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(The Daily Beast)   Sixty years after school segregation was struck down by the Supreme Court, as many as 90 percent of students are in segregated schools, especially the dusky-hued ones in the South. Take that, Brown v Board Of Education   (thedailybeast.com) divider line 103
    More: Sad, U.S. Supreme Court, charter schools, school boards, American Federation of Teachers, Randi Weingarten, public education, carbon sequestration, school choice  
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3647 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 May 2014 at 9:43 AM (32 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-05-16 09:12:26 AM  
On the one hand, we have to take into consideration the disadvantaged backgrounds many students have and not give up on them just based on their inability to score well enough on entrance exams, but on the other hand many of these disadvantaged students are already broken to the degree that they will not benefit from the accelerated and intensive education provided by some of these charter schools. Which is not to say that disguising racism through standardized testing is in any way acceptable these days, but rather that the acceptance that students will reach their full potential in environments that help them achieve their full potential and that fostering of achievement takes different forms for different students.

If an underachieving black student enters an all-black charter school and begins achieving, shall we say that his achievement is less because the school imposes segregation on itself? Or should we take a step back and judge the school on its ability to graduate students who are respectable and productive members of society and the student's personal achievement on the extent to which he fulfilled not only his potential but to the extent that he contributes to society?

Placing the mark of racism on anything simply based on unwillingness to bow to social pressures is intellectually lazy, especially so when the name-caller is overlooking the overall good done for each student.
 
2014-05-16 09:18:09 AM  
'Cause there are no racists anywhere but the South, right?

 If you read the article- it's a nationwide issue, no "especially in the South."
 
2014-05-16 09:47:45 AM  
"Sixty years ago tomorrow "

Stopped reading right there.  I don't want to cause a rift in space-time.
 
2014-05-16 09:49:00 AM  
B-b-but the South isn't racist! Youre the one that's racist!
 
2014-05-16 09:49:03 AM  

mysticcat: 'Cause there are no racists anywhere but the South, right?


No, but they really, really love being in the South.
 
2014-05-16 09:51:10 AM  

mysticcat: 'Cause there are no racists anywhere but the South, right?

 If you read the article- it's a nationwide issue, no "especially in the South."


Not to speak for him/her but I'm not sure that's what Subby was trying to say.
 
2014-05-16 09:51:17 AM  
 
2014-05-16 09:52:54 AM  
All that bussing of kids across town, what a waste of fuel. Should be able to go to a school in your own neighborhood.
 
2014-05-16 09:53:18 AM  
Wow, this is terrible! Especially when you find out that it is exactly the opposite of the truth.  Schools in the north are more segregated it seems

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/03/26/new-york-schools-segregated_ n _5034455.html
 
2014-05-16 09:53:32 AM  
Here in the North, a return to neighborhood schools, which are supposedly better, in neighborhoods which had been redlined for decades has resulted in the same situation.
 
2014-05-16 09:55:09 AM  

AverageAmericanGuy: Placing the mark of racism on anything simply based on unwillingness to bow to social pressures is intellectually lazy, especially so when the name-caller is overlooking the overall good done for each student.


I argue the problem is more that many of the problems that are blamed on racism are more of the result of economic inequality.  It is something tied to racism on some level, but much of time rather than working on economic disparity (which would solve the biggest problems), people instead focus on race.  Which is exactly what the people in power want.  If you focus on race, you can pit poor white people against poor black people or middle-class white people against poor black people.  If it's about economic inequality, it's the rich versus the poor, and that makes rich people very uncomfortable.  Focusing on the racial side of things just helps the rich.  We should focus on why segregation occurs: it's really mostly the economics.
 
2014-05-16 09:55:12 AM  
Yes, because obviously private schools equal segregation. How dare those rich people give their children higher education instead of pushing them through the metal detectors of the public school. What injustice! What cheek! It's not like the government can make the public schools more like places of learning instead of ultramax prisons just because some mouth breather shoots up the students every ten years.
 
