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    More: Interesting, Kepler space telescope, NASA Headquarters, amateur astronomy, Kepler, star clusters, implements, red dwarfs, BBC World News  
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1962 clicks; posted to Geek » on 18 May 2014 at 1:40 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



19 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2014-05-18 02:33:36 PM  
Duck Season.
 
2014-05-18 02:36:32 PM  
It's wock season.
 
2014-05-18 02:48:37 PM  
where's the kaboom?

/there was supposed to be an earth shattering kaboom
 
2014-05-18 02:57:36 PM  
FTA:
"the telescope was launched in 2009 to search for Earth-sized planets orbiting nearby stars and harboring liquid water, a necessity for life. "

NO. Kepler's goal was to find planets that COULD POTENTIALLY harbor liquid water because their distance from the host stars was similar to Earth's (the distance varies depending on the stellar properties).  Kepler could not determine whether the planets it found actually  had liquid water. Only telescopes with spectroscopic capabilities (like Hubble) can actually do that.
 
2014-05-18 03:34:00 PM  
Glad to see the reaction wheel plan is working. I don't know how predictable solar winds are so I thought the plan sounded a little unlikely at first.
 
2014-05-18 03:35:43 PM  
(Also does anyone remember Sobek from Star Trek? I would've sworn there was a Vulcan named Sobek, but in the show not the books. All I can find is this: http://en.memory-alpha.org/wiki/My_Enemy,_My_Ally#Characters)
 
2014-05-18 03:38:07 PM  

chard: FTA:
"the telescope was launched in 2009 to search for Earth-sized planets orbiting nearby stars and harboring liquid water, a necessity for life. "

NO. Kepler's goal was to find planets that COULD POTENTIALLY harbor liquid water because their distance from the host stars was similar to Earth's (the distance varies depending on the stellar properties).  Kepler could not determine whether the planets it found actually  had liquid water. Only telescopes with spectroscopic capabilities (like Hubble) can actually do that.


Add to this that a planet in such a zone may have lost its atmosphere (and water).

The Kepler telescope 'broke' a year ago, but is still 'finding' planets as scientists dig through collected data. The biggest lesson to the public from Kepler is that other stars have planets, those planets may have life, and we should nuke them, nuke them now and steal their things.
 
2014-05-18 03:48:38 PM  

UsikFark: chard: FTA:
"the telescope was launched in 2009 to search for Earth-sized planets orbiting nearby stars and harboring liquid water, a necessity for life. "

NO. Kepler's goal was to find planets that COULD POTENTIALLY harbor liquid water because their distance from the host stars was similar to Earth's (the distance varies depending on the stellar properties).  Kepler could not determine whether the planets it found actually  had liquid water. Only telescopes with spectroscopic capabilities (like Hubble) can actually do that.

Add to this that a planet in such a zone may have lost its atmosphere (and water).

The Kepler telescope 'broke' a year ago, but is still 'finding' planets as scientists dig through collected data. The biggest lesson to the public from Kepler is that other stars have planets, those planets may have life, and we should nuke them, nuke them now and steal their things.


According to TFA, they have approved a new search using a reduced number of gyroscopes, so Kepler will soon be gathering even more data.
 
2014-05-18 03:54:44 PM  

Mad_Radhu: UsikFark: chard: FTA:
"the telescope was launched in 2009 to search for Earth-sized planets orbiting nearby stars and harboring liquid water, a necessity for life. "

NO. Kepler's goal was to find planets that COULD POTENTIALLY harbor liquid water because their distance from the host stars was similar to Earth's (the distance varies depending on the stellar properties).  Kepler could not determine whether the planets it found actually  had liquid water. Only telescopes with spectroscopic capabilities (like Hubble) can actually do that.

Add to this that a planet in such a zone may have lost its atmosphere (and water).

The Kepler telescope 'broke' a year ago, but is still 'finding' planets as scientists dig through collected data. The biggest lesson to the public from Kepler is that other stars have planets, those planets may have life, and we should nuke them, nuke them now and steal their things.

According to TFA, they have approved a new search using a reduced number of gyroscopes, so Kepler will soon be gathering even more data.


I know, I read the article.
 
2014-05-18 04:18:32 PM  

BalugaJoe: Duck Season.


WABBIT season!
 
2014-05-18 04:55:20 PM  
It should reject the first 36.8% of the planets.
 
2014-05-18 09:56:13 PM  

Fark like a Barsoomian: (Also does anyone remember Sobek from Star Trek? I would've sworn there was a Vulcan named Sobek, but in the show not the books. All I can find is this: http://en.memory-alpha.org/wiki/My_Enemy,_My_Ally#Characters)


Sopek was a Vulcan on ST:ENT

http://en.memory-alpha.org/wiki/Sopek
 
2014-05-18 10:14:56 PM  

bluorangefyre: BalugaJoe: Duck Season.

WABBIT season!


PLANET season!
 
2014-05-19 12:02:40 AM  

chard: FTA:
"the telescope was launched in 2009 to search for Earth-sized planets orbiting nearby stars and harboring liquid water, a necessity for life. "

NO. Kepler's goal was to find planets that COULD POTENTIALLY harbor liquid water because their distance from the host stars was similar to Earth's (the distance varies depending on the stellar properties).  Kepler could not determine whether the planets it found actually  had liquid water. Only telescopes with spectroscopic capabilities (like Hubble) can actually do that.


Too bad we can't get the James Webb telescope faster.
 
2014-05-19 01:07:02 AM  
too bad we don't have some sort of space vehicle that could go up with a crew and repair the problem...
that is too scifi to dream about, gotta keep grounded in reality ;D
let the ruskies do it...
 
2014-05-19 01:29:05 AM  

bullsballs: too bad we don't have some sort of space vehicle that could go up with a crew and repair the problem...
that is too scifi to dream about, gotta keep grounded in reality ;D
let the ruskies do it...


Kepler is in a heliocentric orbit trailing the earth.  There is no vehicle, past or present, designed to make such a trip.
 
2014-05-19 12:06:04 PM  

John Nash: bullsballs: too bad we don't have some sort of space vehicle that could go up with a crew and repair the problem...
that is too scifi to dream about, gotta keep grounded in reality ;D
let the ruskies do it...

Kepler is in a heliocentric orbit trailing the earth.  There is no vehicle, past or present, designed to make such a trip.



Wellllll, not to make such a trip and return.

Kepler itself, of course, was designed to get into that particular heliocentric orbit. Several vehicles to study the sun were successfully sent up too..  Snoopy (LM-4)'s ascent stage [from Apollo 10] is the only one that neither crashed into the Moon nor burned up in Earth's atmosphere; it remains in a heliocentric orbit.
 
2014-05-19 03:41:54 PM  

LordOfThePings: It should reject the first 36.8% of the planets.


img2.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2014-05-19 07:23:25 PM  

whither_apophis: Sopek was a Vulcan on ST:ENT

http://en.memory-alpha.org/wiki/Sopek


Brilliant!
 
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