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(Marketwatch)   Bike riding can save you money. Here are 5 ways, according to an industry spokesperson   (marketwatch.com) divider line 79
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1171 clicks; posted to Business » on 19 May 2014 at 11:27 AM (26 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-05-19 11:50:53 AM  
Stupid slide-show, no thanks
 
2014-05-19 11:52:20 AM  
Not this again.

1: A nearby multi-use trail increases the value of your home. - Indianapolis , a separate study found a home's value rose 11% when it is within a half-mile of the 10-mile Monon Trail (longer with the suburbs), and the new Cultural Trail is sparking a building boom.

So a trendy area (where trails are installed) house prices went up, no shiat Sherlock.

2: Bike local, shop local- For a four-mile round trip, whether for a quick errand or to see a friend, that's $2 a pop in savings on gas and other costs associated with owning a car.

When your time has no value.  And the other costs associated with owning a car is lumped into that 56cents a mile.

3: The moderate exercise makes you healthier

Well duh

4: A year of bike share is cheaper than a monthly transit ticket  -In Chicago, a monthly CTA pass is $100; a year of Divvy, the local bike-share program, is $75. In New York City, a 30-day unlimited pass is $112; a yearlong membership in Citibike is $95 (plus tax). Users in Chicago can take as many trips of up to 30 minutes as they like at no extra cost, and New Yorkers get 45 free minutes per trip.

Great since EVERYONE lives in a city that has this.  How is it cheaper to pay for a year than a month?

5: The tax break  -  For those who do want to bike commute, there's a tax break similar to the one for taking mass transit and for parking. The caveat is that an employer must offer the perk (the same goes for transit and parking), and an employee can't claim it for both transit and bike riding.

"Any employer, if they chose to do so, may provide a reimbursement of up to $20 per month for reasonable expenses incurred by the employee in conjunction with their commute to work by bike. The reimbursement is a fringe benefit paid by the employer the employee does not get taxed on the amount of the reimbursement. "

LOL yeah sure I bet there are tons of employers giving that out.

If biking to work, works for you then great I'm happy for you.  Don't try and force it onto everyone since everyone is not in your same situation.  Not everyone can bike and it's not because they are lazy and fat.
 
2014-05-19 11:53:32 AM  

TNel: Great since EVERYONE lives in a city that has this. How is it cheaper to pay for a year than a month?


Ok now I get it one is the bus ticket the other is the bike, skip that last sentence.
 
2014-05-19 11:54:39 AM  
Subby do you know how annoying it is to call out "Okay Glass - Next!" while accelerating through a crowded cross walk at a red light?  I can only do so many things at once.  Fark you and your slide show links, I have an important package to deliver and now I'm not going to beat my previous time!
 
2014-05-19 11:57:11 AM  
Shop Local?  I ride 50- 100 miles a week weather permitting (I don't ride in the rain), but I always drive the 3 miles to the grocery store I know I could not get enough groceries on my bike to make even think riding was an option.
 
2014-05-19 11:57:57 AM  

TNel: Not this again.

1: A nearby multi-use trail increases the value of your home. - Indianapolis , a separate study found a home's value rose 11% when it is within a half-mile of the 10-mile Monon Trail (longer with the suburbs), and the new Cultural Trail is sparking a building boom.

So a trendy area (where trails are installed) house prices went up, no shiat Sherlock.

2: Bike local, shop local- For a four-mile round trip, whether for a quick errand or to see a friend, that's $2 a pop in savings on gas and other costs associated with owning a car.

When your time has no value.  And the other costs associated with owning a car is lumped into that 56cents a mile.

3: The moderate exercise makes you healthier

Well duh

4: A year of bike share is cheaper than a monthly transit ticket  -In Chicago, a monthly CTA pass is $100; a year of Divvy, the local bike-share program, is $75. In New York City, a 30-day unlimited pass is $112; a yearlong membership in Citibike is $95 (plus tax). Users in Chicago can take as many trips of up to 30 minutes as they like at no extra cost, and New Yorkers get 45 free minutes per trip.

