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(YouTube)   Neil deGrasse Tyson describes Bill Gates' wealth in completely awesome, understandable terms. HINT: The lost money in Bill's couch cushions is probably greater than the net worth of most small nations   (youtube.com) divider line 34
    More: Obvious, Neil deGrasse, Bill Gates, lost money  
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2756 clicks; posted to Geek » on 23 May 2014 at 1:59 PM (30 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



34 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-05-23 12:27:35 PM  
Dang!
 
2014-05-23 12:35:14 PM  
billions and billions of wealth
 
2014-05-23 01:32:58 PM  
Well now, that puts things in perspective.
 
2014-05-23 01:37:02 PM  
And thats using degrasse tysons own not insignificant wealth as the metric.
 
2014-05-23 02:06:35 PM  
The day Bill Gates dies the skies will grow dark with $100 bills.
 
2014-05-23 02:07:04 PM  
Well then shouldn't small nations make something of worth?
 
2014-05-23 02:07:28 PM  
I normally don't like this guy, but that was a good stand-up bit.
 
2014-05-23 02:16:17 PM  
If small nations wanted billions of dollars, they should have invented Windows. Duh.
 
2014-05-23 02:32:07 PM  
Wake me when he's hilariously trolling unamusing white people looking for castles that cost less than an apartment in New York.
 
2014-05-23 02:36:58 PM  
Gary Gulman (comedian) addressed this in his special: "in this economy.
 
2014-05-23 02:37:23 PM  
Can we get a video tag on this?
 
2014-05-23 02:37:41 PM  
Funny bit, but it's always a fallacy to say that rich people actually have that much liquid capital just lying in a vault somewhere, like Scrooge's money bin. Most of their immense wealth is not cash but property, stocks, and holdings in various companies. And they couldn't liquidate it even if they wanted to. For instance, Bill just can't sell off all his MS stock today. You have any idea what kind of panic at the exchange that would cause? There are controls set in place, he has to declare how much he plans on selling off months in advance, so that investors and speculators can prepare. And these kinds of restrictions are in place for nearly everything he owns.

So just because a guy is worth billions of dollars does not mean he can spend billions of dollars.
 
2014-05-23 02:45:17 PM  

Ishkur: Funny bit, but it's always a fallacy to say that rich people actually have that much liquid capital just lying in a vault somewhere, like Scrooge's money bin. Most of their immense wealth is not cash but property, stocks, and holdings in various companies. And they couldn't liquidate it even if they wanted to. For instance, Bill just can't sell off all his MS stock today. You have any idea what kind of panic at the exchange that would cause? There are controls set in place, he has to declare how much he plans on selling off months in advance, so that investors and speculators can prepare. And these kinds of restrictions are in place for nearly everything he owns.

So just because a guy is worth billions of dollars does not mean he can spend billions of dollars.


You can't put logic and facts into a good hyperbole.
 
2014-05-23 02:56:23 PM  

Ishkur: So just because a guy is worth billions of dollars does not mean he can spend billions of dollars.


Not right away, but theoretically he probably could get that money in a few months. Which is more than most people can say for themselves.

Also, he could theoretically borrow a few billion dollars by putting up his stock or other property as collateral, and then spending that money. That might be faster, although I have no idea if that would also require some kind of filing with the SEC.
 
2014-05-23 03:04:43 PM  

Ishkur: So just because a guy is worth billions of dollars does not mean he can spend billions of dollars.


True, but to that point, virtually EVERYTHING that us poor slobs have to afford (housing, food, clothing, travel, education, healthcare expenses, and generally just living) is such a minute fraction of the liquid asset portion of his net worth, he's essentially just living for free.

He could blow $10,000 a day for life on giant foam hats and I'M NUMBER ONE fingers, pinwheels, and beer, and never make a teeny tiny dent in his folding money account.

PanicMan: Can we get a video tag on this?


YouTube source wasn't enough of a hint??
 
2014-05-23 03:07:06 PM  
Bill would probably pick up the $45K and buy 45,000 vaccinations for poor people with it.

/the basterd, how dare he not blow it on something frivolous
 
2014-05-23 03:14:01 PM  

markie_farkie: Ishkur: So just because a guy is worth billions of dollars does not mean he can spend billions of dollars.

True, but to that point, virtually EVERYTHING that us poor slobs have to afford (housing, food, clothing, travel, education, healthcare expenses, and generally just living) is such a minute fraction of the liquid asset portion of his net worth, he's essentially just living for free.

He could blow $10,000 a day for life on giant foam hats and I'M NUMBER ONE fingers, pinwheels, and beer, and never make a teeny tiny dent in his folding money account.

PanicMan: Can we get a video tag on this?

YouTube source wasn't enough of a hint??


On my phone it's greyed out and tiny font.
 
2014-05-23 03:17:56 PM  

Ishkur: Funny bit, but it's always a fallacy to say that rich people actually have that much liquid capital just lying in a vault somewhere, like Scrooge's money bin. Most of their immense wealth is not cash but property, stocks, and holdings in various companies. And they couldn't liquidate it even if they wanted to. For instance, Bill just can't sell off all his MS stock today. You have any idea what kind of panic at the exchange that would cause? There are controls set in place, he has to declare how much he plans on selling off months in advance, so that investors and speculators can prepare. And these kinds of restrictions are in place for nearly everything he owns.

So just because a guy is worth billions of dollars does not mean he can spend billions of dollars.


He can borrow against it.
 
2014-05-23 03:22:54 PM  

PanicMan: On my phone it's greyed out and tiny font.


