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(Huffington Post)   Most food fads are stupid, but Subby is more than ready to bow down to our upcoming Poutine Overlords   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 11
    More: Spiffy, food fad  
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4169 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 May 2014 at 12:41 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-05-16 12:44:14 PM  
6 votes:

Tellingthem: Really? We've had popular variations here for ages. Cheese fries, Chili cheese fries, carna-asada fries, gravy fries, etc. Putting stuff on fries is hardly new.

"the breakfast poutine -- topped with bacon, sausage, scrambled eggs and served with a side of maple syrup "

But i guess simply putting stuff on fries and calling that "Poutine" is.


None of those things is poutine, and the reason it hasn't caught on fully is that Americans for some reason seem incapable of figuring that out.  I get that on paper it looks like any old fries and cheese and gravy would work.  But it's like saying a hamburger is essentially a steak because they're both beef.

  The fries you have down- but poutine is really about both the gravy and the cheese curd.  The gravy must be a beef gravy or derivative- Chicken stock can be used in up to a third to take a bit of beef edge off.  It's usually *slightly* thinner than the gravy you'd have with a pot roast and mashed potatoes- the viscosity needs to be such that it both clings to the fries, but also flows through and permeates all fry and cheese surfaces, since it is a secondary heat conduit for the cheese curds.

But here is where you are grossly mistaken- substituting cheddar or mozza or whatever other abortive american cheese product you want is simply not the same effect as cheese curds.  While technically cheddar, they behave much closer to what a fresher mozzarella would.

They are heated only by the fries and gravy themselves- therefore they become trapped in a state between being both solid cheese bombs, and stringy cheese clingons.  Because they are of widely varying size, and will become trapped at different temperatures in the poutine, you'll get a range of textures from the cheese, between firm and squeaky to gooey and stringy.

Once we get poutine out of the way, we're going to introduce you to the broad spectrum of bacon that you also seem to not grasp.
2014-05-16 11:11:38 AM  
4 votes:
We have a Big Cheese in Calgary, and a Smokes, along with dozens of other places that deal in poutine.

I will say this:  for all of the nacho and breakfast and perogy and what-have-you poutines, there isn't yet anything that bests the original fries, poutine gravy, and squeaky fresh cheese curds.  The only possible- POSSIBLE- addition that might be considered a reasonable accoutrement is montreal smoked meat.
2014-05-16 12:46:14 PM  
3 votes:

TuteTibiImperes: Tellingthem: Really? We've had popular variations here for ages. Cheese fries, Chili cheese fries, carna-asada fries, gravy fries, etc. Putting stuff on fries is hardly new.

"the breakfast poutine -- topped with bacon, sausage, scrambled eggs and served with a side of maple syrup "

But i guess simply putting stuff on fries and calling that "Poutine" is.

There's a BBQ place nearby that serves fries with sausage gravey ( the same kind as you'd use for biscuits and gravey).  That's more poutine-y than this guy's breakfast version.


If you have the right fries, gravy, and cheese curd, you can add whatever else you like and technically call it poutine (though not recommended).  If you don't have those three elements correct, it doesn't matter what you do, it ain't poutine.
2014-05-16 11:52:28 AM  
2 votes:
Well, crap.  Now that it's a fad in the US, it will be farking ruined.

unyon: We have a Big Cheese in Calgary, and a Smokes, along with dozens of other places that deal in poutine.

I will say this:  for all of the nacho and breakfast and perogy and what-have-you poutines, there isn't yet anything that bests the original fries, poutine gravy, and squeaky fresh cheese curds.  The only possible- POSSIBLE- addition that might be considered a reasonable accoutrement is montreal smoked meat.


I'd say not even that, really, or it becomes loaded fries.  The original is the best.  Everything else is just overkill or a different dish.  Just as a martini consists only of gin, vermouth and a Big Damn Olive, poutine consists only of fresh made fries, fresh squeaky cheese curds, and poutine gravy (which is a beef gravy thickened with corn starch instead of flour).  That's it.  That's ALL of it.

But now that it's going to be a US fad, poutine will be impossible to find in its original form soon.  It'll be all gold-pated duck fat poached Asian-inspired short rib of Kobe beef with Indian paneer and hand-cut artisanal veggie fries or something.
2014-05-16 01:29:16 PM  
1 votes:

Sin_City_Superhero: Yeah, I'd like to try some poutine. I don't think I've ever had cheese curds, but I do love cheese.


That's almost a crime... but be weary, lots of crap curds out there.

flucto: Poutine sounds awesome in theory but every time I've had it it's been a big disappointment. The gravy seems like it's out of a big can, the curds are just lumps of tasteless white nothing. The fries are flaccid.

