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(Fangirl Review)   EA Sports: "We Hate our Fans" Part 2   (fangirlreview.com) divider line 47
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4538 clicks; posted to Geek » on 16 May 2014 at 10:04 AM (15 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-05-16 09:34:52 AM
Realistically do you think one person is going cause a ripple effect if I stop buying a game? Or do you think everyone across the world will stop buying a game in unison?

Translation: I lack the willpower to not purchase one of their games, so I'm instead going to say that my not purchasing the game wouldn't have any effect anyway.

/And your blog still sucks
 
2014-05-16 10:13:35 AM
your blog sucks
 
2014-05-16 10:15:09 AM
"As a fan what can we do to get it in EA's head that we want change, and that you can't keep screwing us each year with the same game with minor tweaks?"

HAHAHAHAHAHAHA!
*deep breath*

AAAAHHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!
 
2014-05-16 10:18:44 AM
Pretty much why I usually pick up a new FIFA game every 3 years. Not much really changes except rosters. Of course, I'm starting to become keen on the Football Manager series, which could complicate my relationship with the FIFA series.

/or if internet forums are to be believed, my relationship with my wife as well
 
2014-05-16 10:26:34 AM
if you're a fan of ea sports to begin with, you deserve the hatred
 
2014-05-16 10:26:57 AM
Yay! EA hate thread! These are fun.

/better get this out now
img.fark.net
 
2014-05-16 10:27:46 AM
My idea for a new innovative feature was for the NHL series. I always wanted to have my local announcers (Micky Redmond) on my game, so, why not have downloadable "color commentary" packs?

Seems like a cool idea in my head at least.
 
2014-05-16 10:31:51 AM
How do you play the top game where it's just a close-up of a player's torso? If you'd rather watch football, watch football.

//stopped buying assassins creed after 3
//it's not about "sending a message" or a ripple effect
//it's about saving your money for something you like
 
2014-05-16 10:38:27 AM
War's the Electric Boogaloo?!
 
2014-05-16 10:40:17 AM
For anyone who wants to avoid EA, but still needs a regular game fix, I recommend the Humble Bundle.  Over the next two weeks they are doing a bundle-a-day sale.

My steam/android catalog has ballooned to astronomical proportions from that site.
 
2014-05-16 10:58:04 AM

Zik-Zak: Pretty much why I usually pick up a new FIFA game every 3 years. Not much really changes except rosters. Of course, I'm starting to become keen on the Football Manager series, which could complicate my relationship with the FIFA series.

/or if internet forums are to be believed, my relationship with my wife as well


Same here...I bought Fifa 13 but broke down to buy 2014 WC just for the fun of trying to get the USA to win the World Cup. Now I can wait until i get a PS4 to buy Fifa 16 or 17
 
2014-05-16 11:12:58 AM
wasn't part one bad enough?
 
2014-05-16 11:18:57 AM
EA hates their fans almost as bad as this guy hates the English language.

The article wasn't called drivel because of your opinion, which was ill informed and poorly made, but because it was written like it was parsed through Google translate a few times.
 
2014-05-16 11:22:49 AM

Dust: your blog still sucks


FTFY
 
2014-05-16 12:06:29 PM

scottydoesntknow: Realistically do you think one person is going cause a ripple effect if I stop buying a game? Or do you think everyone across the world will stop buying a game in unison?

Translation: I lack the willpower to not purchase one of their games, so I'm instead going to say that my not purchasing the game wouldn't have any effect anyway.

/And your blog still sucks


Funny how someone who writes about video games would also completely ignore the whole XB1 debacle that resulted in MS dumping their DRM.  A strange thing happens when you boycott a company en masse, they start listening.
 
2014-05-16 12:06:51 PM
I really love Dragon Age, but since I hate both Steam and Origin, I already know that the only way I'm going to experience it is by watching Let's Play videos on YouTube.
That said, watching said videos gives a decent experience AND doesn't result in any monetary support for the things I don't like, so I feel that it's a reasonable compromise.
 
2014-05-16 12:10:28 PM
Basically every EA product seems to be riddled with bugs on its launch. The rise of DLC for games has made this worse, because now EA seemingly feels free to cash in by releasing pre-alpha quality code. Even their iOS/Android games are incredibly buggy and constantly introduce new bugs. It's like no one has ever heard of rigorous testing there or something.
 