Great since EVERYONE lives in a city that has this.  How is it cheaper to pay for a year than a month?

5: The tax break  -  For those who do want to bike commute, there's a tax break similar to the one for taking mass transit and for parking. The caveat is that an employer must offer the perk (the same goes for transit and parking), and an employee can't claim it for both transit and bike riding.

"Any employer, if they chose to do so, may provide a reimbursement of up to $20 per month for reasonable expenses incurred by the employee in conjunction with their commute to work by bike. The reimbursement is a fringe benefit paid by the employer the employee does not get taxed on the amount of the reimbursement. "

LOL yeah sure I bet there are tons of employers giving that out.

If biking to work, works for you then great I'm happy for you.  Don't try and force it onto everyone since everyone is not in your same situation.  Not everyone can bike and it's not because they are lazy and fat.



Force? Did you even the "article"? The caption on the first farking slide clearly states:

"While riding to work isn't an option for many..."


\You sound fat and lazy
 
2014-05-19 12:04:03 PM  

Tom_Slick: I always drive the 3 miles to the grocery store I know I could not get enough groceries on my bike to make even think riding was an option.


Even when my only transportation was a motorcycle, and even with the largest saddlebags I could find, grocery shopping was a pain and typically required multiple trips to do my shopping.  And also usually required additional trips during the week to get things that I didn't pick up on the weekend.

Can't imagine how difficult it would be to do the same on a bicycle.
 
2014-05-19 12:09:30 PM  

Tom_Slick: Shop Local?  I ride 50- 100 miles a week weather permitting (I don't ride in the rain), but I always drive the 3 miles to the grocery store I know I could not get enough groceries on my bike to make even think riding was an option.


Probably depends a whole lot on your family size and consumption patterns.  Bike shoppers will naturally gravitate toward Kool-Aid over bottled soda, for instance.  But, I'm shocked at how easily 50-60 pounds tows with this little guy (geared into ultra-granny for the one uphill between my house and nearest grocery).
fueledbyrice.org
 
2014-05-19 12:09:38 PM  

max_pooper: Force? Did you even the "article"?
The caption on the first farking slide clearly states:"While riding to work isn't an option for many..."
\You sound fat and lazy


Every time this thread comes up everyone tries to shoehorn their situation into everyone elses.  This thread is very similar to the tipping thread.
 
2014-05-19 12:09:58 PM  
How is riding a bike going to save me money...I currently teleport to work.
 
2014-05-19 12:14:15 PM  
How to turn a swift morning commute into 30 minutes of white-knuckle butt-sweating terror.

/no way in hell
 
2014-05-19 12:18:03 PM  
Annual subscriptions to premium services for sites like Strava (Facebook for cyclists,) Trainerroad, and ridewithGPS bite significantly cut into annual gas and car maintenance savings. That's before you buy a bike and either get the bug to buy accessories for it or get the bug to buy crazy expensive gear.

/bikes to work
//doesn't kid self about savings
///stops at stop signs
 
2014-05-19 12:21:35 PM  
1: A nearby multi-use trail increases the value of your home. - Indianapolis , a separate study found a home's value rose 11% when it is within a half-mile of the 10-mile Monon Trail (longer with the suburbs), and the new Cultural Trail is sparking a building boom.

TNel:
So a trendy area (where trails are installed) house prices went up, no shiat Sherlock.

Real estate values tend to go up pretty much everywhere there's a trail. Tampa had increased value for most of the length of their trails, and so did other places, like Cincinnati. There may be trendy places near trails, but they tend to spring up after the trails are installed, like the Plant Street neighborhood in Winter Garden, FL.

I haven't been able to find any place where home values went down after a bike trail opened nearby. Have you?
 
2014-05-19 12:25:30 PM  

cirby: 1: A nearby multi-use trail increases the value of your home. - Indianapolis , a separate study found a home's value rose 11% when it is within a half-mile of the 10-mile Monon Trail (longer with the suburbs), and the new Cultural Trail is sparking a building boom.