2014-05-16 09:56:55 AM  
Wow that was all over the place:

- Racists in the SOUTH and all over the nation
- TESTING is bad
- CHARTER Schools are BAD
- UNIONS are Great

When I got the to the UNIONS are great, sort of all came together - also noted this about the writer (not that it was unexpected)

"Sally Kohn is a progressive activist and writer"

She apparently puts the lib in liberal, which is fine, just good to know where they are writing from
 
2014-05-16 09:57:07 AM  

InterruptingQuirk: Here in the North, a return to neighborhood schools, which are supposedly better, in neighborhoods which had been redlined for decades has resulted in the same situation.


See, this is the issue.

Parents (white and black), in general, like their kids going to schools very near where they live.

Many neighborhoods are still de facto segregated, with one race dominating.

Therefore, many schools are still de facto segregated, with one race dominating.
 
2014-05-16 09:58:22 AM  
Yeah! What we need to do is make as many kids as possible kids go to schools out of their area until we feel each school is at Power Ranger level of color diversity
 
2014-05-16 10:00:04 AM  

Geotpf: InterruptingQuirk: Here in the North, a return to neighborhood schools, which are supposedly better, in neighborhoods which had been redlined for decades has resulted in the same situation.

See, this is the issue.

Parents (white and black), in general, like their kids going to schools very near where they live.

Many neighborhoods are still de facto segregated, with one race dominating.

Therefore, many schools are still de facto segregated, with one race dominating.


De facto - you used it twice
 
2014-05-16 10:00:04 AM  

doubled99: Yeah! What we need to do is make as many kids as possible kids go to schools out of their area until we feel each school is at Power Ranger level of color diversity


I've always felt the Blues weren't well represented in our public school system.
 
2014-05-16 10:00:25 AM  

Geotpf: InterruptingQuirk: Here in the North, a return to neighborhood schools, which are supposedly better, in neighborhoods which had been redlined for decades has resulted in the same situation.

See, this is the issue.

Parents (white and black), in general, like their kids going to schools very near where they live.

Many neighborhoods are still de facto segregated, with one race dominating.

Therefore, many schools are still de facto segregated, with one race dominating.


Yup.  And most neighborhoods are segregated because of economic disparity.  Economic disparity started growing right around the end of the Civil Rights era, making it harder for African-Americans to move up the social ladder in a way other groups in the past did.  At least that's the simplified version from my point of view.
 
2014-05-16 10:01:10 AM  

JohnCarter: Geotpf: InterruptingQuirk: Here in the North, a return to neighborhood schools, which are supposedly better, in neighborhoods which had been redlined for decades has resulted in the same situation.

See, this is the issue.

Parents (white and black), in general, like their kids going to schools very near where they live.

Many neighborhoods are still de facto segregated, with one race dominating.

Therefore, many schools are still de facto segregated, with one race dominating.

De facto - you used it twice


he really likes de facto
 
2014-05-16 10:04:08 AM  
Stupidity.  Segregation in education was the practice and law of assigning kids to schools based on color, not geographic location.  School districts are based on geography... where you live... so, if you live in a school district with 90% black kids, your school will be... wait for it... 90% black.  That doesn't make it "segregated".  Idiot author is an idiot.

Use the word correctly.  If you wanna say a school that is 95% white is "gentrified" I may get on board, but you cant get away with "segregated".
 
2014-05-16 10:07:02 AM  

Rotluchs: Stupidity.  Segregation in education was the practice and law of assigning kids to schools based on color, not geographic location.  School districts are based on geography... where you live... so, if you live in a school district with 90% black kids, your school will be... wait for it... 90% black.  That doesn't make it "segregated".  Idiot author is an idiot.

Use the word correctly.  If you wanna say a school that is 95% white is "gentrified" I may get on board, but you cant get away with "segregated".


Segregate
v.
set apart from the rest or from each other; isolate or divide

Um, that sounds like segregation to me.  Now there may be reasons that cause that, but it doesn't change what it is.  Or mean that we aren't creating lower classes of people because of the way things are.  I think it's illogical to focus on the racial aspect of it but the way schools are set up it makes it near impossible for lower class students to succeed, white or black.
 