2014-05-16 12:14:52 PM

Mnemia: Basically every EA product seems to be riddled with bugs on its launch.


They're features.
 
2014-05-16 12:14:59 PM

likefunbutnot: I really love Dragon Age, but since I hate both Steam and Origin, I already know that the only way I'm going to experience it is by watching Let's Play videos on YouTube.
That said, watching said videos gives a decent experience AND doesn't result in any monetary support for the things I don't like, so I feel that it's a reasonable compromise.


It's unfair to even remotely compare Steam to the Steaming Pile that is Origin. Yeah, it's still DRM, but at least it a) works without buckling under the load every time a patch to something is released, and b) carries a wide variety of games from many different publishers. Steam is a digital distribution site more akin to the iTunes App Store or Google Play; Origin is EA insisting on doing their own separate thing just to keep all of the money and power to themselves, and failing at implementing it. A closer comparison to Origin would be Activision's Battle.net, but Origin is way slower and more problem-prone.
 
2014-05-16 12:33:05 PM

likefunbutnot: I really love Dragon Age, but since I hate both Steam and Origin, I already know that the only way I'm going to experience it is by watching Let's Play videos on YouTube.
That said, watching said videos gives a decent experience AND doesn't result in any monetary support for the things I don't like, so I feel that it's a reasonable compromise.


Just a tip: You'd be better off reading the synopsis to Dragon Age 2 on wikipedia. That game was so boring it wouldn't be worth your time to actually watch the videos of it.
 
2014-05-16 12:33:56 PM
Obvious tag is still waiting for their latest Maddenrosterupdate 2014 to install to the PS4
 
2014-05-16 12:40:12 PM

Mnemia: Basically every EA product seems to be riddled with bugs on its launch. The rise of DLC for games has made this worse, because now EA seemingly feels free to cash in by releasing pre-alpha quality code. Even their iOS/Android games are incredibly buggy and constantly introduce new bugs. It's like no one has ever heard of rigorous testing there or something.


I know one of the testers for EA. Their practices are.... ridiculous.
 
2014-05-16 12:52:45 PM
Boycotted EA after ruining SimCity. Closest thing I've done to breaking this pledge is downloading Monopoly (EA published) from the Amazon App Store when it was offered as the free app of the day.
 
2014-05-16 12:53:09 PM

moothemagiccow: //stopped buying assassins creed after 3


Black Flag is pretty freaking good, and the tablet companion app adds some depth to it, too.
 
2014-05-16 12:56:35 PM
Sega is also on my boycott list after failing to deliver with The Conduit on Wii, but unlike EA, Sega doesn't make or publish any games that are worth a damn anymore.

/okay, I did buy Sonic 2 on Android when it was on sale for $0.99, I'm sorry
//and downloaded Crazy Taxi when it was offered for free, and tried out that Sonic endless runner game as well
///latter reminded me why they are on my do not buy list
 
2014-05-16 01:18:54 PM

Mnemia: It's unfair to even remotely compare Steam to the Steaming Pile that is Origin. Yeah, it's still DRM, but at least it a) works without buckling under the load every time a patch to something is released, and b) carries a wide variety of games from many different publishers.


OK. One more time:
It does not matter. I utterly resent the notion that my single player, offline games require my computer to play "Mother May I?" with an internet service. Once I've paid for it, it should be mine. Steam's offline mode doesn't work the way the general PC gaming public think it does, and until I can utterly divorce all the games purchased from its launcher and internet service and download using a standard web browser, I will not agree to its terms of service. GoG and Humble Bundle have a great online distribution model that works in a way that I accept. Steam does not. Origin does not.

For what it's worth, some Android titles from Amazon's app store also require online authentication prior to use and as a result I don't use Amazon's app store, either.
 
2014-05-16 01:21:12 PM

commisioner: Mnemia: Basically every EA product seems to be riddled with bugs on its launch. The rise of DLC for games has made this worse, because now EA seemingly feels free to cash in by releasing pre-alpha quality code. Even their iOS/Android games are incredibly buggy and constantly introduce new bugs. It's like no one has ever heard of rigorous testing there or something.

I know one of the testers for EA. Their practices are.... ridiculous.


Not at all surprising. The quality of their software speaks for itself on that point. I'd be embarrassed to put out a lot of the stuff they do routinely. Some of the regressions I've seen them introduce in patches to their products make me think they're not even doing unit testing or something, much less a more comprehensive testing program. Either they're hiring bottom-of-the-barrel coders, or (more likely) their management refuses to take the need for quality assurance seriously.
 
