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(Globe and Mail)   "You can't destroy a community like this. My heart goes out to kids with autism. But no one told me they'd be leaving the house"   (theglobeandmail.com) divider line 144
    More: Dumbass, Doug Ford, implements  
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12417 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 May 2014 at 1:07 PM (14 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-05-18 09:17:04 AM
HEY DOUG.  NOW YOU KNOW HOW ROB'S NEIGHBOURS FEEL.

He just doubled down on CP24 about the property values going down $100k.
img.fark.net
What an asshat.
 
2014-05-18 09:59:06 AM
I had no idea that there were Canadians that were utterly horrible people without any redeeming qualities whatsoever.
 
2014-05-18 10:05:31 AM

Marcus Aurelius: I had no idea that there were Canadians that were utterly horrible people without any redeeming qualities whatsoever.


Believe it.
 
2014-05-18 10:18:47 AM

Marcus Aurelius: I had no idea that there were Canadians that were utterly horrible people without any redeeming qualities whatsoever.


I blame American 'Reality' TV.
(not really)

The whole family is ugly, but Doug Ford takes it to a whole new level.  Rob at least has a thin veneer of charm, Doug never considered that a social grace worth adopting.
 
2014-05-18 12:36:00 PM
It's a little more complicated than that,  subby.

I watched the neighbourhood I grew up in completely changed by a "multi-treatment facility".  It was a quiet place, people were nice, we kids could play outside, nobody got broken in on... nice neighbourhood.  Very suburban.  Then, we got a group home.  What can I say - mentally ill teenagers act out.  Within 3 months, there were break-ins, cars keyed, fights in the alleyway, teenage kids on "free time" terrorizing the kids from the neighbourhood, cops being called day and night, ambulances pulling up day and night... it did ruin the neighbourhood.  The first argument from the workers was that everyone were just prejudiced against the mentally ill, and no one could prove it was "their" kids doing that stuff.  So some neighbours got security cameras and caught the little bastards red-handed.  Then the tune changed to "need for tolerance and understanding".  But it's hard to be tolerant when your home has lost thousands in value and your family no longer feel safe.  And even if the kid got sent to juvie, another one came in.  The behaviours didn't change.

So, yes - if I'd spent 30 years paying off a mortgage on a house in a nice neighbourhood, and those kinds of behaviours started happening because a group home came in, I'd be pissed off, too.

That said, there is a need for better mental health services, especially for juveniles.  I'd like to see a tiered approach by which more levels are added, so that the kids who are placed in group homes in nicer neighbourhoods are ready to function socially there.  But maybe we should concentrate on actually offering mental health services first.
 
2014-05-18 12:54:33 PM

Benevolent Misanthrope: It's a little more complicated than that,  subby.

I watched the neighbourhood I grew up in completely changed by a "multi-treatment facility".  It was a quiet place, people were nice, we kids could play outside, nobody got broken in on... nice neighbourhood.  Very suburban.  Then, we got a group home.  What can I say - mentally ill teenagers act out.  Within 3 months, there were break-ins, cars keyed, fights in the alleyway, teenage kids on "free time" terrorizing the kids from the neighbourhood, cops being called day and night, ambulances pulling up day and night... it did ruin the neighbourhood.  The first argument from the workers was that everyone were just prejudiced against the mentally ill, and no one could prove it was "their" kids doing that stuff.  So some neighbours got security cameras and caught the little bastards red-handed.  Then the tune changed to "need for tolerance and understanding".  But it's hard to be tolerant when your home has lost thousands in value and your family no longer feel safe.  And even if the kid got sent to juvie, another one came in.  The behaviours didn't change.

So, yes - if I'd spent 30 years paying off a mortgage on a house in a nice neighbourhood, and those kinds of behaviours started happening because a group home came in, I'd be pissed off, too.

