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(Wikipedia)   Mount St. Helens blew its top 34 years ago today. Do any Old Farkers have stories from that day?   (en.wikipedia.org ) divider line
    More: Survey, Mount St. Helens, Eruption of Mount St. Helens, building up, Columbia River, Harry R. Truman, St. Helens, Forest Service, thousands  
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253 clicks; posted to FarkUs » on 18 May 2014 at 6:48 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-05-18 01:49:59 PM  
First let me put my dentures in and drink some of this here sasparilla...

I was nine and living north of Burlington, about 200 north of Mt. St. Helens.  We heard the blast and it was loud (I want to say we heard two blasts but maybe it was just one)!  We thought the neighbors were blowing up stumps as they were clearing some land at that time.  No ash blew our way.  It was also my brother's birthday who hasn't been in contact with our family for 20 years so my thoughts always drift to him today.
 
2014-05-18 01:51:11 PM  
200 miles that is.  When is Matlock on?
 
2014-05-18 01:59:59 PM  
I was about half a world away in Germany, and watched the reports on AFRTS, and then I went back to worrying if my Dad was going to get in more Orangina. I was like 10. It was very smoky on the TV reports though, and the aerial footage did impress the crap out of me. Then Starblazers came on, and I sort of lost interest...
 
2014-05-18 02:00:05 PM  
At first I was all like "whoa" then I was more like "huh"

Book rights are for sale but I haven't found the right deal yet.
 
2014-05-18 02:02:11 PM  
And before you whippersnappers come in to piss on OBD's claim he heard it 200 miles away, know that Krakatoa was heard 3,000 miles away.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krakatoa
 
2014-05-18 02:04:42 PM  
I was at Indy a week or so later, watching time trials, on a beautiful sunny Sunday afternoon. Forewarned by weather forecasters, we looked up in late afternoon and could clearly make out the leading edge of the ash cloud. It wasn't terribly thick at that point, but it was easily discerned.
 
2014-05-18 02:53:57 PM  
I was still in utero.

/born in June
 
2014-05-18 03:34:40 PM  
I was 12.  It was cool.  We got a little ash here on the ground in southern Alberta.
 
2014-05-18 04:16:57 PM  
My husband was up at SIR for the motorcycle races when they announced that the mountain had blown.  When they headed back down I5 to Portland they got stopped about 2 miles north of the Toutle River bridge because there was so much debris coming down the river that the bridge had been closed.  They pulled over to the shoulder and managed to get turned around and drove north, up the shoulder of the southbound lane, to the last offramp, and got off I5 to find a place to sleep.  They camped out in a schoolyard there overnight.

The next day, they headed back down south.  The bridge had been reopened because the water level had receded.  They pulled over to the side and got out to look--he says it was like a thick, gray soup, and there was steam coming up and the river was churning with logs.  The banks of the river were all torn up, and you could see on the trees still standing that the river had been up about ten feet--they were plastered with mud up their trunks.  The river was roaring and churning and they could feel the bridge vibrating under their feet as the mud flowed beneath it.

While they were at the track they'd heard rumors of Portland being covered with two feet of ash, all kinds of wild speculation.  Not so much, it turned out.  They could see the ash cloud when they got down this way, but Portland ended up with mostly a dusting.

Me, I was in 9th grade in southern California--it was just a story on the nightly news.
 
2014-05-18 04:36:26 PM  
Was up in Victoria Canada - about 200 miles away - that morning, woken up to what sounded like cannon shots just outside the hotel. Looked out the window and saw all the glass in the surrounding buildings shaking like they were about to break, It just kept rolling on and on for what seemed like an hour.
 
2014-05-18 04:53:02 PM  
I moved from Redmond, WA about ten days before the lid blew off of it.  It was surrounded in a volcanic haze when we drove (relatively) near its area.  It was not a surprise that it erupted.  It had been smoldering for weeks.
 
2014-05-18 05:11:44 PM  
I was living in Springfield at the time so we didn't get much more than a light dusting of ash. I remember warnings on the local TV news and in the newspapers to not try to wipe the ash off vehicles because the ash would scratch the paint. We were able to scoop up enough ash to fill a small aspirin bottle and that was sent to my maternal grandma in Denver.