2014-05-16 01:24:05 PM
Thanks for that pointless follow up fark :P almost wanna say that to her but it's her blog so whatever but that green light might as well have been a comment in the old thread :P
 
2014-05-16 01:29:30 PM

likefunbutnot: Mnemia: It's unfair to even remotely compare Steam to the Steaming Pile that is Origin. Yeah, it's still DRM, but at least it a) works without buckling under the load every time a patch to something is released, and b) carries a wide variety of games from many different publishers.

OK. One more time:
It does not matter. I utterly resent the notion that my single player, offline games require my computer to play "Mother May I?" with an internet service. Once I've paid for it, it should be mine. Steam's offline mode doesn't work the way the general PC gaming public think it does, and until I can utterly divorce all the games purchased from its launcher and internet service and download using a standard web browser, I will not agree to its terms of service. GoG and Humble Bundle have a great online distribution model that works in a way that I accept. Steam does not. Origin does not.

For what it's worth, some Android titles from Amazon's app store also require online authentication prior to use and as a result I don't use Amazon's app store, either.


I understand and can respect voting with your feet against it. On the other hand, I think that fighting against the trend of online connected games is a losing battle at this point, at least as far as major big-budget publishers go. And it's been a decade and a half or more since I had to contend with non-broadband, non-always-on Internet, so it's not really a big inconvenience for me (or really even any inconvenience at all as long as you avoid the companies like EA that refuse to provide reliable servers to back their games). And there are some serious advantages for individuals to online distribution and always-on connection (mainly convenience and built-in infrastructure for multiplayer features). I'm willing to give up a little bit of control in exchange for convenience and the ability to download all of my old games readily with a single username and password the next time I get a new computer. And it's not like you "own" software anyway: it's always been a licensed product subject to the terms of use set by its developer. So I personally see it as a distinction that isn't too meaningful. But I can respect disagreement with that.
 
2014-05-16 01:39:51 PM
Meh.

The last Electronic Arts game I cared about was M.U.L.E.

/adjusts onion
 
2014-05-16 01:40:23 PM

Mnemia: I think that fighting against the trend of online connected games is a losing battle at this point


Until Comcast, Verizon and AT&T want to charge an additional $15 for accessing servers, even for "phoning home". Then maybe we can, as gamers, can help kill two birds with one stone.
 
2014-05-16 01:46:53 PM

Mnemia: commisioner: Mnemia: Basically every EA product seems to be riddled with bugs on its launch. The rise of DLC for games has made this worse, because now EA seemingly feels free to cash in by releasing pre-alpha quality code. Even their iOS/Android games are incredibly buggy and constantly introduce new bugs. It's like no one has ever heard of rigorous testing there or something.

I know one of the testers for EA. Their practices are.... ridiculous.

Not at all surprising. The quality of their software speaks for itself on that point. I'd be embarrassed to put out a lot of the stuff they do routinely. Some of the regressions I've seen them introduce in patches to their products make me think they're not even doing unit testing or something, much less a more comprehensive testing program. Either they're hiring bottom-of-the-barrel coders, or (more likely) their management refuses to take the need for quality assurance seriously.


Lack of people (seriously you'd be surprised how few people work on major aspects), time and there's an awful lot of out sourcing which returns crappy code. The crappy code then needs to be fixed as much as possible in the time given.
 
2014-05-16 01:54:34 PM

Bruce Campbell: moothemagiccow: //stopped buying assassins creed after 3

Black Flag is pretty freaking good, and the tablet companion app adds some depth to it, too.


I'm sure it's fine but it's clear they passed a turning point. There's no beautiful architecture to jump off in Barbados. Plus all its reviews are only like 10% better than AC3, which is a Bad Game. They had me, they lost me, I'm gone.
 
2014-05-16 02:27:19 PM

Zik-Zak: Pretty much why I usually pick up a new FIFA game every 3 years. Not much really changes except rosters. Of course, I'm starting to become keen on the Football Manager series, which could complicate my relationship with the FIFA series.

/or if internet forums are to be believed, my relationship with my wife as well


The only reason is because the online community dies each year and that is the only reason I really play it.  I don't have like 20 friends around at all times to compete with now that I am an adult.  Plus, for its faults, Ultimate Team is pretty rad
 
2014-05-16 02:31:09 PM

commisioner: Lack of people (seriously you'd be surprised how few people work on major aspects), time and there's an awful lot of out sourcing which returns crappy code. The crappy code then needs to be fixed as much as possible in the time given.