That said, there is a need for better mental health services, especially for juveniles.  I'd like to see a tiered approach by which more levels are added, so that the kids who are placed in group homes in nicer neighbourhoods are ready to function socially there.  But maybe we should concentrate on actually offering mental health services first.


But the bad ones can go to the bad neighborhoods freely? NIMBY is crap. It doesn't matter location, it obviously matters what treatment and services these kids are getting. Sounds like they need more of both, and better supervision.
 
2014-05-18 01:04:40 PM

unyon: Marcus Aurelius: I had no idea that there were Canadians that were utterly horrible people without any redeeming qualities whatsoever.

Believe it.


Beliebe it.
 
2014-05-18 01:12:16 PM

Marcus Aurelius: I had no idea that there were Canadians that were utterly horrible people without any redeeming qualities whatsoever.


You haven't been in the NHL playoff threads, have you.
 
2014-05-18 01:16:11 PM

SecretAgentWoman: But the bad ones can go to the bad neighborhoods freely? NIMBY is crap. It doesn't matter location, it obviously matters what treatment and services these kids are getting. Sounds like they need more of both, and better supervision.


I was more thinking islands.
 
2014-05-18 01:16:35 PM
You know the phrase "waste of skin" gets tossed around a lot these days, but when it comes to the Ford clan I don't think there is a single redeemable one of them.
 
2014-05-18 01:17:36 PM
Ford is quoted as saying it was unacceptable to have emergency vehicles parked on the street outside the home

Ok well you can quote me saying the same thing. I can still remember every time I've seen that happen while I'm trying to sleep, and I'm sure it's unsettling if it happens during the day. Of course this is a bad idea.

I've never understood how NIMBY became a bad word.
 
2014-05-18 01:18:37 PM
WTF is so very wrong with that family? Defective chromazone? Gypsy curse?
 
2014-05-18 01:21:27 PM

Benevolent Misanthrope: It's a little more complicated than that,  subby.

I watched the neighbourhood I grew up in completely changed by a "multi-treatment facility".  It was a quiet place, people were nice, we kids could play outside, nobody got broken in on... nice neighbourhood.  Very suburban.  Then, we got a group home.  What can I say - mentally ill teenagers act out.  Within 3 months, there were break-ins, cars keyed, fights in the alleyway, teenage kids on "free time" terrorizing the kids from the neighbourhood, cops being called day and night, ambulances pulling up day and night... it did ruin the neighbourhood.  The first argument from the workers was that everyone were just prejudiced against the mentally ill, and no one could prove it was "their" kids doing that stuff.  So some neighbours got security cameras and caught the little bastards red-handed.  Then the tune changed to "need for tolerance and understanding".  But it's hard to be tolerant when your home has lost thousands in value and your family no longer feel safe.  And even if the kid got sent to juvie, another one came in.  The behaviours didn't change.

So, yes - if I'd spent 30 years paying off a mortgage on a house in a nice neighbourhood, and those kinds of behaviours started happening because a group home came in, I'd be pissed off, too.

That said, there is a need for better mental health services, especially for juveniles.  I'd like to see a tiered approach by which more levels are added, so that the kids who are placed in group homes in nicer neighbourhoods are ready to function socially there.  But maybe we should concentrate on actually offering mental health services first.


This story smells a lot like Reagan's "Welfare Queen" bullsh*t.

I suppose you wouldn't be happy until all those kids were sent off to leper colonies.
 
2014-05-18 01:24:44 PM

TV's Vinnie: WTF is so very wrong with that family? Defective chromazone? Gypsy curse?


i1.ytimg.com
 
2014-05-18 01:24:51 PM

Benevolent Misanthrope: It's a little more complicated than that,  subby.