TNel:
So a trendy area (where trails are installed) house prices went up, no shiat Sherlock.

Real estate values tend to go up pretty much everywhere there's a trail. Tampa had increased value for most of the length of their trails, and so did other places, like Cincinnati. There may be trendy places near trails, but they tend to spring up after the trails are installed, like the Plant Street neighborhood in Winter Garden, FL.

I haven't been able to find any place where home values went down after a bike trail opened nearby. Have you?


Because they install trails in trendy areas. How hard is that to grasp?  You think they will spend millions on trails in a poor neighborhood?
 
2014-05-19 12:27:00 PM  

TNel: cirby: 1: A nearby multi-use trail increases the value of your home. - Indianapolis , a separate study found a home's value rose 11% when it is within a half-mile of the 10-mile Monon Trail (longer with the suburbs), and the new Cultural Trail is sparking a building boom.

TNel:
So a trendy area (where trails are installed) house prices went up, no shiat Sherlock.

Real estate values tend to go up pretty much everywhere there's a trail. Tampa had increased value for most of the length of their trails, and so did other places, like Cincinnati. There may be trendy places near trails, but they tend to spring up after the trails are installed, like the Plant Street neighborhood in Winter Garden, FL.

I haven't been able to find any place where home values went down after a bike trail opened nearby. Have you?

Because they install trails in trendy areas. How hard is that to grasp?  You think they will spend millions on trails in a poor neighborhood?


Yes.
 
2014-05-19 12:31:26 PM  
My commute (30 miles/day) when driving costs ~$15/day for tolls and gas.
My commute when biking costs ~$0/day
 
2014-05-19 12:33:34 PM  

max_pooper: Yes.


And I'm sure you have a cite on that right?  I mean the one they just put in a few years ago in our city is in the trendy area around the college, just far enough away from the poor neighborhoods.
 
2014-05-19 12:33:56 PM  

TNel: For a four-mile round trip, whether for a quick errand or to see a friend, that's $2 a pop in savings on gas and other costs associated with owning a car.

When your time has no value.  And the other costs associated with owning a car is lumped into that 56cents a mile.


The time difference between driving and cycling 2 miles to a store can be minimal especially if the placing going to has crappy parking.
 
2014-05-19 12:36:18 PM  

Muta: The time difference between driving and cycling 2 miles to a store can be minimal especially if the placing going to has crappy parking.


Probably about 30min if not a bit more depending on elevation. Is 30min of your time worth $2?
 
2014-05-19 12:38:17 PM  

TNel: max_pooper: Yes.

And I'm sure you have a cite on that right?  I mean the one they just put in a few years ago in our city is in the trendy area around the college, just far enough away from the poor neighborhoods.



This is what a "trendy area" looks likes according TNel:

img.fark.net
 
2014-05-19 12:39:20 PM  
I was going to bike to work today but didn't because I didn't get up early enough, so I'm getting a kick out of most of these replies.
 
2014-05-19 12:40:54 PM  

TNel: Muta: The time difference between driving and cycling 2 miles to a store can be minimal especially if the placing going to has crappy parking.

Probably about 30min if not a bit more depending on elevation. Is 30min of your time worth $2?


Are you biking up the north face of Everest?
 
2014-05-19 12:43:56 PM  

TNel: Muta: The time difference between driving and cycling 2 miles to a store can be minimal especially if the placing going to has crappy parking.


Probably about 30min if not a bit more depending on elevation. Is 30min of your time worth $2?


Yeah, you need a new bike or a new rider.  I'm an undeniable fattie (though deceptively fast on a bike for my size), and the 4-mile round trip to my second-nearest grocery doesn't take 30 minutes, let alone subtracting out the 12 minutes it would take to drive there and back.
 
2014-05-19 12:48:34 PM  

max_pooper: TNel: max_pooper: Yes.