2014-05-16 10:08:25 AM  
People that have a choice want to send their kids to a well achieving school.  SHOCKING.
 
2014-05-16 10:08:29 AM  
Is it segregation we're concerned about, or forcible segregation?

\Abortions for some
 
2014-05-16 10:08:38 AM  
Horseshiat, the north uses charter schools to segregate, the south uses Christian Private Schools.
 
2014-05-16 10:10:53 AM  

Scorpitron is reduced to a thin red paste: B-b-but the South isn't racist! Youre the one that's racist!





The Nation's Most Segregated Schools Aren't Where You'd Think They'd Be

New York State's public schools are the most segregated in the nation, with the most black and Latino students in schools where less than a 10th are white, according to the University of California at Los Angeles

New York was followed by Illinois, Michigan, Maryland and New Jersey as states with the highest number of black students in schools where less than 10 percent are white, according to a 2012 study by the same authors. New Mexico, Texas, Delaware, California and Nevada are the states where white students have the most exposure to black and Latino students.


Black students are most segregated in the Northeast

"The Northeast was the only region where, on average, the share of black students in almost completely minority schools has risen since 1968, according to the report titled "Brown at 60: Great Progress, a Long Retreat and an Uncertain Future." More than half - 51.4 percent - of black students in those states in 2011 were in schools whose student populations were 90 percent to 100 percent minorities. In every other region of the country - the Midwest, West, South and "border" states - black students today are less likely to be in heavily minority schools."


West Virginia is the most integrated state across the board. The share of black students in majority-white schools is incredibly high - 92.6 percent
 
2014-05-16 10:11:52 AM  

rjakobi: Yes, because obviously private schools equal segregation. How dare those rich people give their children higher education instead of pushing them through the metal detectors of the public school. What injustice! What cheek! It's not like the government can make the public schools more like places of learning instead of ultramax prisons just because some mouth breather shoots up the students every ten years.



How dare those rich people lobby lawmakers to funnel public money into those private schools that only their kids can afford and then point to the deteriorating, under-funded schools to use it as justification of their theft.
 
2014-05-16 10:12:29 AM  
I see what they are getting at, but what it really boils down to is this: Since Brown v. BoE, racist white people have been sending their kids to private schools or moving to all white neighborhoods in order to avoid integration. The author seems to think that trucking a bus load of minorities into the burbs will somehow change this, but the author is wrong.

People who think that forcing people into doing something they don't want to do will somehow fix the issue are fooling themselves. All it serves to do is create a backlash problem on top of those parents who REALLY don't want their kids mixing to find some OTHER way to avoid it.

When you get enough people working together to find an exploit in a system they don't like, they will find it, period. Exploiting weaknesses is something we humans are kind of popular for.

You can desegregate, you can force buses to haul kids around to other schools for mixing purposes and you may or may not see results, but the REAL solution begins by teaching kids from a very early age that bigotry is wrong.

I grew up in a school that had a total of 3 black students, 2 asian students and no hispanic students. Everyone else was white. The school taught things like equality and tried to educate against bigotry. They had an uphill battle because most of the families in that town are racist. But the school's message wasn't lost on all of us. A lot of us came out of there for the better and moved away from there, those that wanted to keep the town white, still live there, generation after generation. I just hope that school is still trying to spread the right message.
 
2014-05-16 10:13:32 AM  
Soooooo, if the North is racist...and the South is racist...Naw, nevermind. It's still all the black people's fault.
 
2014-05-16 10:20:07 AM  
Hey white libs - "person of color" isn't any less offensive than "colored boy" and clearly "black and brown" people don't look like each other.
 
2014-05-16 10:22:29 AM  
"Charter schools that screen students based on test scores end up including fewer low-income students because study after study shows that standardized test scores correlated directly with family economic status.  "
WHAT? Grades count? Unacceptable.... lower the standards now!!
 
2014-05-16 10:22:53 AM  

moothemagiccow: Hey white libs - "person of color" isn't any less offensive than "colored boy" and clearly "black and brown" people don't look like each other.