I watched the neighbourhood I grew up in completely changed by a "multi-treatment facility".  It was a quiet place, people were nice, we kids could play outside, nobody got broken in on... nice neighbourhood.  Very suburban.  Then, we got a group home.  What can I say - mentally ill teenagers act out.  Within 3 months, there were break-ins, cars keyed, fights in the alleyway, teenage kids on "free time" terrorizing the kids from the neighbourhood, cops being called day and night, ambulances pulling up day and night... it did ruin the neighbourhood.  The first argument from the workers was that everyone were just prejudiced against the mentally ill, and no one could prove it was "their" kids doing that stuff.  So some neighbours got security cameras and caught the little bastards red-handed.  Then the tune changed to "need for tolerance and understanding".  But it's hard to be tolerant when your home has lost thousands in value and your family no longer feel safe.  And even if the kid got sent to juvie, another one came in.  The behaviours didn't change.

So, yes - if I'd spent 30 years paying off a mortgage on a house in a nice neighbourhood, and those kinds of behaviours started happening because a group home came in, I'd be pissed off, too.

That said, there is a need for better mental health services, especially for juveniles.  I'd like to see a tiered approach by which more levels are added, so that the kids who are placed in group homes in nicer neighbourhoods are ready to function socially there.  But maybe we should concentrate on actually offering mental health services first.


No, it's not.

I'm just going to leave this here, it is a Statement from a long time friend of the family that is also running for Mayor of Toronto...  (link goes to full statement.)
"Doug Ford's comments are deeply regrettable and from another age. For years, it was thought the best way to help people with disabilities, including those with autism, was to place them in large institutions - a kind of confinement away from the community...

Property values were as hurt by the ugly ass addition Doug put on his place as anything else in that neighbourhood. Period.  He lives on a nice-ish street but only just a few streets away is low income public housing with gangs and more drugs than his brother could ever consume.
 
2014-05-18 01:25:27 PM

Fark like a Barsoomian: Ford is quoted as saying it was unacceptable to have emergency vehicles parked on the street outside the home

Ok well you can quote me saying the same thing. I can still remember every time I've seen that happen while I'm trying to sleep, and I'm sure it's unsettling if it happens during the day. Of course this is a bad idea.

I've never understood how NIMBY became a bad word.


Because it is. People want the benefits of modern infrastructure just as long as anything perceived as "negative" is "stuck where the poor/dark people are".

Oakville and Burlington are two of the Nimbiest of Nimby communities in Southern Ontario. Worse than GTA and Mississauga.
 
2014-05-18 01:26:22 PM
TV's Vinnie:

This story smells a lot like Reagan's "Welfare Queen" bullsh*t.

I suppose you wouldn't be happy until all those kids were sent off to leper colonies.


Holy shiat.  Someone lays out a completely rational argument about this issue and this is your response?

Not every kid with developmental issues is sweet and nice as they are portrayed on TV and internet glurge stories.  Some of these kids have serious, deep-rooted problems.  He is absolutely on the money that more mental health care is needed in North America.
 
2014-05-18 01:26:29 PM

Katolu: Benevolent Misanthrope: It's a little more complicated than that,  subby.

I watched the neighbourhood I grew up in completely changed by a "multi-treatment facility".  It was a quiet place, people were nice, we kids could play outside, nobody got broken in on... nice neighbourhood.  Very suburban.  Then, we got a group home.  What can I say - mentally ill teenagers act out.  Within 3 months, there were break-ins, cars keyed, fights in the alleyway, teenage kids on "free time" terrorizing the kids from the neighbourhood, cops being called day and night, ambulances pulling up day and night... it did ruin the neighbourhood.  The first argument from the workers was that everyone were just prejudiced against the mentally ill, and no one could prove it was "their" kids doing that stuff.  So some neighbours got security cameras and caught the little bastards red-handed.  Then the tune changed to "need for tolerance and understanding".  But it's hard to be tolerant when your home has lost thousands in value and your family no longer feel safe.  And even if the kid got sent to juvie, another one came in.  The behaviours didn't change.

So, yes - if I'd spent 30 years paying off a mortgage on a house in a nice neighbourhood, and those kinds of behaviours started happening because a group home came in, I'd be pissed off, too.