I was also concerned if the ash posed any danger to pregnant women (ash particulates in air) as I was pregnant with my son at the time (he was born August, 1980), as were several friends and acquaintances.
 
2014-05-18 05:14:26 PM  
Meh, I'm so old I got stories from when Vesuvius blew its top.  Now get off my lawn!
 
2014-05-18 05:14:28 PM  
I was in my mothers womb in Minneapolis. I definitely heard it then again that could have been my mom farting.
 
2014-05-18 05:21:48 PM  
I was drinking beer.  I was always drinking beer at that time in my life.

/not much different than now actually
//I vaguely remember the news reports
///my ash covered lawn, you're on it
 
2014-05-18 05:23:10 PM  
I had just returned  from a month away at claims training school for Crawford & Company in Atlanta.  My kids were 19 months and two months old, so I was getting to know them again and make up for lost sexy time with my wife.  When Mt. St. Helens blew, I was kind of worried about a guy in had been in training with.  He lived just north of there and his wife was due to give birth to their first kid.  The night after the eruption, he called, right as we were, umm, in the middle of things.  My wife was a bit pissed about that until she learned they were OK and the baby had just been born hours before the call.  Still, it kinda killed the mood.
 
2014-05-18 05:40:39 PM  

ItHurtsWhenIDoThis: Was up in Victoria Canada - about 200 miles away - that morning, woken up to what sounded like cannon shots just outside the hotel. Looked out the window and saw all the glass in the surrounding buildings shaking like they were about to break, It just kept rolling on and on for what seemed like an hour.


Was also in Victoria, sitting at my parent's kitchen table for breakfast.  Sounded like someone kicked a soccer ball against the house.

Knocked the onion right off my belt, it did.
 
2014-05-18 05:58:24 PM  
I was living 3000 miles away from it and was really, really, really stoned.

Really stoned.

I came to realize that in perspective the event itself was pretty much the same to the earth as my popping a pimple was to my face. Not really that big a deal in the scheme of the universe.
 
2014-05-18 06:42:46 PM  

Prey4reign: Meh, I'm so old I got stories from when Vesuvius blew its top.  Now get off my lawn!


March 1944?
 
2014-05-18 06:44:47 PM  
I remember it happened tight around the ending of high school.  There wasn't the 24/7 news like there is today so while it was a big deal, the magnitude was kind of lost on a fresh high school grad who had to go to work.
 
2014-05-18 06:48:28 PM  
Shoot, I must have been 12. I remember the news report and the adults being concerned. We lived innillinois, I seem to remember we got a little ash dusting- but I may be remembering wrong. I know that the sunsets were really more intense.
 
2014-05-18 07:22:44 PM  
I was in Portland and having a dinner party.
I lived in a big apartment complex and people were outside running in that stuff like it was snow. After this the news issued warning against that.
Many cars had problems because of the ash.
I was there (St Helens) before and after the eruption, now I'm not far enough from Rainier and following the PNSN.
Here -http://www.pnsn.org/
 
2014-05-18 07:25:23 PM  
I lived a little north of Seattle. I heard the boom and looked outside, but had no idea what it was. Went to a friend's house to go motorcycle riding and found out the mountain blew. Watched it on television all day.

I was at Newport Oregon the next weekend and it blew up some more ash and had a very light dusting there. I headed home in a hurry, having no idea what was going to happen next.
 
2014-05-18 07:44:52 PM  
I remember President Reagan and Admiral Gorbachev finally signing the alliance treaty that resulted in our blowing the shiat out of the farking Venusians for the sneak attack on the City of Helens. And then I remember the highly classified HAARP program that covered it up by reprogramming much of the world's minds.

God Bless them both.
 
2014-05-18 07:55:21 PM  
Jeez. I didn't realize that was 34 years ago.

I feel old. :(
 
2014-05-18 07:58:06 PM  
Old?

Fark you, you farking fark.
 