And I'm sure you have a cite on that right?  I mean the one they just put in a few years ago in our city is in the trendy area around the college, just far enough away from the poor neighborhoods.


This is what a "trendy area" looks likes according TNel:

[img.fark.net image 850x337]


So all of those houses increased in value by 11%?  Great.  I'm impressed on their selection of a trail.
 
2014-05-19 12:49:57 PM  

Target Builder: Are you biking up the north face of Everest?


Lawnchair: Yeah, you need a new bike or a new rider.  I'm an undeniable fattie (though deceptively fast on a bike for my size), and the 4-mile round trip to my second-nearest grocery doesn't take 30 minutes, let alone subtracting out the 12 minutes it would take to drive there and back.


Are you guys teleporting back with your groceries?  If you are teleporting back you might as well teleport there and skip the bike.
 
2014-05-19 12:53:46 PM  

TNel: max_pooper: TNel: max_pooper: Yes.

And I'm sure you have a cite on that right?  I mean the one they just put in a few years ago in our city is in the trendy area around the college, just far enough away from the poor neighborhoods.


This is what a "trendy area" looks likes according TNel:

[img.fark.net image 850x337]

So all of those houses increased in value by 11%?  Great.  I'm impressed on their selection of a trail.


So are you admitting that you were wrong with your claim that bike trails aren't built in poor neighborhoods? Cause it's sounds an awful lot like you are admitting you are a dumbass.
 
2014-05-19 12:55:46 PM  

TNel: Target Builder: Are you biking up the north face of Everest?

Lawnchair: Yeah, you need a new bike or a new rider.  I'm an undeniable fattie (though deceptively fast on a bike for my size), and the 4-mile round trip to my second-nearest grocery doesn't take 30 minutes, let alone subtracting out the 12 minutes it would take to drive there and back.

Are you guys teleporting back with your groceries?  If you are teleporting back you might as well teleport there and skip the bike.



As fat as you sound, you could probably just skip groceries all together for a couple months.
 
2014-05-19 12:58:43 PM  

max_pooper: As fat as you sound, you could probably just skip groceries all together for a couple months.


Picture showing only 25% of the hill outside.  Going up sucks, down is fun.  If you can get up that hill in much more than 10 min and it's just about a mile up I would be impressed.  Streetview is bad at elevation but it's sizeable.  But you got me I'm a lard ass that's why I pass my PT test every year with the military.

s4.postimg.org
 
2014-05-19 01:02:22 PM  

TNel: LOL yeah sure I bet there are tons of employers giving that out.


I do...by which I mean I encourage my employees to ride by providing them free secure indoor bike parking and free e-bike charging. Two of them currently do so. One every day; the other 2-3 times a week.
 
2014-05-19 01:02:33 PM  

max_pooper: TNel: max_pooper: Yes.

And I'm sure you have a cite on that right?  I mean the one they just put in a few years ago in our city is in the trendy area around the college, just far enough away from the poor neighborhoods.


This is what a "trendy area" looks likes according TNel:

[img.fark.net image 850x337]


Nice, I was going to bring up Houston's third ward too.

Considered buying a nearly-new house in the Third Ward (only $77k then) when I started grad school at Rice, getting a CCW, and biking their daily, but my wife nixed that plan.

It depends on your time horizon for appreciation, though, since I think the Third Ward is getting better near downtown now.
 
2014-05-19 01:03:12 PM  

YixilTesiphon: max_pooper: TNel: max_pooper: Yes.

And I'm sure you have a cite on that right?  I mean the one they just put in a few years ago in our city is in the trendy area around the college, just far enough away from the poor neighborhoods.


This is what a "trendy area" looks likes according TNel:

[img.fark.net image 850x337]

Nice, I was going to bring up Houston's third ward too.

Considered buying a nearly-new house in the Third Ward (only $77k then) when I started grad school at Rice, getting a CCW, and biking their daily, but my wife nixed that plan.