That said, there is a need for better mental health services, especially for juveniles.  I'd like to see a tiered approach by which more levels are added, so that the kids who are placed in group homes in nicer neighbourhoods are ready to function socially there.  But maybe we should concentrate on actually offering mental health services first.

Yeah, and the uppity blacks and dirty messicans messed up my neighborhood.


What do you have against gentrification?  You must be one of THOSE types of people.
 
2014-05-18 01:27:07 PM

BizarreMan: unyon: Marcus Aurelius: I had no idea that there were Canadians that were utterly horrible people without any redeeming qualities whatsoever.

Believe it.

Beliebe it.


His only redeeming quality is a face I want to mouth-fark. That's it. 

/Bieber, not Doug Ford
 
2014-05-18 01:28:00 PM

sno man: Benevolent Misanthrope: It's a little more complicated than that,  subby.

I watched the neighbourhood I grew up in completely changed by a "multi-treatment facility".  It was a quiet place, people were nice, we kids could play outside, nobody got broken in on... nice neighbourhood.  Very suburban.  Then, we got a group home.  What can I say - mentally ill teenagers act out.  Within 3 months, there were break-ins, cars keyed, fights in the alleyway, teenage kids on "free time" terrorizing the kids from the neighbourhood, cops being called day and night, ambulances pulling up day and night... it did ruin the neighbourhood.  The first argument from the workers was that everyone were just prejudiced against the mentally ill, and no one could prove it was "their" kids doing that stuff.  So some neighbours got security cameras and caught the little bastards red-handed.  Then the tune changed to "need for tolerance and understanding".  But it's hard to be tolerant when your home has lost thousands in value and your family no longer feel safe.  And even if the kid got sent to juvie, another one came in.  The behaviours didn't change.

So, yes - if I'd spent 30 years paying off a mortgage on a house in a nice neighbourhood, and those kinds of behaviours started happening because a group home came in, I'd be pissed off, too.

That said, there is a need for better mental health services, especially for juveniles.  I'd like to see a tiered approach by which more levels are added, so that the kids who are placed in group homes in nicer neighbourhoods are ready to function socially there.  But maybe we should concentrate on actually offering mental health services first.

No, it's not.

I'm just going to leave this here, it is a Statement from a long time friend of the family that is also running for Mayor of Toronto...  (link goes to full statement.)
"Doug Ford's comments are deeply regrettable and from another age. For years, it was thought the best way to help people with dis ...


The comment you are responding to is the poster's personal experiences with a treatment center in his own neighborhood, not Doug Ford's.
 
2014-05-18 01:28:10 PM
Wow, that's some grade A deductive reasoning there. Strawman much?
 
2014-05-18 01:29:02 PM

SecretAgentWoman: Benevolent Misanthrope: It's a little more complicated than that,  subby.

I watched the neighbourhood I grew up in completely changed by a "multi-treatment facility".  It was a quiet place, people were nice, we kids could play outside, nobody got broken in on... nice neighbourhood.  Very suburban.  Then, we got a group home.  What can I say - mentally ill teenagers act out.  Within 3 months, there were break-ins, cars keyed, fights in the alleyway, teenage kids on "free time" terrorizing the kids from the neighbourhood, cops being called day and night, ambulances pulling up day and night... it did ruin the neighbourhood.  The first argument from the workers was that everyone were just prejudiced against the mentally ill, and no one could prove it was "their" kids doing that stuff.  So some neighbours got security cameras and caught the little bastards red-handed.  Then the tune changed to "need for tolerance and understanding".  But it's hard to be tolerant when your home has lost thousands in value and your family no longer feel safe.  And even if the kid got sent to juvie, another one came in.  The behaviours didn't change.

So, yes - if I'd spent 30 years paying off a mortgage on a house in a nice neighbourhood, and those kinds of behaviours started happening because a group home came in, I'd be pissed off, too.

