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(Popular Science)   Ever wanted to make a hamburger patty from stem cells? Well, sorry, but it's a lot harder than you think. And you also really need some new hobbies, dude   (popsci.com) divider line 12
    More: Strange, stem cells, in vitro meat, Wageningen University, animal products, arable land, pharmaceutical industry, ground beefs, cakes  
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406 clicks; posted to Geek » on 23 May 2014 at 11:56 PM (40 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



12 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-05-23 07:49:06 PM  
"Competition with normal meat is still a challenge," says Cor van der Weele, a Wageningen University bioethicist who worked with Tramper on the new paper. "We are not especially optimistic about that, in the short term."
In the future, perhaps conventional meat will rise in price, van der Weele says. That will help close the gap between in vitro and in vivo.


I've seen the same economical hope with renewable energy, but I don't think that's a good strategy.  Assuming everything is going to be more expensive and thus your more expensive product will then be competitive essentially means that consumers have to lose across the board.  I'd rather see companies like Tesla and Nissan who are aiming to be competitive on the same field within a few years.  I realize there are some state/federal subsidies for electric cars, but Tesla isn't counting on those long term.  People will adopt new technology that either costs less or has an added benefit at more cost, but offering essentially the same product or service at a higher cost is much more difficult to sell.
 
2014-05-23 08:30:46 PM  
But if I put a bunch of stem cells next to a Shaky's Pizza, will it create another Shaky's Pizza?
 
2014-05-23 10:37:37 PM  
Will it taste like despair?
 
2014-05-24 12:02:20 AM  

Nefarious: Will it taste like despair?


Probably just needs a little salt.
 
2014-05-24 12:22:50 AM  
I'll stick with my ration of Hot Fun and Bouncy Bubble Beverage, thank you.
 
2014-05-24 01:49:19 AM  
One day...one day.

www.hilltoplandscaping.com
 
2014-05-24 02:16:32 AM  
Yeah, additives for `scaffolding' as lacking the structure made possible by vascularization - no steak.  However, beat the `limit' and it will be `pink ooze' for everyone (you do want to save the environment, yes? Rid the world of all that `moo gas'?).

From another FA:

It is unclear how much cultured meat a single cell could yield. Cells in culture are believed to undergo a fixed number of doublings, called the Hayflick limit. The Hayflick limits of farm animal muscle progenitor cells have not been well-established. It has been shown that satellite  cells cloned from turkey breast muscle express telomerase.25 This finding suggests that some domestic animal satellite cells may generate enough daughter cells to produce huge quantities of cultured meat. (For instance, back-of-the-envelope calculations suggest that a single parent cell with a Hayflick limit of 75 could theoretically satisfy the current annual global demand for meat.)
http://new-harvest.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/Invitro.pdf
 
2014-05-24 03:14:15 AM  
These synthetic meat stories reminds me of a humorous Arthur C. Clark short story, called "The Food Of the Gods"

Someone posted it to the Eve Online forums here.
 
2014-05-24 03:41:27 AM  
But it won't have that ephemeral flavor of suffering imparted during the moment of slaughter that vegetards are so afeered of.
 
2014-05-24 06:16:20 AM  

drumhellar: These synthetic meat stories reminds me of a humorous Arthur C. Clark short story, called "The Food Of the Gods"

Someone posted it to the Eve Online forums here.


Very nice. But long hog is quite distinct for it's gaminess. We get few reports of the taste of young samples, although I could make you a modest proposal.
 
2014-05-24 07:03:55 AM  
Relevant:

img3.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2014-05-24 07:13:31 AM  

Lsherm: "Competition with normal meat is still a challenge," says Cor van der Weele, a Wageningen University bioethicist who worked with Tramper on the new paper. "We are not especially optimistic about that, in the short term."
In the future, perhaps conventional meat will rise in price, van der Weele says. That will help close the gap between in vitro and in vivo.

I've seen the same economical hope with renewable energy, but I don't think that's a good strategy.  Assuming everything is going to be more expensive and thus your more expensive product will then be competitive essentially means that consumers have to lose across the board.  I'd rather see companies like Tesla and Nissan who are aiming to be competitive on the same field within a few years.  I realize there are some state/federal subsidies for electric cars, but Tesla isn't counting on those long term.  People will adopt new technology that either costs less or has an added benefit at more cost, but offering essentially the same product or service at a higher cost is much more difficult to sell.


Not just more difficult.  Impossible from a pure business standpoint.

Apple had to tap into social cues to become a big product.(ie status and brand image)  "Geen" products are trying appeal to emotion and morality, which is why the gains are slow.

Human's are a fickle bunch, the best of us are barely classifiable as sane. Contrary to a lot of believers(hippies to creationists), we're still only animals, even with a marginal increase in intelligence.

We are still a species that has an instinctive need for tangible returns.

In the prophetic words of South Park.  "This is gay, back to the pile."
 
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