best/most-"productive", and then carefully manipulate things to maximize outcomes
  *for the shareholders*, while minimizing the required *inputs* into the labor that produces the maximized
  shareholder outcomes.

You do yourself *NO* favors by giving corporations your soul.  NONE.  Oh, it may *look* like a win-win situation
  for a decade or two, but in the end, they'll fark you in the ass with a chimney brush.  Individual workers are
  simply parts of a *machine* whose output is "shareholder value".

/35 years in high-tech, empty-shell veteran of the Nortel collapse
//Working currently for a corporation I care *nothing* about.  Once I can get a decent consulting gig setup, I'm so very
  outta there (and corporate slaving in general).

As a young person, I'm taking the opposite approach in the short term.

I needed a big boy job and some big boy money. Being an unexpected $250 expense away from homelessness for 3 years after graduation got me paranoid and I save hard. Right now, I'm absolutely busting my butt, snatching up extra work (and hours) for more money. It's paid off and two promotions later, I'm extremely happy and picked up a LOT of legal certifications for auto financing. That's building my resume.

My current gig isn't difficult, but I don't plan on staying here forever. I want the experience, the money, and the knowledge so I can jump when I'm ready (5-7 years seems like a good timeline).


OT? Not a real job.

/kidding
 
2014-05-25 11:05:03 PM

mr0x: patchvonbraun: AirForceVet: No shiat. :-/

/Recovering workaholic.

I used to put everything I had into my work, not just long hours, but my spirit, my intellect, my everything.  It only took me
  about 30 years to realize that didn't actually get you very far.  Oh sure, you'd get some promotions, and a bit more
  money along the way.  But the real "profits" from your sweat and tears you'd never see, you'd never benefit from.
  Corporations exist to make shiatloads of money for their shareholders.   A well-functioning high-tech company
  will seek to hire the brightest/best/most-"productive", and then carefully manipulate things to maximize outcomes
  *for the shareholders*, while minimizing the required *inputs* into the labor that produces the maximized
  shareholder outcomes.

You do yourself *NO* favors by giving corporations your soul.  NONE.  Oh, it may *look* like a win-win situation
  for a decade or two, but in the end, they'll fark you in the ass with a chimney brush.  Individual workers are
  simply parts of a *machine* whose output is "shareholder value".

/35 years in high-tech, empty-shell veteran of the Nortel collapse
//Working currently for a corporation I care *nothing* about.  Once I can get a decent consulting gig setup, I'm so very
  outta there (and corporate slaving in general).

Have to ask, what would you have done differently if you got do it all over again?

Quit and do a startup? Develop other things besides work?


I do development on the side, in support of small-scale science.  I should have simply done that from the very beginning, instead of having the epiphany later in life.  If I can, before I croak, contribute even slightly to the totality
of human knowledge, then I'll have done for mankind, and future generations, much, much, more than
"increasing shareholder value" ever could.   It's not a path that provides monetary riches, to be sure, but
it certainly allows one to live with oneself.

I have a bunch of patents to my name.  I"m proud of the intellectual effort that they represent.  But at the
end of the day they're pretty meaningless compared to some of my "science on the side" work that I've
done.
 
2014-05-25 11:06:54 PM

Suckmaster Burstingfoam: fark you capitalism, from now on I drink your blood and spit in your face.


Your name, this comment, so gratuitous. You are the GWAR of Fark.
 
2014-05-25 11:08:35 PM

Any Pie Left: I'm kind of in line with piizzadude.   Going above and beyond, is something I do as much for myself as for the clients.  I used to do it for managers I respected, and those managers I wanted to respect ME.  And it did help around raise-requesting negotiations time, to pull out a sheaf of happy client commendations I could point to.  For every "oh sheet" moment you have during the year, you need to store up about three "Atta-boys". Four, if you're gunning for a promotion, and not just a raise.  But I would agree, the effort tends to plateau after a decade on the job, and at that point, if you're doing it like a rockstar, and there's no further place to ascend at the particular workplace, it's really for yourself.

And that's not a bad thing. That sense of competence and mastery helps carry me thru the bad days when I don't feel otherwise valued or appreciated. It holds up my dignity and self-worth. The reputation you build in a workplace sticks a long time, so even after you may throttle-back your level of effort, people think of you as the "go-to guy" for the tough, challenging stuff.

I can't speak for you, dear reader, but personally, if I slack off too long at work, I get antsy and uncomfortable, i don;t rally *need* a middle-manager to run tabs on me and keep me from malingering, because the breaks I take are very short, during actual down-time.  If I'm unoccupied too long, I get stir-crazy and go looking for stuff to do, or do some creative brainstorming or thinking about the future needs of the compay and customers, and what we need to do now to be ready for that future.

I DO know people who don't give a fark and are just there to earn a check and  GTFO every day as soon as possible.   Honestly, I don't know how that's sustainable over long periods. They must have a HELL of a second life at home or with hobbies or a loved one or something that keeps them going all day while they punch the clock.   I have those things too, DGMW, but my work is still a large pa ...


*sigh*  Well said.  I need to find another job where every position above mine isn't filled by a family member of the owner.
 
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