Time for some sensitivity training
 
2014-05-16 10:24:39 AM  
Minority students who wish to be educated have the opportunity regardless of what any study wants to report. There may be added distractions, but there are more resources available for these students than there was for any culture's children in humanity's entire history. Most minority children don't like school and don't like the structure that goes along with learning and being challenged. It's simply not a part of their culture. There are white students that fall into this category, but they are usually labelled the "bad kid" and the other students see them as an example of what not to do. In predominately minority schools, the opposite is true. Everyone be misbehavin.
 
2014-05-16 10:27:10 AM  
race is a symptom of the problem, not the cause of it.  the causes are economics-particularly income inequality.  white, black, brown-it makes no difference.  if you don't have the income to live where the good schools are, your children aren't going to go to the good schools.  and the folks who already live where the good schools are, are not going to sacrifice their own children's place in those schools so the poor kids can have a seat.

its a big problem we're facing here in our area of NC.  the state has gutted education, and housing in the few public school systems that are still performing well is easily double the cost of living in a low-performing school district.  my wife and i went hundreds of thousands of dollars in debt and work sometimes seven days a week to afford to live here and for our children to go to those schools, as do my neighbors.  if we were told that starting next fall our kids would have to get on a bus before sunrise to go to a lousy school on the other side of town to make room for kids from that area to be able to go to the schools here, i'd fight it tooth and nail.  the color of the kids being brought in wouldn't be the issue-the issue would be that for every one of them coming in, my own children or my neighbor's children would have to be shipped out.

that's why there really isn't a solution to this problem, even after we as a society have spent decades and trillions of dollars trying to solve it.  there will always be folks who have more, and folks who have less regardless of how that is proportioned, and both of them will be willing to fight each other to the death to give their own children the best opportunities possible, without sacrificing any to the other.
 
2014-05-16 10:29:34 AM  
If you live in a predominantly one race neighborhood and send your kid to the school in that neighborhood it stands to reason that the school will be predominantly that race.

Many of the issues that the author brings up may or may not be directly contributable to race but rather cultural/environmental issues.
 
2014-05-16 10:32:15 AM  

hasty ambush: West Virginia is the most integrated state across the board. The share of black students in majority-white schools is incredibly high - 92.6 percent


There are black people in West Virginia?
 
2014-05-16 10:33:01 AM  
Schools in Chicago are fairly segregated, but the difference between that and what was happening in most of the country 60 years ago, is that it's not enforced by law.  The issue is, whites tend to live on the north and northwest sides of the city, whereas blacks and Hispanics tend to live on the south and southwest sides of the city.  As a result, the public schools in those areas reflect that.  When my parents were in grammar school and high school back in the 50s and 60s, you went to the school in your neighborhood.  If your neighborhood was all-white, your school was all-white.  If your neighborhood was all-black, your school was all-black.  While public schools don't operate that way anymore, in that you don't have to attend the school in your neighborhood if you choose not to, there still isn't a lot of "blending of the waters", as it were.
 
2014-05-16 10:37:01 AM  

hasty ambush: West Virginia is the most integrated state across the board. The share of black students in majority-white schools is incredibly high - 92.6 percent


It's also the third poorest state.  I am guessing that's not a coincidence.
 
2014-05-16 10:39:47 AM  
Here is another idea... it has nothing to do at all with race.  It has everything to do with the value the parents of the kids put in education.  Education is directly tied to income in adulthood.  Poor areas are flooded with folks who don't care about education.  Therefore, the kids get away with not giving a crap about school.  the ones who DO care in those same neighborhoods get good educations, because its there for the getting, and get out, the poor stupid ones stay, fail and propagate the whole problem.  It has nothing to do with race.  It has everything to do with the attitude of the parents.  Until education is UNIVERSALLY VALUED, we will have underperforming kids and clumps of them together in underperforming schools.
 
2014-05-16 10:40:57 AM  

DROxINxTHExWIND: How dare those rich people lobby lawmakers to funnel public money into those private schools that only their kids can afford and then point to the deteriorating, under-funded schools to use it as justification of their theft.