That said, there is a need for better mental health services, especially for juveniles.  I'd like to see a tiered approach by which more levels are added, so that the kids who are placed in group homes in nicer neighbourhoods are ready to function socially there.  But maybe we should concentrate on actually offering mental health services first.

But the bad ones can go to the bad neighborhoods freely? NIMBY is crap. It doesn't matter location, it obviously matters what treatment and services these kids are getting. Sounds like they need more of both, and better supervision.


No, that's not my meaning and stop intentionally taking out of context.

Group homes are placed in quiet, peaceful neighbourhoods so that the kids can have that kind of environment to positively influence them.  Also to help them adapt to life in society at large rather than in an institution.  There should be more help for them to acclimate before they are thrown into a social situation they are unprepared for.  Even a nicer neighbourhood situation - it would be helpful to both sets of stakeholders, the kids and the neighbourhood.

Sure, IMBY.  As long as they don't rip off my stuff or otherwise act in unacceptable ways with impunity.
 
2014-05-18 01:33:16 PM
Are there no workhouses?
 
2014-05-18 01:33:22 PM

MattyFridays: sno man: Benevolent Misanthrope: It's a little more complicated than that,  subby.

I watched the neighbourhood I grew up in completely changed by a "multi-treatment facility".  It was a quiet place, people were nice, we kids could play outside, nobody got broken in on... nice neighbourhood.  Very suburban.  Then, we got a group home.  What can I say - mentally ill teenagers act out.  Within 3 months, there were break-ins, cars keyed, fights in the alleyway, teenage kids on "free time" terrorizing the kids from the neighbourhood, cops being called day and night, ambulances pulling up day and night... it did ruin the neighbourhood.  The first argument from the workers was that everyone were just prejudiced against the mentally ill, and no one could prove it was "their" kids doing that stuff.  So some neighbours got security cameras and caught the little bastards red-handed.  Then the tune changed to "need for tolerance and understanding".  But it's hard to be tolerant when your home has lost thousands in value and your family no longer feel safe.  And even if the kid got sent to juvie, another one came in.  The behaviours didn't change.

So, yes - if I'd spent 30 years paying off a mortgage on a house in a nice neighbourhood, and those kinds of behaviours started happening because a group home came in, I'd be pissed off, too.

That said, there is a need for better mental health services, especially for juveniles.  I'd like to see a tiered approach by which more levels are added, so that the kids who are placed in group homes in nicer neighbourhoods are ready to function socially there.  But maybe we should concentrate on actually offering mental health services first.

No, it's not.

I'm just going to leave this here, it is a Statement from a long time friend of the family that is also running for Mayor of Toronto...  (link goes to full statement.)
"Doug Ford's comments are deeply regrettable and from another age. For years, it was thought the best way to help people ...


And in this case, the one from the article, Doug Ford's, no it is not more complicated.  I do agree that both counties need to do much more for mental health though.
 
2014-05-18 01:36:08 PM
Ford, whose ward is in the west-end, is quoted as saying it was unacceptable to have emergency vehicles parked on the street outside the home and that the home should be relocated. "You've ruined the community," Ford is quoted by the Guardian as telling the facility's staff.

i.chzbgr.com
 
2014-05-18 01:38:29 PM

Benevolent Misanthrope: No, that's not my meaning and stop intentionally taking out of context.Group homes are placed in quiet, peaceful neighbourhoods so that the kids can have that kind of environment to positively influence them. Also to help them adapt to life in society at large rather than in an institution. There should be more help for them to acclimate before they are thrown into a social situation they are unprepared for. Even a nicer neighbourhood situation - it would be helpful to both sets of stakeholders, the kids and the neighbourhood.Sure, IMBY. As long as they don't rip off my stuff or otherwise act in unacceptable ways with impunity.