2014-05-18 07:59:51 PM  
We watched it on the news in Ohio and the following August my dad was like, "We're going to Mt. St. Helens for vacation."  It was great.  There weren't many visitors and he drove as far up the mountain as the park service would let us.  We still have hundreds of pictures and video.  Every time we passed a burnt out car or saw a sign that indicated someone had died nearby you can hear my father on the video say "dumbass."  It wasn't until years later the story came out that the park service had botched the estimated evacuation area, so at the time it was thought everyone who died simply didn't follow the evacuation order.

I remember a mud lake full of trees.  It was absofarkinglutely huge and just filled to the brim with burnt trees.  I've never seen anything like it.
 
2014-05-18 08:07:57 PM  

RoyBatty: I remember President Reagan and Admiral Gorbachev finally signing the alliance treaty that resulted in our blowing the shiat out of the farking Venusians for the sneak attack on the City of Helens. And then I remember the highly classified HAARP program that covered it up by reprogramming much of the world's minds.

God Bless them both.


Yeah, that finally ended the cold war. Unfortunately the St Helens event was the beginning of the Venusian climate change scheme. I'm glad we got them before phase II.
 
2014-05-18 08:33:58 PM  
I remembering thinking it was a fitting end for the man who atom bombed Japan.
 
2014-05-18 08:36:40 PM  

Lsherm: We watched it on the news in Ohio and the following August my dad was like, "We're going to Mt. St. Helens for vacation."  It was great.  There weren't many visitors and he drove as far up the mountain as the park service would let us.  We still have hundreds of pictures and video.  Every time we passed a burnt out car or saw a sign that indicated someone had died nearby you can hear my father on the video say "dumbass."  It wasn't until years later the story came out that the park service had botched the estimated evacuation area, so at the time it was thought everyone who died simply didn't follow the evacuation order.

I remember a mud lake full of trees.  It was absofarkinglutely huge and just filled to the brim with burnt trees.  I've never seen anything like it.


You saw something most people have not. It's one of those 'you gotta be there' things.
Unfortunately, my spare bedroom may be blazed under the lahar so I can't offer it to you for your next West coast trip.
 
2014-05-18 09:01:50 PM  
I was ten, living in Spokane. That Sunday morning, I was at a friend's house, having spent the night. We were going to go the annual airshow at Fairchild AFB. While approaching the base, we could see the black ash cloud approaching from the west. We turned around and headed home. My friend ended up staying with us for a few days since we couldn't drive him home.

I still have a peanut butter jar with some ash somewhere.

/submitter
 
2014-05-18 09:12:03 PM  
I have since snow hiked to the summit and stared down from the lip of the volcano at the massive cone. That was a very memorable day.

/can see St. Helens from my 'hood on a clear day
//been a lot of those days so far this year, surprisingly
///not today though
////four slashes
 
2014-05-18 09:16:28 PM  

zerkalo: I was ten, living in Spokane. That Sunday morning, I was at a friend's house, having spent the night. We were going to go the annual airshow at Fairchild AFB. While approaching the base, we could see the black ash cloud approaching from the west. We turned around and headed home. My friend ended up staying with us for a few days since we couldn't drive him home.

I still have a peanut butter jar with some ash somewhere.

/submitter


It's amazing how you have still pristine forests on one side and total annihilation on the other. It's really farking cool.
 
2014-05-18 09:22:44 PM  
Cone, dome, whatever.
 
2014-05-18 09:32:56 PM  
Some friends of mine were tearing off an old three tab roof last week in Yakima and it still had ash hidden in it.
 
2014-05-18 09:58:55 PM  

JoieD'Zen: Lsherm: We watched it on the news in Ohio and the following August my dad was like, "We're going to Mt. St. Helens for vacation."  It was great.  There weren't many visitors and he drove as far up the mountain as the park service would let us.  We still have hundreds of pictures and video.  Every time we passed a burnt out car or saw a sign that indicated someone had died nearby you can hear my father on the video say "dumbass."  It wasn't until years later the story came out that the park service had botched the estimated evacuation area, so at the time it was thought everyone who died simply didn't follow the evacuation order.

I remember a mud lake full of trees.  It was absofarkinglutely huge and just filled to the brim with burnt trees.  I've never seen anything like it.