It isn't even rich people, it's lots of middle-class people as well.

A friend of mine from High School has 4 kids, 3 of them in school.  He pays for them to go to private school because, despite having a very nice house in a very nice neighborhood, the schools his kids would go to are not-so-great.  They aren't horrible schools, but they could be better.

So when he looks at his property tax bill you can likely understand that he gets pretty irate that a large sum of money is coming out of his paycheck and going to fund schools that his kids don't attend.  If you were writing that check  you would want the ability to use your money to pay for your kids to go to the school of your choice, but he doesn't get that option.  This is the kind of thing that gets people irate and leads to voucher programs: people want a choice of where their tax dollars are spent on educating their kids.  A lot of people are tired of the money being poured into the gaping maw and then having some of it eventually filter down to their kids, but without any control of where that money gets divided and siphoned off as it trickles down.
 
2014-05-16 10:41:26 AM  

sign_of_Zeta: Geotpf: InterruptingQuirk: Here in the North, a return to neighborhood schools, which are supposedly better, in neighborhoods which had been redlined for decades has resulted in the same situation.

See, this is the issue.

Parents (white and black), in general, like their kids going to schools very near where they live.

Many neighborhoods are still de facto segregated, with one race dominating.

Therefore, many schools are still de facto segregated, with one race dominating.

Yup.  And most neighborhoods are segregated because of economic disparity.  Economic disparity started growing right around the end of the Civil Rights era, making it harder for African-Americans to move up the social ladder in a way other groups in the past did.  At least that's the simplified version from my point of view.


And the worst part is that economic disparity is highest in blue cities and states.
http://www.money-rates.com/research-center/income-inequality.htm
 
2014-05-16 10:43:45 AM  

Joe Blowme: "Charter schools that screen students based on test scores end up including fewer low-income students because study after study shows that standardized test scores correlated directly with family economic status.  "
WHAT? Grades count? Unacceptable.... lower the standards now!!


Yeah, not entirely certain how you missed the point the author was making.  The referenced studies show that the current standardized testing correlates with economic status, not actual knowledge, intelligence, or academic performance, but the financial background.  You can argue the validity of the author's claim.  But, if it is an accurate one, then standardized tests are failing today's youth and are serving only as a tool to segregate along economic lines.
 
2014-05-16 10:44:45 AM  
Derptastic article. FTFA, quote from Brown:

"To separate [children] from others of similar age and qualifications solely because of their race generates a feeling of inferiority as to their status in the community that may affect their hearts and minds in a way unlikely ever to be undone."

Emphasis mine. Differing test performance means differing qualifications, provided it is a standardized test of academic preparedness (or aptitude, or whatever other word is in vogue these days).

Yes, some people do poorly on the tests and that is unfortunate for them. I'd think the ire should be leveled at a system that let them fail upwards to that point, though.
 
2014-05-16 10:45:26 AM  
Oh, and I pay GOOOOOD money that I would much rather spend elsewhere to send my kid to a private catholic school (im not catholic, or religious at all for that matter) so that he does not have to go through the local Hispanic gang gladiator academies that are the "public schools" where I live.  There are Hispanic kids in his catholic school too, but ones whose parents CARE about education.  I don't care what race the kids are where he goes to school, I ONLY care... and I mean ONLY care... that the majority of the kids have parents who want them to learn.  Period.  White. Black. Asian. Whatever-you-are.  Don't care.  Just be there to learn.

And the catholic school can throw their butt out if they misbehave too often.  Hence, a learning environment.  And THAT is what this is all about.  If I couldn't afford catholic school, I would ride my kids a$$ 50% harder in public school to help him avoid the distractions and hopefully he wouldn't get shanked before 8th grade.  Since I don't have to worry about that, I just ride his a$$ like a normal parent to do his homework and get good grades.
 
2014-05-16 10:48:49 AM  

mrmopar5287: DROxINxTHExWIND: How dare those rich people lobby lawmakers to funnel public money into those private schools that only their kids can afford and then point to the deteriorating, under-funded schools to use it as justification of their theft.