Yeah, I understand how that happens (and software is always only "good enough", not "done", but EA seems to have a very low definition of "good enough"). And I imagine that the games business is definitely very time-pressured given all of the competition that's out there. Outsourcing is a whole different problem (in my experience, it actually wastes more time than it saves, because of both quality issues and lag time/communication issues). I'm definitely in the camp of "I'd rather write it correctly once", but it seems like most businesspeople disagree with me and prefer to pay twice for the same code for some reason (once for the outsourcing and once for the people who have to clean up the mess to make it releasable).

Bottom line is, I guess it works for them, because people keep buying their crappy products.
 
2014-05-16 02:37:33 PM

RoxtarRyan: Mnemia: I think that fighting against the trend of online connected games is a losing battle at this point

Until Comcast, Verizon and AT&T want to charge an additional $15 for accessing servers, even for "phoning home". Then maybe we can, as gamers, can help kill two birds with one stone.


I do agree that Comcast, Verizon, and AT&T are evil and stupid enough to try that, but if we get to that point where every Internet connection to anyone has to be negotiated and paid for individually like cable television, the Internet is basically dead as a concept. Our government may well go with what the Verizon and Comcast lawyers are telling them to do, but all that that will mean is just that the United States will cede its position as the hub of the Internet and Internet-based industry for the world. All of the software industry would just move somewhere else where the government isn't completely stupid about regulating the Internet.

Opposition to net neutrality is the same thing as opposition to the economic viability of the United States in the 21st century. The question is just whether enough people will understand that in advance to prevent it from happening or if they will only understand after the policies of our "leaders" have disastrous effects.
 
2014-05-16 02:52:36 PM

Mnemia: if we get to that point where every Internet connection to anyone has to be negotiated and paid for individually like cable television, the Internet is basically dead as a concept


We've taken the first steps, sadly. I imagine that my son will not be able to enjoy the same freedom we've been able to have up to this point in my life.
 
2014-05-16 03:06:48 PM

RoxtarRyan: Mnemia: if we get to that point where every Internet connection to anyone has to be negotiated and paid for individually like cable television, the Internet is basically dead as a concept

We've taken the first steps, sadly. I imagine that my son will not be able to enjoy the same freedom we've been able to have up to this point in my life.


I agree with you, for the most part. My point is that we'll have bigger problems in this country than having to pay to play online games if our leaders decide to commit economic suicide by destroying the Internet.
 
2014-05-16 03:16:28 PM

Mnemia: RoxtarRyan: Mnemia: if we get to that point where every Internet connection to anyone has to be negotiated and paid for individually like cable television, the Internet is basically dead as a concept

We've taken the first steps, sadly. I imagine that my son will not be able to enjoy the same freedom we've been able to have up to this point in my life.

I agree with you, for the most part. My point is that we'll have bigger problems in this country than having to pay to play online games if our leaders decide to commit economic suicide by destroying the Internet.


It won't just be economic suicide. Damn near everything in this country is tied to the internet one way or another, from cars, televisions, home security monitors, kitchen appliances, media outlets, etc. Everything from interstate to international trade/business, politics, news, social networking... it will be in the hands of people who believe that the problem with their networks are the people that pay to use them, and they are quite public about their opinions.
 
2014-05-16 03:22:19 PM

Mnemia: Opposition to net neutrality is the same thing as opposition to the economic viability of the United States in the 21st century. The question is just whether enough people will understand that in advance to prevent it from happening or if they will only understand after the policies of our "leaders" have disastrous effects.


If the Tea Party is any indication, they may just find a scapegoat so that they don't have to accept blame for their actions.
 
2014-05-16 06:30:41 PM

likefunbutnot: I utterly resent the notion that my single player, offline games require my computer to play "Mother May I?" with an internet service.


Which is great, since that's not how it works.

Did you also take umbrage at the fact that you need a library card to rent books? Or that you need a DVD to install a game?

But I don't try to reason with the 'WHAARADS;LKFWERMGALS STEM BE SSTANASD BALLS!!!' people. Ya, it's farking killing the gaming industry or something, I guess, and you're just the plucky underdog to tell us all how it sucks and why even though you don't use it.
 