Ah ok.. Time to call Bill and ask for a better phone then!  I think he can spot you!
 
2014-05-23 03:29:47 PM  

markie_farkie: True, but to that point, virtually EVERYTHING that us poor slobs have to afford (housing, food, clothing, travel, education, healthcare expenses, and generally just living) is such a minute fraction of the liquid asset portion of his net worth, he's essentially just living for free.


I have no hard or fast numbers, but I would estimate that the amount of petty cash that most billionaires have ready access to on any given day is probably somewhere in the low millions (more than 1, less than 10). There's no common consumer good on the planet that expensive, so they don't need anything more than that.

And being highly public figures means they also have access to "virtual" money -- free comps and VIP services at their favorite country clubs and such. Which means they need even less money for daily excursions. They probably haven't had to pay at a restaurant in years.
 
2014-05-23 03:31:12 PM  
I don't begrudge Gates his billions. So far, he's been pretty good about spending large amounts of it on trying to make the world just a little better.

Now if he'd only regain control of Microsoft just long enough to kill Windows 8...
 
2014-05-23 03:49:55 PM  
Based on the percentage of net worth, CNN Money 2014 puts the average net worth of someone 35-44 years old in the US at $51,575. Let's call it $52k in Gates' eyes.

For a 35-44 year old with a net worth of 52k to purchase a bottle of Dr. Pepper at a Citgo station (let's say it cost $1.35), it would equate to about 0.000026% of their net worth.

0.000026% of Bill Gates' fortune is around two million dollars.

So for Bill Gates, dropping two million will affect his net worth about as much as buying a bottle of pop would for the average person of my age in America.
 
2014-05-23 04:00:24 PM  

Ishkur: markie_farkie: True, but to that point, virtually EVERYTHING that us poor slobs have to afford (housing, food, clothing, travel, education, healthcare expenses, and generally just living) is such a minute fraction of the liquid asset portion of his net worth, he's essentially just living for free.

I have no hard or fast numbers, but I would estimate that the amount of petty cash that most billionaires have ready access to on any given day is probably somewhere in the low millions (more than 1, less than 10). There's no common consumer good on the planet that expensive, so they don't need anything more than that.

And being highly public figures means they also have access to "virtual" money -- free comps and VIP services at their favorite country clubs and such. Which means they need even less money for daily excursions. They probably haven't had to pay at a restaurant in years.


If they have shares in a company they use to slough off the commission (Warren Buffett does this, as his filing to the SEC shows), those shares can be sold at any time as either a way to get revenue to buy into other companies or for the cash. Those shares can be considered a liquid asset with a reliable store of value.
 
2014-05-23 04:11:39 PM  
I found about 2 bucks in change when they took out the old vending machines yesterday, that was cool but there is a quarter glued to the floor.
 
2014-05-23 04:14:08 PM  

Ishkur: Funny bit, but it's always a fallacy to say that rich people actually have that much liquid capital just lying in a vault somewhere, like Scrooge's money bin. Most of their immense wealth is not cash but property, stocks, and holdings in various companies. And they couldn't liquidate it even if they wanted to. For instance, Bill just can't sell off all his MS stock today. You have any idea what kind of panic at the exchange that would cause? There are controls set in place, he has to declare how much he plans on selling off months in advance, so that investors and speculators can prepare. And these kinds of restrictions are in place for nearly everything he owns.

So just because a guy is worth billions of dollars does not mean he can spend billions of dollars.


tl;dr omg billions of dollars doesn't automatically come in cash or whatever
 
2014-05-23 04:43:13 PM  

Eddie Adams from Torrance: I don't begrudge Gates his billions. So far, he's been pretty good about spending large amounts of it on trying to make the world just a little better.

Now if he'd only regain control of Microsoft just long enough to kill Windows 8...



Eh, there comes a point when almost everyone checks out of any company they created or worked for all of their lives.  The just say fark it and don't care after that because retirement is nice for them and they just don't want the hassle or stress of being the boss again.
 
2014-05-23 06:04:56 PM  
i think someone on fark is in love with degrasse. i mean seriously, in love in love.

/why?
 
2014-05-23 06:34:27 PM  
All right, feel free to check my math, but if you laid out $50,000,000,000 in dollar bills, it would cover 200 square miles.

/or 0.16 Rhode Islands
 
2014-05-23 09:36:06 PM  

ThatBillmanGuy: Wake me when he's hilariously trolling unamusing white people looking for castles that cost less than an apartment in New York.


Ha! All that shiat started showing up on my feed again yesterday. But ads this time. Its easier to not click.
 
2014-05-23 09:40:31 PM  

groppet: I found about 2 bucks in change when they took out the old vending machines yesterday, that was cool but there is a quarter glued to the floor.


Maybe you should put a bid in on the CLIPPERS.
 
2014-05-24 12:47:40 AM  
So what Neil is telling us is that at the time he calculated that $45000 number his own net worth was about $110,000.
 
2014-05-24 02:13:19 AM  

arentol: So what Neil is telling us is that at the time he calculated that $45000 number his own net worth was about $110,000.


His primary gig was "museum curator" before he started getting "Cosmos" and other notable gigs. High prestige, but not exactly high income.
 
2014-05-24 09:26:20 AM  
I always love how people whine about the rich when the reality is, those very people contributed to their wealth.  The simple fact is, if you don't like people being disgustingly rich, don't pay disgusting prices for their product.
 
2014-05-24 10:48:21 PM  

robohobo: I normally don't like this guy, but that was a good stand-up bit.


You and I can't be friends.
 
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