It isn't even rich people, it's lots of middle-class people as well.

A friend of mine from High School has 4 kids, 3 of them in school.  He pays for them to go to private school because, despite having a very nice house in a very nice neighborhood, the schools his kids would go to are not-so-great.  They aren't horrible schools, but they could be better.

So when he looks at his property tax bill you can likely understand that he gets pretty irate that a large sum of money is coming out of his paycheck and going to fund schools that his kids don't attend.  If you were writing that check  you would want the ability to use your money to pay for your kids to go to the school of your choice, but he doesn't get that option.  This is the kind of thing that gets people irate and leads to voucher programs: people want a choice of where their tax dollars are spent on educating their kids.  A lot of people are tired of the money being poured into the gaping maw and then having some of it eventually filter down to their kids, but without any control of where that money gets divided and siphoned off as it trickles down.



Funding public education is a responsibility of us ALL. Anyone who can't see the benefit of making sure that every child has the opportunity for a top-notch education is a fool. What about the people who don't have kids? Why should they have to pay for schools at all? Your friend is not only selfish, he's short-sighted. We will all have a hefty price to pay if we create another generation of dummies. See 2000 - 2008 for best results.
 
2014-05-16 10:51:41 AM  

mrmopar5287: So when he looks at his property tax bill you can likely understand that he gets pretty irate that a large sum of money is coming out of his paycheck and going to fund schools that his kids don't attend.  If you were writing that check  you would want the ability to use your money to pay for your kids to go to the school of your choice, but he doesn't get that option.  This is the kind of thing that gets people irate and leads to voucher programs:


Sure, but only if people that have no kids can opt out entirely. Unfortunately, allowing this would cause the system would collapse. I'm not sure your average voucher voter (ha!) even thinks this is a bad thing.


v2micca: Joe Blowme: "Charter schools that screen students based on test scores end up including fewer low-income students because study after study shows that standardized test scores correlated directly with family economic status.  "
WHAT? Grades count? Unacceptable.... lower the standards now!!

Yeah, not entirely certain how you missed the point the author was making.  The referenced studies show that the current standardized testing correlates with economic status, not actual knowledge, intelligence, or academic performance, but the financial background.  You can argue the validity of the author's claim.  But, if it is an accurate one, then standardized tests are failing today's youth and are serving only as a tool to segregate along economic lines.


The correlation with economic status for many important standardized tests is minimal. The test prep effect is also minimal. Test scores correlate with performance (at least with the SAT and college first year grades. Know what first year grades correlate with? Graduating).

Apologies for a Slate article: http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/science/2014/04/what_ do_sat_and_iq_tests_measure_general_intelligence_predicts_school_and.h tml

Anyone who has had the inclination to look at this in a large scale dataset with a test that purportedly measures ability comes to similar conclusions. It may be possible that every single one of them (SAT, GRE, ASVAB, ACT, etcetera) is biased (in oddly similar ways), and therefore no test at all is valid. However, that conclusion seems to me to stem more from the a priori assumption that ability cannot be measured than from the evidence.
 
2014-05-16 10:51:51 AM  

zepher: sign_of_Zeta: Geotpf: InterruptingQuirk: Here in the North, a return to neighborhood schools, which are supposedly better, in neighborhoods which had been redlined for decades has resulted in the same situation.

See, this is the issue.

Parents (white and black), in general, like their kids going to schools very near where they live.

Many neighborhoods are still de facto segregated, with one race dominating.

Therefore, many schools are still de facto segregated, with one race dominating.

Yup.  And most neighborhoods are segregated because of economic disparity.  Economic disparity started growing right around the end of the Civil Rights era, making it harder for African-Americans to move up the social ladder in a way other groups in the past did.  At least that's the simplified version from my point of view.

