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(Slate)   Mars orbiter spots 50-meter wide crater on Mars less than a day after the impact that formed it   ( slate.com) divider line
    More: Cool, Mars Orbiter, Red Planet  
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3868 clicks; posted to Geek » on 22 May 2014 at 7:40 PM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



28 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-05-22 05:58:42 PM  
How is cratter formed?
 
2014-05-22 06:06:28 PM  
Static and unchanging universe?
 
2014-05-22 07:14:37 PM  
Somebody farted...

mojoimage.com
Free Image Hosting
 
2014-05-22 08:01:01 PM  
Looks like we need another Jebediah.
 
2014-05-22 08:18:58 PM  
homepage.eircom.net
"Yay, a new friend!"
 
2014-05-22 08:20:33 PM  
Opportunity just sent a message saying that it is fluent in over six million forms of communication and that the signal is not one used by the Alliance.
 
2014-05-22 08:40:41 PM  

JayCab: Opportunity just sent a message saying that it is fluent in over six million forms of communication and that the signal is not one used by the Alliance.


It's a good bet the Empire knows we're here.
 
2014-05-22 09:11:10 PM  
That's one strange looking day-old crater.  It looks thousands of years old already.

Where's all the ejecta?

/big rocks hit the Earth all the time.  And by "Earth" I mean "far out at sea where nobody sees it happen"
 
2014-05-22 09:43:35 PM  
My high school freshman science teacher (and football coach) had a weird way of explaining orbital motion that I don't quite understand.

Orbiting object is at point A. At time T, it will fall to point B. Orbitimg object has also travelled perpendicular to the direction of gravity the same distance as from point A to B (called B'), and has also fallen to where point B would have been if B were under B'. Since the earth is spherical, the orbiting object is still the same distance from earth. The end.
 
2014-05-22 09:47:44 PM  

studebaker hoch: That's one strange looking day-old crater.  It looks thousands of years old already.

Where's all the ejecta?

/big rocks hit the Earth all the time.  And by "Earth" I mean "far out at sea where nobody sees it happen"


Looks like an oblique impact, approaching from the bottom of the image, with the ejecta extending past the top edge of the frame.
 
2014-05-22 09:58:14 PM  
common sense is an oxymoron

Looks like an oblique impact, approaching from the bottom of the image, with the ejecta extending past the top edge of the frame.

www.slate.com

I don't doubt that the crater is new as claimed.  I'm wondering how the sides are so clean where the debris fell back, and why there is no raised lip.  The terrain looks completely undisturbed right to the edge.

The ground must have some strange physical properties.

Here's a new Lunar crater:

d1jqu7g1y74ds1.cloudfront.net

It looks like a new crater, ejecta rays and all.

I don't yet understand what I'm seeing in the new Martian crater.  It looks totally wrong.
 
2014-05-22 10:11:52 PM  

studebaker hoch: That's one strange looking day-old crater.  It looks thousands of years old already.

Where's all the ejecta?

/big rocks hit the Earth all the time.  And by "Earth" I mean "far out at sea where nobody sees it happen"


If it's anything like subby, it came out way too early.
 
2014-05-22 10:18:49 PM  

studebaker hoch: common sense is an oxymoron

Looks like an oblique impact, approaching from the bottom of the image, with the ejecta extending past the top edge of the frame.

[www.slate.com image 590x493]

I don't doubt that the crater is new as claimed.  I'm wondering how the sides are so clean where the debris fell back, and why there is no raised lip.  The terrain looks completely undisturbed right to the edge.

The ground must have some strange physical properties.

Here's a new Lunar crater:

[d1jqu7g1y74ds1.cloudfront.net image 350x318]

It looks like a new crater, ejecta rays and all.

I don't yet understand what I'm seeing in the new Martian crater.  It looks totally wrong.


It doesn't look like the lunar impact because this isn't the moon. This is on Mars in a completely different environment. I'd bet that there isn't a single similarity beyond the general "it was a meteor strike". Did you read the article(of course you didn't, no one does)? They have a picture from the day before that is quite different.
 
2014-05-22 10:30:07 PM  
So the ad for the first manned Mars mission is basically an updated version of an ad for an early 20th century South Pole expedition:

WANTED: People to undertake hazardous journey, small wages; fatal doses of cosmic rays; long months of complete isolation; constant danger, including the random chance of a large rock smashing you to bits; safe return doubtful; honor & recognition in case of success.
 
2014-05-22 10:37:53 PM  
That'll show the lizards!
 
2014-05-22 10:47:32 PM  

gnosis301: My high school freshman science teacher (and football coach) had a weird way of explaining orbital motion that I don't quite understand.

Orbiting object is at point A. At time T, it will fall to point B. Orbitimg object has also travelled perpendicular to the direction of gravity the same distance as from point A to B (called B'), and has also fallen to where point B would have been if B were under B'. Since the earth is spherical, the orbiting object is still the same distance from earth. The end.