It depends on your time horizon for appreciation, though, since I think the Third Ward is getting better near downtown now.


There. Sorry about that.
 
2014-05-19 01:04:58 PM  

TNel: max_pooper: As fat as you sound, you could probably just skip groceries all together for a couple months.

Picture showing only 25% of the hill outside.  Going up sucks, down is fun.  If you can get up that hill in much more than 10 min and it's just about a mile up I would be impressed.  Streetview is bad at elevation but it's sizeable.  But you got me I'm a lard ass that's why I pass my PT test every year with the military.

[s4.postimg.org image 720x338]


Yeah, that looks like a killer hill there Coreman McFatterson.
 
2014-05-19 01:05:00 PM  

Stone Meadow: I do...by which I mean I encourage my employees to ride by providing them free secure indoor bike parking and free e-bike charging. Two of them currently do so. One every day; the other 2-3 times a week.


So you give them $20 a month on their paycheck?
 
2014-05-19 01:05:22 PM  

TNel: 4: A year of bike share is cheaper than a monthly transit ticket  -In Chicago, a monthly CTA pass is $100; a year of Divvy, the local bike-share program, is $75. In New York City, a 30-day unlimited pass is $112; a yearlong membership in Citibike is $95 (plus tax). Users in Chicago can take as many trips of up to 30 minutes as they like at no extra cost, and New Yorkers get 45 free minutes per trip.

Great since EVERYONE lives in a city that has this.  How is it cheaper to pay for a year than a month?


They're comparing a month of mass transit costs to a year of bike-share program fees.
 
2014-05-19 01:08:43 PM  

Target Builder: They're comparing a month of mass transit costs to a year of bike-share program fees.


which I corrected 1 min after posting.
 
2014-05-19 01:11:16 PM  

TNel: Target Builder: They're comparing a month of mass transit costs to a year of bike-share program fees.

which I corrected 1 min after posting.


Ah. Carry on then.
 
2014-05-19 01:13:47 PM  
Bicycles are surprisingly heavy on maintenance. I bought a used S-Works and a new Cannondale Six 6. Both require more time / money per 100 miles than my car, gas aside. It's such a pain in the ass that I'm selling both and sticking exclusively to an indoor trainer. fark biking, and fark bicyclists.
 
2014-05-19 01:15:06 PM  

TNel: Stone Meadow: I do...by which I mean I encourage my employees to ride by providing them free secure indoor bike parking and free e-bike charging. Two of them currently do so. One every day; the other 2-3 times a week.

So you give them $20 a month on their paycheck?


No, but that's not what happens in TFA, either: "Any employer, if they chose to do so, may provide a reimbursement of up to $20 per month for reasonable expenses incurred by the employee in conjunction with their commute to work by bike. The reimbursement is a fringe benefit paid by the employer the employee does not get taxed on the amount of the reimbursement." I provide free space valued at $15.60/mo., plus free e-bike charging valued at several more dollars a month.
 
2014-05-19 01:17:58 PM  

TNel: Because they install trails in trendy areas. How hard is that to grasp? You think they will spend millions on trails in a poor neighborhood?


They have spent a lot of money in Detroit on bike lanes, a trail, and bike-friendly streets.
 
2014-05-19 01:18:41 PM  

Stone Meadow: No, but that's not what happens in TFA, either: "Any employer, if they chose to do so, may provide a reimbursement of up to $20 per month for reasonable expenses incurred by the employee in conjunction with their commute to work by bike. The reimbursement is a fringe benefit paid by the employer the employee does not get taxed on the amount of the reimbursement." I provide free space valued at $15.60/mo., plus free e-bike charging valued at several more dollars a month.


But that's what the IRS says you can give.  Storage of their bikes costs you nothing.  They could chain them to a tree for free also.  What I was mocking was employers given people $20 which you just proved my point.  Very few will do that.
 