And that's in a country where they allegedly care about poutine.


There's hundred of places that you can get some, but only a few that will truly be as good as it should be.

Honestly, done at home is almost the only way to really get it right.

Find a really good place for the cheese curds, they should be still warm at the cheese fromagerie (actual cheese makers/factory/store) when you pick them up.  There should be a bit of brine, and they have to be lightly salty and squeak a LOT when you eat a few pieces.  The pieces should be medium sized, not huge chunks, nor tiny bits.

The gravy is a very individual thing.  My preference is a good 1/2 turkey and 1/2 BBQ type gravy (powder).  If you have actual broth (chicken or turkey) it's even better.  The gravy has to be thick, but no overly so, it must be HOT, it needs to melt the cheese in contact.  The flavour should by strong and not overly salty like many cheap powder type gravy can be...so make sure that you get good quality stuff or make some from scratch.

The fries have to be the real thing, cut not too thick (many overdo the thickness) and deep fried properly... aka blanched, cooled and re-friend until golden done in Canola oil.  They should be very crispy and not oily at all.  Again, served at hot as possible.  Very lightly salted if you like salty, but it the curds and the gravy are right, you probably shouldn't need any.


For a special treat, before you add the gravy, add a good scoop of a very thick/chunky meat/vegetables spaghetti sauce (again, needs to be very hot).  The more meaty the sauce is, the better.

Yes, that is correct... the sauce does NOT replace the gravy, the gravy goes over it.
2014-05-16 12:59:18 PM  
1 votes:
ds_4815:Fox and Fiddle? Went there for the first time this week, had Korean BBQ pulled pork poutine, but a friend got the butter chicken one... had never seen it anywhere else prior.

No, Rose and Crown in Calgary.  It's off menu, but since both butter chicken and poutine are on-menu, it's easy for them.

Also, my ranked order of fast-food poutine if you dare to try such things:

1) A&W

2) Wendy's

100) KFC

∞) McDonald's


I don't actually have a problem with many fast food poutines.  they always get the fries right, and provided they're using the right cheese (which all of these are), then they're ok.  I would agree with A & W being the best of the bunch you listed, but I would put New York Fries' version above that.  I've only had KFC and Wendy's once, both were fine.  I didn't know you could get a poutine at McDonalds.

Cyberluddite:

Calories 1,065
Total Fat 57 g
Saturated Fat 15 g
Total Carbs 112 g
Sodium 1,485 mg
Cholesterol 68 mg

As fat as Americans are now, imagine how fat we would be if poutine were as common in the U.S. as it is in some parts of Canuckistan. I'm sure the makers of LipitorTM would be thrilled if that happened, though.


Let's get this out of the way- There's nothing, not a single thing, about poutine that is good for you.  It is starch with fat and salt, and entirely too much of all three of those things than a human should ingest.  It's only redeeming feature is that it is uncompromisingly delicious.  It's Canadian soul food.
2014-05-16 12:51:52 PM  
1 votes:
If I'm going to get my balls blown off for a word, that word isn't "poutine".

3.bp.blogspot.com

(clicks link) though that does look tasty.
2014-05-16 12:39:13 PM  
1 votes:
Poutine tastes awesome and I definitely try to eat it at least once every time I'm in Montreal or other Canuck areas where it's popular, but check out the "nutrional" information for one serving of poutine (don't know how big the serving size is) that I found on the internets:

Calories 1,065
Total Fat 57 g
Saturated Fat 15 g
Total Carbs 112 g
Sodium 1,485 mg
Cholesterol 68 mg

As fat as Americans are now, imagine how fat we would be if poutine were as common in the U.S. as it is in some parts of Canuckistan. I'm sure the makers of LipitorTM would be thrilled if that happened, though.
2014-05-16 12:16:32 PM  
1 votes:
Really? We've had popular variations here for ages. Cheese fries, Chili cheese fries, carna-asada fries, gravy fries, etc. Putting stuff on fries is hardly new.

"the breakfast poutine -- topped with bacon, sausage, scrambled eggs and served with a side of maple syrup "

But i guess simply putting stuff on fries and calling that "Poutine" is.
2014-05-16 12:08:00 PM  
1 votes:
I was introduced to Poutine in Canada a little over ten years ago, and have been likewise confused about why it hasn't been more popular in the US. I mean cheese, fries, and gravey, how is that not the perfect food for Americans?

KFC even serves poutine in Canada, and it's good.

I suppose Disco Fries would be the US equivalent, though they typically substitute a melty cheese like mozerella for the curds.
2014-05-16 11:03:49 AM  
1 votes:
Now all it needs is for some killjoy food mullahs to whine about all of the calories and fat it has, and there will be no stopping this dish from conquering the world.
 
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