That's more or less it. Think about throwing a ball from the top of a building. Its forward motion causes it to fall in an arc rather than just favorited!ing straight down. The faster you throw the ball, the bigger the arc that it will make as it travels.

In the case of an orbiting spacecraft, it's moving so fast that the radius of the arc it's falling in is bigger than the radius of the Earth, so instead of hitting the ground, it keeps missing.
 
2014-05-22 10:51:08 PM  

Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: Its forward motion causes it to fall in an arc rather than just favorited!ing straight down


Well, that is officially the strangest filter-pwn I've seen in all my years of reading Fark. Was supposed to say "p l o n k i n g"
 
2014-05-22 11:08:01 PM  

Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: gnosis301: My high school freshman science teacher (and football coach) had a weird way of explaining orbital motion that I don't quite understand.

Orbiting object is at point A. At time T, it will fall to point B. Orbitimg object has also travelled perpendicular to the direction of gravity the same distance as from point A to B (called B'), and has also fallen to where point B would have been if B were under B'. Since the earth is spherical, the orbiting object is still the same distance from earth. The end.

That's more or less it. Think about throwing a ball from the top of a building. Its forward motion causes it to fall in an arc rather than just favorited!ing straight down. The faster you throw the ball, the bigger the arc that it will make as it travels.

In the case of an orbiting spacecraft, it's moving so fast that the radius of the arc it's falling in is bigger than the radius of the Earth, so instead of hitting the ground, it keeps missing.


So the secret to flying really is to throw yourself at the ground and miss.
 
2014-05-23 12:16:04 AM  
Maybe they've finally found the Mars Climate Orbiter...
 
2014-05-23 06:38:37 AM  

studebaker hoch: common sense is an oxymoron

Looks like an oblique impact, approaching from the bottom of the image, with the ejecta extending past the top edge of the frame.

[www.slate.com image 590x493]

I don't doubt that the crater is new as claimed.  I'm wondering how the sides are so clean where the debris fell back, and why there is no raised lip.  The terrain looks completely undisturbed right to the edge.

The ground must have some strange physical properties.

Here's a new Lunar crater:

[d1jqu7g1y74ds1.cloudfront.net image 350x318]

It looks like a new crater, ejecta rays and all.

I don't yet understand what I'm seeing in the new Martian crater.  It looks totally wrong.


You have to remember the atmosphere. The Mars one probably hit at a few hundred miles per hour while the Lunar one wouldn't have slowed down at all and come in at tens of thousands of miles per hour. We're talking something vaguely the size of a pickup truck, so even Mars' thin atmosphere is going to slow it down quite a bit, particularly if it came in at a shallow angle.
 
2014-05-23 09:10:29 AM  
Is that from the same Meteor storm that the Earth is going to fly through tonight? Hope so, this planet could use a little excitement.
 
2014-05-23 10:16:36 AM  

studebaker hoch: That's one strange looking day-old crater.  It looks thousands of years old already.

Where's all the ejecta?

/big rocks hit the Earth all the time.  And by "Earth" I mean "far out at sea where nobody sees it happen"


IIRC the high resolution picture is a more recent picture of the crater. The impact itself happened two years ago. This shows a better before and after picture:

mars.nasa.gov
 
2014-05-23 10:47:49 AM  
I just love that new crater smell.
 
2014-05-23 01:22:38 PM  
I don't understand the processes that form a crater no perimeter wall.

It looks like pristine terrain, right up to the drop off.

How do you blow a hole in the ground and not leave dirt all over the place?  One hell of an oblique impact?

I thought the debris shot straight up no matter what the entry angle?
 
2014-05-23 01:23:14 PM  
..crater WITH no perimeter wall.
 
2014-05-23 03:33:50 PM  

Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: Its forward motion causes it to fall in an arc rather than just favorited!ing straight down

Well, that is officially the strangest filter-pwn I've seen in all my years of reading Fark. Was supposed to say "p l o n k i n g"


Can't say I've ever seen that one and I've been here almost 10 years. favorited!?
 
2014-05-23 04:08:37 PM  
favorited!.

favorited! favorited! favorited!.

Huh.
 
2014-05-23 08:08:14 PM  

studebaker hoch: I don't understand the processes that form a crater no perimeter wall.

It looks like pristine terrain, right up to the drop off.

How do you blow a hole in the ground and not leave dirt all over the place?  One hell of an oblique impact?

I thought the debris shot straight up no matter what the entry angle?


Most of our data on debris distribution following impacts comes from the moon and Venus, meaning either no atmosphere or a very dense atmosphere. We really don't know what happens on Mars. The alignment of the ridge on the crater floor with what looks like possible downrange ejecta makes me think this was a highly oblique impact. Even so, this crater looks weird for the reasons previously discussed.
 
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