I'm with you. People acting like it's a travesty to even bring up any negative impacts such a home has on a neighborhood are just as bad as Ford. If you want to have a dialog then everything needs to be on the table for discussion. The moment you start shouting people down for bringing up an uncomfortable fact it's no longer an honest discussion.
 
2014-05-18 01:39:22 PM
Why did you have to move to Canada and make them look like shiat?
 
2014-05-18 01:40:33 PM
Foot-in-mouth disease seems to run in this family.
 
2014-05-18 01:43:03 PM
It would be best for the ford bros if THEY were in a group home of some sort
 
2014-05-18 01:45:33 PM
I'm sure there is more to this story than we are hearing.

The kids parents farktards since they let him get autism so who knows what else is going on with that family.
 
2014-05-18 01:46:13 PM
I know where these people live.  Ford lives on Edenbridge Dr, just south of Scarlett and Eglinton.  It is a very nice neighborhood, what with James Gardens and all, but there is not a single nice neighborhood in Toronto that is far enough bad neighborhoods for crime and break-ins to not be a problem.  For them, it is the Dixon/Islington area, which ironically is where the house that the first Ford crack video was shot.
 
2014-05-18 01:46:15 PM
sigh
 
2014-05-18 01:47:21 PM
It does seem like this ford guy is atleast familiar with mental instability
 
2014-05-18 01:48:55 PM
I live two blocks from a homeless shelter. We receive maybe 3-5 sex offender notices per week. I'll trade you.
 
2014-05-18 01:50:01 PM

Benevolent Misanthrope: It's a little more complicated than that,  subby.

I watched the neighbourhood I grew up in completely changed by a "multi-treatment facility".  It was a quiet place, people were nice, we kids could play outside, nobody got broken in on... nice neighbourhood.  Very suburban.  Then, we got a group home.  What can I say - mentally ill teenagers act out.  Within 3 months, there were break-ins, cars keyed, fights in the alleyway, teenage kids on "free time" terrorizing the kids from the neighbourhood, cops being called day and night, ambulances pulling up day and night... it did ruin the neighbourhood.  The first argument from the workers was that everyone were just prejudiced against the mentally ill, and no one could prove it was "their" kids doing that stuff.  So some neighbours got security cameras and caught the little bastards red-handed.  Then the tune changed to "need for tolerance and understanding".  But it's hard to be tolerant when your home has lost thousands in value and your family no longer feel safe.  And even if the kid got sent to juvie, another one came in.  The behaviours didn't change.

So, yes - if I'd spent 30 years paying off a mortgage on a house in a nice neighbourhood, and those kinds of behaviours started happening because a group home came in, I'd be pissed off, too.

That said, there is a need for better mental health services, especially for juveniles.  I'd like to see a tiered approach by which more levels are added, so that the kids who are placed in group homes in nicer neighbourhoods are ready to function socially there.  But maybe we should concentrate on actually offering mental health services first.


I thought we were talking about a house for 5 autistic kids, not a group home for troubled teens?
 
2014-05-18 01:53:56 PM
I usually don't advocate for savage, vigilante street justice a la a Jean Claude Van Dam Movie.

Usually.
 
2014-05-18 01:55:47 PM

SecretAgentWoman: But the bad ones can go to the bad neighborhoods freely? NIMBY is crap. It doesn't matter location, it obviously matters what treatment and services these kids are getting. Sounds like they need more of both, and better supervision.


Until it's your back yard.
 
2014-05-18 01:58:16 PM

Ghastly: Fark like a Barsoomian: Ford is quoted as saying it was unacceptable to have emergency vehicles parked on the street outside the home

Ok well you can quote me saying the same thing. I can still remember every time I've seen that happen while I'm trying to sleep, and I'm sure it's unsettling if it happens during the day. Of course this is a bad idea.

I've never understood how NIMBY became a bad word.

Because it is. People want the benefits of modern infrastructure just as long as anything perceived as "negative" is "stuck where the poor/dark people are".