And the worst part is that economic disparity is highest in blue cities and states.
http://www.money-rates.com/research-center/income-inequality.htm


You don't have to tell me, I live in Milwaukee.  The city is so segregated and the school's are God awful.  The school board has zero accountability to it (one of my college professors was a member and he was a drug using moron who never showed up on time to anything or actually taught), the city itself has no direction, and there's so little hope of change  in the low income areas that no one even tries in school.  Why try when you see no success?

There's growth in the county but the city itself is dead.  The downtown has nice things like the museums but there is no life to the downtown.  Without that many of the low income areas will never grow, and money that would support education never come in.  So you have dead zones with crappy schools and children who will live their entire lives in a few square mile radius.
 
2014-05-16 10:52:25 AM  
 
2014-05-16 10:52:56 AM  

v2micca: Joe Blowme: "Charter schools that screen students based on test scores end up including fewer low-income students because study after study shows that standardized test scores correlated directly with family economic status.  "
WHAT? Grades count? Unacceptable.... lower the standards now!!

Yeah, not entirely certain how you missed the point the author was making.  The referenced studies show that the current standardized testing correlates with economic status, not actual knowledge, intelligence, or academic performance, but the financial background.  You can argue the validity of the author's claim.  But, if it is an accurate one, then standardized tests are failing today's youth and are serving only as a tool to segregate along economic lines.


So the rich are buying the answers? Or is it rich people magic? So lower the standards? or take away points from successful students? redistribution of grades?
 
2014-05-16 10:55:39 AM  

Joe Blowme: v2micca: Joe Blowme: "Charter schools that screen students based on test scores end up including fewer low-income students because study after study shows that standardized test scores correlated directly with family economic status.  "
WHAT? Grades count? Unacceptable.... lower the standards now!!

Yeah, not entirely certain how you missed the point the author was making.  The referenced studies show that the current standardized testing correlates with economic status, not actual knowledge, intelligence, or academic performance, but the financial background.  You can argue the validity of the author's claim.  But, if it is an accurate one, then standardized tests are failing today's youth and are serving only as a tool to segregate along economic lines.

So the rich are buying the answers? Or is it rich people magic? So lower the standards? or take away points from successful students? redistribution of grades?


The phrase "correlate directly" implies two things: the link is causal (we don't know this for certain) and that the correlation is near 1, or that 100% of the variation in standardized test scores is accounted for by economic status.

The latter isn't even close to true.
 
2014-05-16 10:56:04 AM  

DROxINxTHExWIND: mrmopar5287: DROxINxTHExWIND: How dare those rich people lobby lawmakers to funnel public money into those private schools that only their kids can afford and then point to the deteriorating, under-funded schools to use it as justification of their theft.

It isn't even rich people, it's lots of middle-class people as well.

A friend of mine from High School has 4 kids, 3 of them in school.  He pays for them to go to private school because, despite having a very nice house in a very nice neighborhood, the schools his kids would go to are not-so-great.  They aren't horrible schools, but they could be better.

So when he looks at his property tax bill you can likely understand that he gets pretty irate that a large sum of money is coming out of his paycheck and going to fund schools that his kids don't attend.  If you were writing that check  you would want the ability to use your money to pay for your kids to go to the school of your choice, but he doesn't get that option.  This is the kind of thing that gets people irate and leads to voucher programs: people want a choice of where their tax dollars are spent on educating their kids.  A lot of people are tired of the money being poured into the gaping maw and then having some of it eventually filter down to their kids, but without any control of where that money gets divided and siphoned off as it trickles down.


Funding public education is a responsibility of us ALL. Anyone who can't see the benefit of making sure that every child has the opportunity for a top-notch education is a fool. What about the people who don't have kids? Why should they have to pay for schools at all? Your friend is not only selfish, he's short-sighted. We will all have a hefty price to pay if we create another generation of dummies. See 2000 - 2008 for best results.


I hate the property taxes in my neighborhood as much as the next guy.  But even though I don't have any kids I see the money I spend on the local school districts for what it is, property value investment.  The better the local schools in my neighborhood, the better the value of my home.  So, if my job ever takes me to a new location, I know I will be able to get out of my current home without taking a bath on the sale.
 
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