You saw something most people have not. It's one of those 'you gotta be there' things.
Unfortunately, my spare bedroom may be blazed under the lahar so I can't offer it to you for your next West coast trip.


I remember the devastation was so large we spent a day just driving through it.  It was that expansive.  It certainly let me know what mother nature was capable of.
 
NFA [TotalFark]
2014-05-18 10:02:51 PM  
I was 20 and I remember it clearly.  Enless video images on TV of ash falling from the sky clogging roads.  Lots of stories, especially about the guy who lived on the mountain and refused to leave.
 
2014-05-18 10:21:50 PM  

NFA: I was 20 and I remember it clearly.  Enless video images on TV of ash falling from the sky clogging roads.  Lots of stories, especially about the guy who lived on the mountain and refused to leave.


The late Harry Truman.
 
2014-05-18 10:25:55 PM  
34 years? really? weird. That means I was seven. I actually remember tv news of it.
(might just be one of my earliest memory)
 
2014-05-18 10:26:54 PM  
I was not quite seven months old.  I vaguely remember seeing Walter Cronkite saying something about it along with something about President Carter while I was sitting in my high chair and Mom was feeding me.

OK, so I made up the part about seeing the volcano.  But I clearly remember the high chair and Jimmy Carter, and I clearly remember wondering who the fark that strange man was talking about the news instead of the familiar old face I'd grown accustomed to seeing on WJXT.
 
2014-05-18 10:45:10 PM  
I was 3 and living in New England, so I don't remember it as it happened.  I was probably beating up my baby brother at the time

I do have a rock from the eruption given to me from one of my college professors.
 
2014-05-18 10:47:14 PM  

Speaker2Animals: And before you whippersnappers come in to piss on OBD's claim he heard it 200 miles away, know that Krakatoa was heard 3,000 miles away.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krakatoa


Krakatoa, that's east of Java,right?
 
2014-05-18 10:55:52 PM  
I can still recall old Mr. Barnslow getting out that morning
and nailing a fresh load of tadpoles to that old board of his.  
Then he spun it round and round, like a wheel of fortune,and no
matter where it stopped he'd yell out, "Tadpoles!  Tadpoles is the Messiah!"  
We all thought he was crazy.  
But then, we had some growing up to do.
 
2014-05-18 11:24:39 PM  
I'd been married for 2 months. Wife (now ex) had just had a stillbirth a week before.
 
2014-05-18 11:25:19 PM  
I was two years old and we were stationed at Ft. Knox, KY.  I don't recall the event itself, but a few years later, I that issue of NatGeo was my favorite to flip through.

When we were stationed at Ft. Lewis in '89, that was one of the first places we went to visit.  Amazing.
 
2014-05-18 11:49:39 PM  
I was about to graduate from high school in Texas so I really wasn't paying much any attention to anything else.  I do remember the beautiful sunsets, though.
 
2014-05-19 12:17:57 AM  

Solid State Vittles: zerkalo: I was ten, living in Spokane. That Sunday morning, I was at a friend's house, having spent the night. We were going to go the annual airshow at Fairchild AFB. While approaching the base, we could see the black ash cloud approaching from the west. We turned around and headed home. My friend ended up staying with us for a few days since we couldn't drive him home.

I still have a peanut butter jar with some ash somewhere.

/submitter

It's amazing how you have still pristine forests on one side and total annihilation on the other. It's really farking cool.


There are trees right at the edge of the blast zone where one side is burned and dead and the other side is alive and green.
 
2014-05-19 03:52:06 AM  
I remember being about 4 years old, and waking up all excited because we were going to be doing my birthday celebration that day, but my mom was watching the morning (afternoon?) news, crying.  It's the last time I can remember her, I think.  She passed away a few months later.
 
2014-05-19 07:01:11 AM  
I was in North Dakota.  Got a decent dusting of ash.  Now live in Washington and take the drive up there every once in a while.
 
2014-05-19 07:53:02 AM  

RatMaster999: I don't recall the event itself, but a few years later, I that issue of NatGeo was my favorite to flip through.


Ditto, loved that issue.
 
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