Oakville and Burlington are two of the Nimbiest of Nimby communities in Southern Ontario. Worse than GTA and Mississauga.


Guelph looks down from it's place atop the NIMBY throne and laughs at that comment.
 
2014-05-18 02:00:06 PM
We have one of these homes being built in our neighborhood currently.  Being we live on an emergency access road for fire, police, and medical with a firestation at the end of the block, and no sidewalks on the road, this could get entertainingly bloody.
 
2014-05-18 02:00:42 PM

Benevolent Misanthrope: It's a little more complicated than that,  subby.

I watched the neighbourhood I grew up in completely changed by a "multi-treatment facility".  It was a quiet place, people were nice, we kids could play outside, nobody got broken in on... nice neighbourhood.  Very suburban.  Then, we got a group home.  What can I say - mentally ill teenagers act out.  Within 3 months, there were break-ins, cars keyed, fights in the alleyway, teenage kids on "free time" terrorizing the kids from the neighbourhood, cops being called day and night, ambulances pulling up day and night... it did ruin the neighbourhood.  The first argument from the workers was that everyone were just prejudiced against the mentally ill, and no one could prove it was "their" kids doing that stuff.  So some neighbours got security cameras and caught the little bastards red-handed.  Then the tune changed to "need for tolerance and understanding".  But it's hard to be tolerant when your home has lost thousands in value and your family no longer feel safe.  And even if the kid got sent to juvie, another one came in.  The behaviours didn't change.

So, yes - if I'd spent 30 years paying off a mortgage on a house in a nice neighbourhood, and those kinds of behaviours started happening because a group home came in, I'd be pissed off, too.

That said, there is a need for better mental health services, especially for juveniles.  I'd like to see a tiered approach by which more levels are added, so that the kids who are placed in group homes in nicer neighbourhoods are ready to function socially there.  But maybe we should concentrate on actually offering mental health services first.


The problem is, severely troubled kids who are non-violent end up getting treated the same way as the violent cases, who earn "free time" for good behavior, just want to go to the corner store to get a pop and candy bar and have to deal with being treated like crap by the community at large because of things they'd never do..


Then when the kid gets frustrated because even though they're trying, they still get treated like crap.. so they might start acting out on their own... yeah.


Our race really sucks at leaving one another the fark alone.
 
2014-05-18 02:01:43 PM
You know what I don't want in my neighbourhood? Violent, racist, drunk-driving crackheads. Sadly, I live in Toronto.
 
2014-05-18 02:02:50 PM

moeburn: I thought we were talking about a house for 5 autistic kids, not a group home for troubled teens?


Ever been attacked by an autistic kid? My friends kid is autistic and pretty okay most of the time but one time when the mom was visiting he went from zero the feral in about two seconds. Full on primate biting, scratching, feral rage. He also got thrown out of the local school's special ed program when he bit one of the handlers so hard the woman had to go to the hospital for stitches.

They're not all Rain Man.
 
2014-05-18 02:05:22 PM
I know how to solve this: let's put these kids in purpose-built facilities, we'll call them "camps". Then to make sure they can't bother the neighbors, let's put up a barrier, we'll call it a "fence". To keep them from escaping we can put people, we'll call them "guards", in taller structures so they can see what's going on, those we will call "guard-towers".
 
2014-05-18 02:06:11 PM

moeburn: Benevolent Misanthrope: It's a little more complicated than that,  subby.

I watched the neighbourhood I grew up in completely changed by a "multi-treatment facility".  It was a quiet place, people were nice, we kids could play outside, nobody got broken in on... nice neighbourhood.  Very suburban.  Then, we got a group home.  What can I say - mentally ill teenagers act out.  Within 3 months, there were break-ins, cars keyed, fights in the alleyway, teenage kids on "free time" terrorizing the kids from the neighbourhood, cops being called day and night, ambulances pulling up day and night... it did ruin the neighbourhood.  The first argument from the workers was that everyone were just prejudiced against the mentally ill, and no one could prove it was "their" kids doing that stuff.  So some neighbours got security cameras and caught the little bastards red-handed.  Then the tune changed to "need for tolerance and understanding".  But it's hard to be tolerant when your home has lost thousands in value and your family no longer feel safe.  And even if the kid got sent to juvie, another one came in.  The behaviours didn't change.