2014-05-16 10:15:21 PM

kroonermanblack: Which is great, since that's not how it works.


No, that's exactly how it works. If you uninstall Steam, you can no longer launch the overwhelming majority of Steam-purchased titles. You have to periodically re-authenticate to use the service. You can't use your backups to reinstall without using Steam or without re-authenticating. Titles can be yanked from the service because of disputes between publishers or distributors or because someone at Valve decides that you did something wrong. For most PC gamers, Steam has really become this massive single point of failure in a way that PC gamers should never have to be exposed to. There's a reason we're using awesome general-purpose machines with vast storage capability and endless levels of customization, and it's not so we can collectively be Valve's biatch.

If I buy a game from GoG, I can download that game whenever I want using a web browser. I can keep the install files on-hand; they're not going to stop working. The only time I have to authenticate is at the point of purchase/download. From an end-user standpoint, it's a much better deal. GoG could go away tomorrow but I'd still have the games I paid for. GoG can't take away the software I've already downloaded. I can reinstall and run the games anyplace I'd like. I don't understand why anyone would voluntarily choose the former option over the latter.
 
2014-05-16 10:54:54 PM

likefunbutnot: There's a reason we're using awesome general-purpose machines with vast storage capability and endless levels of customization, and it's not so we can collectively be Valve's biatch.


the biggest mitigating factor is that the alternative to steam is, in many cases, utter garbage like uplay or origin which is publisher dependent, because larger publishers have a massive boner for drm bullshiat and that isn't going away any time soon because too much of the market couldn't care less how much malware hits their computer

that it's not ideal is not ideal, but the limitations are relatively minor as far as forced drm goes. last i checked, offline mode works without any need for reauthentication (though it is hilariously buggy). and i'm unaware of a title that has been yanked from libraries (other than on an individual basis for individual bullshiattery). gog is certainly better, but it's got a niche role and will remain that way
 
2014-05-16 10:57:54 PM

likefunbutnot: kroonermanblack: Which is great, since that's not how it works.

No, that's exactly how it works. If you uninstall Steam, you can no longer launch the overwhelming majority of Steam-purchased titles. You have to periodically re-authenticate to use the service. You can't use your backups to reinstall without using Steam or without re-authenticating. Titles can be yanked from the service because of disputes between publishers or distributors or because someone at Valve decides that you did something wrong. For most PC gamers, Steam has really become this massive single point of failure in a way that PC gamers should never have to be exposed to. There's a reason we're using awesome general-purpose machines with vast storage capability and endless levels of customization, and it's not so we can collectively be Valve's biatch.

If I buy a game from GoG, I can download that game whenever I want using a web browser. I can keep the install files on-hand; they're not going to stop working. The only time I have to authenticate is at the point of purchase/download. From an end-user standpoint, it's a much better deal. GoG could go away tomorrow but I'd still have the games I paid for. GoG can't take away the software I've already downloaded. I can reinstall and run the games anyplace I'd like. I don't understand why anyone would voluntarily choose the former option over the latter.


When you use Steam, it does not preclude you from purchasing games from somewhere else. Why do I use Steam? Most of my time spent on Steam is on muli-player games (two are free and one was a gift). With Steam I can easily to connect to my friends and consolidate all those clients into one launcher. Looking down my Steam library there are two games (Reus and Sim City 3) I could have gotten from GoG, and I got them ~80% off. Hey look, Dungeon Keeper 2 is on GoG and it is one of the best games of all time. Hey wait, every review says that it has such compatibility issues that it is unplayable on a machine made this century. I don't like standing in the way of screeds of such unadulterated poop smearing geekery, but Steam doesn't kick you in the floppies if you use a program you didn't get on Steam. If you want to feel better because you have one less tool in your toolbox, that is fine. Just don't make it sound like you are a superior species to those who chose to have a bigger toolbox. I buy games off Steam, GoG, retail, the dev, or wherever I feel is the best deal and fit. I bet you have strong opinions on consoles and browser games too.
 
2014-05-17 03:50:54 AM

Electrify: Boycotted EA after ruining SimCity.


It took you that long?!
 
2014-05-17 06:45:59 AM
That's a nice 1997 website you have there, featured partner
 
2014-05-17 07:27:28 AM

Altair: Electrify: Boycotted EA after ruining SimCity.

It took you that long?!


Seriously. What about "EA is making a SimCity" inspired any sort of confidence that it wouldn't be a steaming pile?
 
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