2014-05-19 01:22:52 PM  

Fonaibung: Bicycles are surprisingly heavy on maintenance. I bought a used S-Works and a new Cannondale Six 6. Both require more time / money per 100 miles than my car, gas aside. It's such a pain in the ass that I'm selling both and sticking exclusively to an indoor trainer. fark biking, and fark bicyclists.


Seriously?  I have a Cannondale M500 from mid to late nineties that has at least a thousand miles on it and I've only replaced stuff for looks for the most part.  Carbon fiber handlebar, new seat.  But all of the other parts are stock except I'm replacing shifters this week since my BIL borrowed it and broke them.  He manages to break everything he borrows.

More expensive bikes go a very long time before they break.  My wifes el cheapo Walmart bike is always broken and weighs a ton in comparison.
 
2014-05-19 01:39:41 PM  

wxboy: TNel: Because they install trails in trendy areas. How hard is that to grasp? You think they will spend millions on trails in a poor neighborhood?

They have spent a lot of money in Detroit on bike lanes, a trail, and bike-friendly streets.


There is a nice bike path in the Philly area and they have to put cops out in the rough areas in the summer because kids will rob people for their bikes (sometimes violently)
 
2014-05-19 01:43:05 PM  

TNel: I have a Cannondale M500 from mid to late nineties that has at least a thousand miles on it...


Might I suggest that you don't ride much? I'm creeping up on 2000 miles on a bike I bought last July and I took the winter off.
 
2014-05-19 01:46:43 PM  

TNel: Stone Meadow: No, but that's not what happens in TFA, either: "Any employer, if they chose to do so, may provide a reimbursement of up to $20 per month for reasonable expenses incurred by the employee in conjunction with their commute to work by bike. The reimbursement is a fringe benefit paid by the employer the employee does not get taxed on the amount of the reimbursement." I provide free space valued at $15.60/mo., plus free e-bike charging valued at several more dollars a month.

But that's what the IRS says you can give.  Storage of their bikes costs you nothing.  They could chain them to a tree for free also.  What I was mocking was employers given people $20 which you just proved my point.  Very few will do that.


Unless I misunderstand the IRS page on the biking expense all you get to do is set aside $20/month pre-tax from your regular paycheck that you then need to spend on bike maintenance, and presumably keep receipts.

If so it seems like a pathetic tax break - you save between $3 and $7 a month depending on your tax rate and have to go to the hassle of keeping records and doing paperwork to get it set up.
 
2014-05-19 01:48:57 PM  
Personal experience biking to and from work, for errands  etc saves me a couple of grand a year. I also eat better since I tend to pick up ingredients for meals instead of buying bulk processed goods. ymmv, but it helps that I live, shop, and drink within a 3 mile radius.
 
zez
2014-05-19 01:49:53 PM  

moos: Annual subscriptions to premium services for sites like Strava (Facebook for cyclists,) Trainerroad, and ridewithGPS bite significantly cut into annual gas and car maintenance savings. That's before you buy a bike and either get the bug to buy accessories for it or get the bug to buy crazy expensive gear.

/bikes to work
//doesn't kid self about savings
///stops at stop signs


I could buy gas for a year for the price of a Garmin 810
 
zez
2014-05-19 01:52:47 PM  

TNel: cirby: 1: A nearby multi-use trail increases the value of your home. - Indianapolis , a separate study found a home's value rose 11% when it is within a half-mile of the 10-mile Monon Trail (longer with the suburbs), and the new Cultural Trail is sparking a building boom.

TNel:
So a trendy area (where trails are installed) house prices went up, no shiat Sherlock.

Real estate values tend to go up pretty much everywhere there's a trail. Tampa had increased value for most of the length of their trails, and so did other places, like Cincinnati. There may be trendy places near trails, but they tend to spring up after the trails are installed, like the Plant Street neighborhood in Winter Garden, FL.

I haven't been able to find any place where home values went down after a bike trail opened nearby. Have you?