So, yes - if I'd spent 30 years paying off a mortgage on a house in a nice neighbourhood, and those kinds of behaviours started happening because a group home came in, I'd be pissed off, too.

That said, there is a need for better mental health services, especially for juveniles.  I'd like to see a tiered approach by which more levels are added, so that the kids who are placed in group homes in nicer neighbourhoods are ready to function socially there.  But maybe we should concentrate on actually offering mental health services first.

I thought we were talking about a house for 5 autistic kids, not a group home for troubled teens?


It's a "multi-treatment facility" per TFA.
 
2014-05-18 02:11:40 PM

Monkeyhouse Zendo: Ever been attacked by an autistic kid? My friends kid is autistic and pretty okay most of the time but one time when the mom was visiting he went from zero the feral in about two seconds. Full on primate biting, scratching, feral rage. He also got thrown out of the local school's special ed program when he bit one of the handlers so hard the woman had to go to the hospital for stitches.


I deal with Autistic children every day. A good deal of the ill and injured children I transport are autistic.

They are not as violent or as hard to handle as you claim they are.

/and there are drugs for that.
 
2014-05-18 02:23:51 PM

hardinparamedic: Monkeyhouse Zendo: Ever been attacked by an autistic kid? My friends kid is autistic and pretty okay most of the time but one time when the mom was visiting he went from zero the feral in about two seconds. Full on primate biting, scratching, feral rage. He also got thrown out of the local school's special ed program when he bit one of the handlers so hard the woman had to go to the hospital for stitches.

I deal with Autistic children every day. A good deal of the ill and injured children I transport are autistic.

They are not as violent or as hard to handle as you claim they are.

/and there are drugs for that.


You both have a point. When you're used to being around autistic or handicapped people, especially the same individuals, you become much more accustomed to behavioral cues. Having said that, I did almost lose an eye to an autistic adult because there was a line for snacks. But I still don't mind the residential assistance facility that moved in next to my parent's house. Of course they're adults with minimal behavior issues.
 
2014-05-18 02:27:40 PM

Monkeyhouse Zendo: moeburn: I thought we were talking about a house for 5 autistic kids, not a group home for troubled teens?

Ever been attacked by an autistic kid? My friends kid is autistic and pretty okay most of the time but one time when the mom was visiting he went from zero the feral in about two seconds. Full on primate biting, scratching, feral rage. He also got thrown out of the local school's special ed program when he bit one of the handlers so hard the woman had to go to the hospital for stitches.

They're not all Rain Man.


So they get bitey? ZOMBIE AUTISTICS! So if an autistic kid becomes a zombie I wonder if the autism will negate some of the zombie symptoms. You still get a zombie and all but possibly articulate and not as jerky.
 
2014-05-18 02:27:41 PM
 
2014-05-18 02:28:01 PM

MattyFridays: TV's Vinnie:

This story smells a lot like Reagan's "Welfare Queen" bullsh*t.

I suppose you wouldn't be happy until all those kids were sent off to leper colonies.

Holy shiat.  Someone lays out a completely rational argument about this issue and this is your response?

Not every kid with developmental issues is sweet and nice as they are portrayed on TV and internet glurge stories.  Some of these kids have serious, deep-rooted problems.  He is absolutely on the money that more mental health care is needed in North America.


And by "more mental care", they mean "go back to warehousing em all into nuthouses and leave them to rot".
 
2014-05-18 02:28:51 PM
THERE'S TWO OF THEM?!!

/Ford's, I mean
 
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