Because they install trails in trendy areas. How hard is that to grasp?  You think they will spend millions on trails in a poor neighborhood?


www.chicagonow.com

Riverfront trail in North St. Louis
 
zez
2014-05-19 01:55:47 PM  

max_pooper: TNel: max_pooper: Yes.

And I'm sure you have a cite on that right?  I mean the one they just put in a few years ago in our city is in the trendy area around the college, just far enough away from the poor neighborhoods.


This is what a "trendy area" looks likes according TNel:

[img.fark.net image 850x337]



yes, a lot of new trails are repurposed train right of ways, and we know how the rich liked to live next to the tracks.
 
2014-05-19 01:59:27 PM  

TNel: Stone Meadow: No, but that's not what happens in TFA...

But that's what the IRS says you can give.  Storage of their bikes costs you nothing.  They could chain them to a tree for free also.  What I was mocking was employers given people $20 which you just proved my point.  Very few will do that.


Wrong...it costs me $15.60/mo IN CASH, because I lease the space per square foot. I could use that space for other things, but consider it a good investment. Mock me all you like, but in the end it doesn't matter if I reimburse them $20 or I spend it directly on their behalf...I'm still spending the money for an employee benefit.
 
2014-05-19 02:01:09 PM  
Jeeze, TNel. Did a bike murder one of your family members or something? We have a slideshow that suggests how biking can save you money. In some contexts, yeah, it might not. But in others it might. At worst the author is offers some reasons that someone might consider biking to work. Just because they don't apparently fit

TNel: Not this again.

1: A nearby multi-use trail increases the value of your home. - Indianapolis , a separate study found a home's value rose 11% when it is within a half-mile of the 10-mile Monon Trail (longer with the suburbs), and the new Cultural Trail is sparking a building boom.

So a trendy area (where trails are installed) house prices went up, no shiat Sherlock.

Have you been to Indianapolis? There is not 10-mile stretch of continuous "trendiness" along the Monon.

2: Bike local, shop local- For a four-mile round trip, whether for a quick errand or to see a friend, that's $2 a pop in savings on gas and other costs associated with owning a car.

When your time has no value.  And the other costs associated with owning a car is lumped into that 56cents a mile.

No value? What? I live 2 miles from my grocery and can get their faster biking than driving. Not everyone lives in that situation, but I bet some do and don't realize it.

3: The moderate exercise makes you healthier

Well duh

It's obvious, so just don't mention it?

4: A year of bike share is cheaper than a monthly transit ticket  -In Chicago, a monthly CTA pass is $100; a year of Divvy, the local bike-share program, is $75. In New York City, a 30-day unlimited pass is $112; a yearlong membership in Citibike is $95 (plus tax). Users in Chicago can take as many trips of up to 30 minutes as they like at no extra cost, and New Yorkers get 45 free minutes per trip.

Great since EVERYONE lives in a city that has this.  How is it cheaper to pay for a year than a month?

Some people do live in cities that offer these services. This list was never advertised as universal.

5: The tax break  -  For those who do want to bike commute, there's a tax break similar to the one for taking mass transit and for parking. The caveat is that an employer must offer the perk (the same goes for transit and parking), and an employee can't claim it for both transit and bike riding.

"Any employer, if they chose to do so, may provide a reimbursement of up to $20 per month for reasonable expenses incurred by the employee in conjunction with their commute to work by bike. The reimbursement is a fringe benefit paid by the employer the employee does not get taxed on the amount of the reimbursement. "

LOL yeah sure I bet there are tons of employers giving that out.

Again, how bike riding CAN save you money, not WILL. "Can" implies caveats which the writers of this are at least a little bit honest about.

If biking to work, works for you then great I'm happy for you.  Don't try and for ...
Encourage to consider bike riding != forcing

Did bikes murder a family member? I'm confused at why you're being so aggressively anti-bike when this piece just offers some points to consider that may or may not be relevant to a given context. I know bike people can be a bit abrasive in their passion, but this piece is exactly what you requested when you wrote, "Don't try and force it onto everyone since everyone is not in your same situation."
 
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